Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Calvert, TX

Find local Calvert, Texas florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Calvert and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Calvert Flower Shops

Calvert Florist

519 South Main
Calvert, TX 77837
(979) 364-3651

Calvert TX News

Oct 15, 2020

Dawn Lowe Obituary - Bloomington, IL | The Pantagraph - Legacy.com

September 22, 2020 at Martin Heath Center in Bloomington. There will be a funeral service for Dawn on Saturday, September 26, 2020, at 5 PM at Calvert & Metzler Memorial Home in Bloomington. Reverend Sara Isbell will officiate. There will be a visitation from 3-5 PM at the Memorial Home Saturday. Interment will be later at Camp Butler National Cemetery in Springfield. Dawn was born March 7, 1926, in Milwaukee, WI to Henry and Marie Koktavy Thomsen. She married Rev. Donald L. Lowe on August 12, 1951, in Beloit, WI. He preceded her in death on December 16, 2019 in Normal. She is also preceded in death by one sister, Marilyn Helm. Dawn is survived by two daughters, Debra Sasveld of Naperville, Dauna (Mark) Delashmit of Bloomington, six grandchildren, Jessica (Tom) Carpy, Kelsey Sasveld, Zack Delashmit, Hallie (Robert) Bartlett, Lucas Sasveld, Sadie Delashmit, two great-grandchildren Raegan Bartlett and Abigail Carpy, and one sister LaVerne Wolgast of North Tonawanda, NY. Dawn was an Elementary Teacher for thirty-five years mostly in Southern Illinois, including the towns of Bunker Hill, Gillespie, Vandalia, Mount Vernon, Harrisburg, and last teaching in Collinsville Unit District 10, retiring in...

Jun 22, 2019

Here Are The Best Native Plants For Gardens In McLean - McLean, VA Patch

Here are some nearby: Audubon Society of Northern Virginia, 11100 Wildlife Center Drive, Suite 100, Reston, VA 20190Nature By Design: 300 Calvert Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22301Greenstreet Gardens, 1721 West Braddock Road Alexandria, VA 22302Earth Sangha Wild Plant Nursery, 10123 Commonwealth Boulevard Fairfax, VA 22032Americans spent a record $47.8 billion on lawn and garden retail sales in 2017, according to the National Gardening Survey. The average household spent more than $500 on gardening. And while older adults accounted for 35 percent of all gardeners, millennials were getting their hands and knees dirty at all-time high levels. Adults 18-34 accounted for 29 percent of all gardeners, the survey found. Among the recent trends — more people are investing in raised beds as opposed to digging holes, and they're spending money on apps rather than glossy gardening books. Patch national staffer Dan Hampton contributed to this report.

Jun 29, 2017

The new look in floral arrangements: wilder, seasonal, local

Calvert Crary.Ariella Chezar, a designer and flower farmer in upstate New York, is artistic director at the school, which has begun offering “foraging tours” of France and Holland.It’s a big step away from the imported, cut flowers still sold in many florists’ shops.The concept is not entirely new, of course; weeds and seed pods found their way into arrangements for British royals in the 20th century, and the New York flower shop Madderlake and its bouquets of the ‘80s featured roadside weeds and dandelions. But the breadth of the change — partly due to growing environmental consciousness — is changing the entire landscape, experts say.Nicolette Owen of the Little Flower School in Brooklyn, New York, says, “People really want to feel more connected to where their flowers are coming from, and I love the closer contact between florists and growers. In my work, I’ve always been interested in creating arrangements that are a little bit wild. Part of that is highlighting what’s best in the season and what’s around you.“I want the beautifully imperfect, and don’t mind a few freckles on my rose,” she says.Rachael Burrow, style editor of Coastal Living magazine, says she first noticed “the wilder and looser trend in flowers popping up at weddings and in centerpieces a couple years ago, and now it’s really everywhere.“In our photo shoots now, we always go for more naturally arranged and locally sourced florals. It seems to flow better, and that’s the look everyone wants,” she says. (Santa Cruz Sentinel)

Jun 16, 2017

The new look in floral arrangements is wilder, seasonal and local

Calvert Crary.Ariella Chezar, a designer and flower farmer in upstate New York, is artistic director at the school, which has begun offering “foraging tours” of France and Holland.It’s a big step away from the imported, cut flowers still sold in many florists’ shops.The concept is not entirely new, of course; weeds and seed pods found their way into arrangements for British royals in the 20th century, and the New York flower shop Madderlake and its bouquets of the ’80s featured roadside weeds and dandelions. But the breadth of the change — partly due to growing environmental consciousness — is changing the entire landscape, experts say.Nicolette Owen of the Little Flower School in Brooklyn, New York, says, “People really want to feel more connected to where their flowers are coming from, and I love the closer contact between florists and growers. In my work, I’ve always been interested in creating arrangements that are a little bit wild. Part of that is highlighting what’s best in the season and what’s around you.“I want the beautifully imperfect, and don’t mind a few freckles on my rose,” she says.Rachael Burrow, style editor of Coastal Living magazine, says she first noticed “the wilder and looser trend in flowers popping up at weddings and in centerpieces a couple years ago, and now it’s really everywhere.“In our photo shoots now, we always go for more naturally arranged and locally sourced florals. It seems to flow better, and that’s the look everyone wants,” she says.Michele M. Waite, provided by Chronicle BooksErin Benzakein in a field of peonies at North Field Farm in Bellingham, Wash. The photo is featured in Benzakein’s book, “Floret Farm’s Cut Flower Garden.”... (The Denver Post)

Nov 18, 2016

Freeze Warning Overnight: How to Protect Your Plants

DC. And next week it warms up again. Counties in the freeze watch area include: Baltimore, Prince George’s, Anne Arundel, Charles, St. Mary’s, Calvert, Montgomery, Howard, and Harford. The weather service says cities in the alerts include: Washington, DC, Baltimore, Bowie, Suitland-Silver Hill, Clinton, College Park, Greenbelt, Laurel, Camp Springs, Glen Burnie, Annapolis, Severn, South Gate, Severna Park, Arnold, Odenton, Bethesda, Rockville, Gaithersburg, Silver Spring, Columbia, Ellicott City, and Aberdeen. In Virginia, communities in the warning area include: Prince Frederick, Reston, Herndon, Annandale, Centreville, Chantilly, Mclean, Franconia, Arlington and Alexandria. The Weather Service warns: “A freeze watch means sub-freezing temperatures are imminent or highly likely. These conditions will kill crops and other sensitive vegetation.” If you're a gardener, then you've harvested most of your bounty by now, but there are several frost hardy plants that can survive even if the overnight temperatures drop to 28 degrees. So, leeks, scallions, chives, brussels sprouts, broccoli, kale, parsley, beets, carrots, winter squash, pumpkins and sage should be OK, according to the Vegetable Gardener website. Here are some steps you can take when a frost or freeze threatens, according to TodaysHomeowner.com. Bring Indoors: Frost-tender plants in containers should be brought inside during cold weather. Dig up tender bulbs and store them in a cool dry place.Water Plants: Water plants thoroughly before a freeze to prevent desiccation and to add insulating water to the soil and plant cells.Protect Tender Sprouts: Cover tender plants overnight with an ... (Patch.com)

Oct 21, 2016

Most Holy Rosary parishioners offer special gift for their 50th anniversary

Gov. Larry Hogan, the Maryland State Senate and House of Delegates, presented by State Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. (District 27-Calvert, Charles and Prince George’s counties) and Del. Joseph Vallario Jr. (District 23B, Prince George’s County). Father Roger Soley welcomed the cardinal and parishioners to the Oct. 16 anniversary Mass at the parish’s St. Joseph Center, which was followed by a lunch there. The centerpieces at the tables included the phrase, “Together we make a family,” and that reflected the spirit of the gathering and the 250 people in attendance. In his homily, Cardinal Wuerl paid tribute to the roots of faith of that parish community, which traces its beginnings to Boone’s Chapel, which was established in 1710, and a mission church in Upper Marlboro that began in 1859. Most Holy Rosary was established as a parish in 1966. The parish’s wooden church on the corner of Rosaryville Road and Route 301 had its cornerstone laid in 1859, and after a tornado destroyed that church in 1927, members of that faith community helped rebuild it. The cardinal commended the Most Holy Rosary parishioners for “50 years of fidelity to our identity as members of God’s family.” The diverse parish community of different ages and backgrounds held hands as they prayed the Our Father. After Communion, the cardinal blessed rosaries which were given out to parishioners as a commemorative gift. He noted that was especially fitting for Most Holy Rosary Parish, which marked its anniversary in October, the month of the rosary. The cardinal encouraged them to join Mary in uniting their minds and hearts with Jesus’s joys, sorrows and glories as they pray the rosary. Before and after the Mass, Most Holy Rosary parishioners told the Catholic Standard about the special spirit of their faith community. Proctor, a 52-year-old government lobbyist who grew up and received his First Communion there, noted, “This is truly a wonderful community of everyone coming together.” That point was echoed by Alvin Turner, a retired manager for Pepco, who sat and leaned on his cane and noted how black and white parishioners pray and socialize together, and are there for each other. “The white and black community know no difference. It’s a classic example of how integration is supposed to work,” he said. Father J. Isidore Dixon, who grew up on a Charles County farm and served as pastor at Most Holy Rosary for 14 years before becoming the Catholic chaplain at the Armed Forces Retirement Home in Washington, said, “They’re my kind of people, country people.” Don Retzlaff, a parishioner for 46 years, agreed. “I live one-quarter mile from here. It’s small and it’s close, and you get to know everybody. It’s still country here,” said the retired U.S. Army aviator, who with his wife Lorraine raised four children there. Proctor noted how his grandfather, Valette P... (My catholic standard)