Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Bloomington, WI

Find local Bloomington, Wisconsin florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Bloomington and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Bloomington Flower Shops

Bloomington WI News

Oct 15, 2020

Dawn Lowe Obituary - Bloomington, IL | The Pantagraph - Legacy.com

BLOOMINGTON - Dawn Pearl Lowe, 94, of Bloomington died at 4:53 PM on Tuesday, September 22, 2020 at Martin Heath Center in Bloomington. There will be a funeral service for Dawn on Saturday, September 26, 2020, at 5 PM at Calvert & Metzler Memorial Home in Bloomington. Reverend Sara Isbell will officiate. There will be a visitation from 3-5 PM at the Memorial Home Saturday. Interment will be later at Camp Butler National Cemetery in Springfield. Dawn was born March 7, 1926, in Milwaukee, WI to Henry and Marie Koktavy Thomsen. She married Rev. Donald L. Lowe on August 12, 1951, in Beloit, WI. He preceded her in death on December 16, 2019 in Normal. She is also preceded in death by one sister, Marilyn Helm. Dawn is survived by two daughters, Debra Sasveld of Naperville, Dauna (Mark) Delashmit of Bloomington, six grandchildren, Jessica (Tom) Carpy, Kelsey Sasveld, Zack Delashmit, Hallie (Robert) Bartlett, Lucas Sasveld, Sadie Delashmit, two great-grandchildren Raegan Bartlett and Abiga...

Feb 28, 2019

Childhood friends from Edina recycle flowers into bouquets of beauty for seniors - Minneapolis Star Tribune

On a cold and snowy day in early February, Laura Hogan and Jill McCarty delivered warmth and a whiff of spring to residents at Wealshire of Bloomington. Hogan and McCarty handed bouquets of vibrant roses, tulips and mums in pint-size Mason jars twined with a tag reading "Thinking of you" to seniors at the memory care facility.

Sep 8, 2017

Flowers for a fall table

I pinched pennies working a few jobs until I was able to pull together the funds open my flower shop. I owned and operated Peppertree Floral here in Bloomington for over 10 years and loved nearly every minute of it. As my kiddos got older the schedule became increasingly more difficult to maintain, so sadly I moved on. Now, years later, I still find myself yearning to clip some stems and create colorful arrangements for my home.This month I got the itch and decided to take a trip to Harvest Moon Flower Farm. The owner, Linda Chapman, walked me through the farm and handpicked some blooms for me to work with. The farm was an inspiration. Fall colors cascading through the rows, sunflowers, dahlias and zinnia in shades of orange, brown and red.Arranging flowers can seem intimidating, but there are a few things to keep in mind to make flower arranging a cinch.Buy qualityStart by purchasing high quality flowers. When you get them home, give them a snip and let them drink in a bucket of warm water.Pick the right size vaseIt’s easy to get frustrated when your flowers keep slumping to the side, but you can avoid this by choosing a container that isn’t too big. If you are doing a tall arrangement gather the stems in your hand and make note of how wide the neck of the vase needs to be to accommodate. With a short, squat arrangement, like this one, look to the flowers heads. The vase should be slightly smaller tha... (The Herald-Times (subscription))

Aug 25, 2017

Fire station flowers add beauty, help insects

Anyone passing by one of the five fire stations in Bloomington may notice colorful purple, orange and yellow flowers outside the stations. What they may not know is that the flowers are more than just a way to beautify the area — they serve as "way stations" for monarch butterflies and other pollinating insects.The flower gardens were started last year by Ann Kamman, a longtime Bloomington resident and gardening enthusiast, after she attended a talk at the Unitarian Universalist Church about the importance of gardens for butterflies and other pollinating insects. She knew about an effort to establish vegetable gardens at the city's fire stations, and asked which firefighter was the "plant person." That's when Kamman began working with Sgt. Brandon Hudson.Together they filled five big pots with milkweed and flowering plants at the downtown Fourth Street fire station. Then Hudson delivered one to each of the other fire stations."I was just trying to get milkweed started wherever I could," Kamman said.This year, each of the five stations... (The Herald-Times (subscription))

Jul 27, 2017

Stanley Bachman grew the family's floral business

Paul, who retired from ­Bachman's last year.Bachman, 93, died on July 15 at Friendship Village in Bloomington.He was born in 1924 in a big house on the Bachman ­family acreage on Lyndale Avenue, where the flagship garden center stands today.After graduating from Washburn High School, he enlisted in the U.S. Coast Guard in 1941 and worked on a transport ship in the Pacific. He never forgot the destruction he witnessed when going on shore after the atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, said Paul.When Bachman was on leave, he met Georgia "GeeGee," who was attending the University of Minnesota."They just fell for each other," said Paul Bachman. The couple married in 1948 and raised two sons in Richfield.Upon returning from his tour of duty, Stanley had planned to pursue a different career, "but Stan realized the value and beauty of plants, flowers and trees," said Dale Bachman, the current CEO. "He said it was the best choice he ever made by re-entering the family business."Stanley Bachman served as a mentor to ambitious employees. He hired Dick Herberg, then a teenager, to work at the Lyndale store. He eventually became the COO, remaining with the company for 47 years."Stan taught me ethics and to always supply the best products for customers," Herberg said.He also was a stickler for details."Dad would walk into a store and find the one plant that hadn't been watered," said Paul Bachman.Active in many retail florist organizations, he was elected to the Society of American Florists Hall of Fame in 1989 for his many contributions."Stan was always available to give other florists advice to help them succeed," said Peter Moran, CEO of the society.After retirement, he served as chairman of the board of directors and continued to plant and maintain his vast vegetable and flower gardens in his Richfield yard.In their 60s, Stanley and Georgia started golfing and took frequent golfing trips until Georgia's death in 2014.Even at age 90, Bachman was tending the gardens on the grounds of Friendship Village senior housing."Stan was more than just a smart businessman," said Herberg. "He was one of the nicest people you'd ever meet on this Earth."Bachman is survived by his two sons, Paul and Pet... (Minneapolis Star Tribune)

Dec 8, 2016

Warwick native turning heads with sunflower study

He then entered graduate school, earning his Ph.D. in Evolutionary Biology and Ecology from Indiana University, Bloomington, in 2009.  After graduating, Blackman was a post-doctoral scholar at Duke University, where he studied how populations of the common monkey flower adapt to local habitats.  Blackman accepted a teaching position at UVA in August of 2012. He taught Ecology of Evolution and Development and a graduate seminar titled “Speciation” at the university until December of 2015.  From UVA, Blackman moved back west, to the San Francisco area, to start a new position, which he currently holds, as an associate professor of the Evolutionary Process at the University of California, Berkeley.  Blackman attributes much of his success to his mentors along his scientific journey, from the junior high school teacher who sparked his interest in biology to those he met during his college and graduate school years.   Blackman says being Jewish also played a role in his success. “One of the major lessons that I took away from my Jewish education in Rhode Island was that part of being Jewish is studying, questioning and explaining, and I think, in part, this influenced me and how I went into science. That is what I do every day. I always want to learn more and am constantly asking questions.”   SAM SERBY, of East Greenwich, attended Temple Sinai, in Cranston. He is a recent graduate of Johnson & Wales University. (Jvhri)