Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Texas, TX Florists

Find florist in Texas state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a Texas city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

Texas Cities

Texas State Featured Florists

Wagley Florist

1553 F.M. 54
Littlefield, TX 79339

Bice's Florist

6253 Rufe Snow Dr Ste 805
Watauga, TX 76148

All About Flowers & Gifts

102 W. Main
Edna, TX 77957

Joyce's Flowers

216 South Magnolia Street
Hearne, TX 77859

Bluebonnet Florist

8150 Southwest Freeway Ste F
Houston, TX 77074

Texas Flowers News

Jun 19, 2020

Butterflies and Blooms returns to Green Bay Botanical Garden - WBAY

The exhibit features many butterflies native to Wisconsin, including the Monarch. This year, the garden has added 20 new species coming from Texas, Florida and Mexico. About 300 new butterflies arrive each week. By the end of summer, about 4,500 butterflies are fluttering about the garden. Visitors are allowed to feed the butterflies at any time. Outside the butterfly house is a garden and information on which plants attract butterflies. "Pollinators are important to the ecosystem because they help flowers to make new seeds. That of course helps new plants. But also think about all the foods that we eat that have seeds in them. Our tomatoes, our apples, our peppers. New seeds also grow new seeds for us, too. It's said that one in every three bites of food comes from a pollinator," says Linda Gustke, Education Manager. The exhibit is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. It goes until Aug. 31. Visitors are asked to wear a mask or face covering. CLICK HERE for more information. ...

Jun 19, 2020

Joyce Kerwood Reneau | Obituary - Herald-Banner

Joyce Waunitha Kerwood Reneau was born in Durham, Oklahoma, on Feb. 9, 1932. She died in Longview, Texas, on June 18, 2020. She made her home in Cash, Texas for over 40 years and was a member of the Cash Church of Christ. Joyce married Hayse Willard Reneau on Dec. 10, 1949 and remained a devoted and faithful wife for 70 years. A blessing to all who knew her, she dedicated herself to a lifetime of service to others and dearly loved her family. Joyce was preceded in death by her father and mother, "Sparky" and Minnie Rorabaugh, one brother Joe Kerwood, and one son, Jimmie Reneau. She is survived by her husband Hayse Reneau of Longview, sister Alberta Morris of Levelland, sister Betty Montgomery of Laguna Park, son Ron Reneau of Big Sandy, daughter Donna Best of Longview, and many grand-children, great-grand-children, nieces and nephews and extended family. Visitation will be held at Lynch Funeral Home in Greenville, Texas, Sunday June 21 at 2 p.m. Graveside services will follow at 3 p.m. The family would like to extend their deepest appreciation to the Gilmore family for the love and care they have shown Hayse and Joyce for so many years and to Joyce Davis for her comforting care and attention during the last year. These special people were also dear to our "Granny" and we are forever grateful to them. Published on June 19, 2020 ...

May 1, 2020

Where to see bluebonnets and wildflowers in Dallas-Fort Worth while social distancing - culturemap.com

Mayor Betsy Price — an avid cyclist — has been touting the physical and mental benefits that time spent in the fresh air can bring. Trips to the Texas Hill Country are more than "engaging in outdoor activity," sadly. And many of spring's hottest spots for wildflower-peeping in North Texas are not available this year due to COVID-19 restrictions. The Ennis Bluebonnet Trails are closed, and their beloved annual bluebonnet festival is called off. (Save the date for April 16-18, 2021, they say.) Cedar Hill State Park, normally bursting with color this time of year, is closed, too. And closer to home, Fort Worth Nature Center & Refuge, Botanical Research Institute of Texas (BRIT), and Fort Worth Botanic Garden are not options. Some DFW parks and natural areas that remain open — like Tandy Hills Hills Natural Area in Fort Worth, Clark Gardens Botanical Park in Weatherford, and Cottonwood Park in Irving — are pretty spots for walks among flowers. But parks attract visitors, and visitors attract groups, and groups are a bad thing. What's blooming whereA family drive out to a field or a bike ride down a country road might just be the only real way to view bluebonnets in the age of social distancing. Proska says besides bluebonnets, we'll see Indian paintbrush, Indian blanket, Evening primrose, Mexican Hat, and Coreopsis blooming now. Photo-worthy patches have sprung up along roads in Mansfield, Azle, and areas around Ennis — even if the official trails are closed. According to posts in the Facebook group Texas Bluebonnets and Wildflowers, Indian Paintbrush (which can be various shades of red, white, orange, yellow, and purple) are abundant in far west Fort Worth, off Interstates 30 and 20, toward Weatherford. Each year, bluebonnets paint the landscape along highways 183, 121, and 114 near DFW Airport. And they dot stretches of I-30 within ...

Mar 19, 2020

Syngenta Flowers no longer exhibiting at CAST 2020 - Greenhouse Management

Industry Certified Technician. Prior to opening her own consulting firm in 2001, she worked for Plantscape, Inc. in Pittsburgh, PA and Natura in Texas. While a consultant, she also served as editor and publisher of I-Plants online magazine for nearly a decade, retiring in 2019. As an author, Fediw has written numerous articles for trade journals, association newsletters, training manuals and programs, and several books including “The Manual of Interior Plantscaping” and “Green Plant Care Tips for Techs”. She served on several boards including for OFA, now AmericanHort, Green Plants for Green Buildings, the Certification Council of the National Association of Landscape Professionals, and the USGBC Piney Woods branch.David Korstad has worked in the interior plantscape industry for more than 40 years. Having grown up working at the family nursery, he joined the family business, Sedgefield Landscape Nursery, which later became Sedgefield Interior Landscape, after studying at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The company got its start in interior plantscaping in 1969 after agreeing to its first job for a Westinghouse Corporation facility in Winston-Salem, NC. He moved to Georgia in 1976 to open the Sedgefield Interior Landscapes division where he worked his way up from general manager to president. Semi-retired today, Korstad has served in several industry board positions including as president of the Atlanta Interior Landscape Association (AILA), and held a ten year tenure on the board of directors of the Associated Landscape Contractors of America-Interior Landscape Division/Interior Plantscape Division (ALCA-ILD/IPD). He became chairman of ALCA-ILD in 1986 when the group merged with the Interior Plantscape Association (IPA) to form ALCA-IPD. Additionally, he served as chairman of the ALCA education committee. Korstad was instrumental in the creation of the Foliage Clean Air Council, the forerunner for what is today known as the Green Plants for Green ...

Mar 19, 2020

Edible flowers from the garden - Galveston County Daily News

Other beauties to avoid eating include hydrangea and Texas mountain laurel.Be sure flowers are free of pesticides. Regulations for how to use pesticides on food crops differ from regulations for ornamental crops. Be sure that the rose or pansy flower you have your eye on has not been treated with any pesticides which are illegal to be used on a food crop.Roses, for example, are sometimes treated with a systemic insecticide that is applied to the soil. This should not be regarded as safe for human consumption due to the use of a systemic insecticide that can be present in most or all parts of a plant for several weeks after application.When choosing flowers for edibility, look for those grown safely. Don’t pluck a flower at random from an unfamiliar location or make the assumption that flowers in florist displays are edible.In most cases, the petals are the palatable part of the flowers listed as “edible.” Remove the stamens and pistil from larger flowers such as daylilies (the stamens are covered with pollen, which may aggravate allergies).Reliably edible flowers include calendulas, dandelions, geraniums, nasturtiums, pansies, roses, squash blossoms, and sweet violets. This is only a partial list of edible flowers.One flower that will soon be abundant in many area landscapes is the daylily. While the daylily nowadays is considered a delicacy by wild food gatherers and knowledgeable chefs, it has a long history in Chinese cuisine in addition to Chinese medicine.Daylily flowers can be used in a variety of ways. They add sweetness to soups and vegetable dishes. Flowers that are half opened or fully opened may be dipped in a light batter of flour and water and fried in a wok. You can add the petals to egg dishes and salads. Dried daylily petals, called “golden needles” by the Chinese, are an ingredient in many Chinese recipes, including hot-and-sour soup.Some food preparers have suggested that varieties with pale yellow or orange flowers produce the sweetest, most delectable taste. However, it appears that daylily taste is related to type of cultivar more than flower color according to serious taste trials.Eating flowers is not a weird or unusual gastronomic endeavor. If you like broccoli or cauliflower, or artichoke, then you are already a flower connoisseur since a head of broccoli or cauliflower is composed of a few hundred unopened flowers! The general rule is that the flowers of most herbs and vegetables are safe to eat (with flowers of tomato, potato, eggplant and pepper being notable exceptions). Always check first, because as with anything in life, there will always be exceptions.The guidelines provided here are definitely related to a common sense approach to selecting other types of flowers as food. Adding flower petals to a salad or garnishing a stack of pancakes with a small rose can be fun and effective, but it’s necessary to become informed before ingesting your floral creations.