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Nicks Flowers And Party Supply

Order flowers and gifts from Nicks Flowers And Party Supply located in Vancouver WA for a birthday, anniversary, graduation or a funeral service. The address of the flower shop is 2828 E Fourth Plain Blvd, Vancouver Washington 98661 Zip. The phone number is (360) 281-8120. We are committed to offer the most accurate information about Nicks Flowers And Party Supply in Vancouver WA. Please contact us if this listing needs to be updated. Nicks Flowers And Party Supply delivers fresh flowers – order today.

Business name:
Nicks Flowers And Party Supply
Address:
2828 E Fourth Plain Blvd
City:
Vancouver
State:
Washington
Zip Code:
98661
Phone number:
(360) 281-8120
if this is your business: ( update info) (delete this listing)
Express you love, friendship, thanks, support - or all of the above - with beautiful flowers & gifts!

Find Nicks Flowers And Party Supply directions to 2828 E Fourth Plain Blvd in Vancouver, WA (Zip 98661) on the Map. It's latitude and longitude coordinates are 45.6379, -122.640357 respectively.

Florists in Vancouver WA and Nearby Cities

5201 E Fourth Plain
Vancouver, WA 98661
(0.60 Miles from Nicks Flowers And Party Supply)
4103 Oregon Drive
Vancouver, WA 98661
(0.86 Miles from Nicks Flowers And Party Supply)
807 Grand Blvd
Vancouver, WA 98661
(1.04 Miles from Nicks Flowers And Party Supply)
3503 East Evergreen Boulevard
Vancouver, WA 98661
(1.05 Miles from Nicks Flowers And Party Supply)
1300 Washington St
Vancouver, WA 98660
(2.15 Miles from Nicks Flowers And Party Supply)

Flowers and Gifts News

Jul 6, 2021

Where will the Urban Roots Garden Centre be in Coquitlam? - The Tri-City News

A plant nursery that’s proposing to have pop-up garden centres in Port Moody, Vancouver and the township of Langley is also eyeing a high-profile site in Coquitlam. Monday night, city council will have a public hearing to consider a temporary use permit for Urban Roots, the retail side of Canadian Valley Growers that is converting a total of seven empty lots to sell flower baskets, seedlings, annuals, shrubs and gardening accessories. In Coquitlam, the store is proposed for the vacant property east of Coquitlam Centre mall by Walmart; the Morguard land at 1150 The High will be leased until Nov. 30. In Port Moody, council OK’d the temporary use permit by CityState Consulting last month for a pop-up garden facility at the corner of Clarke and Kyle streets, for two years. Other Urban Roots Garden Market locations in the works are at: • 1755 Cottrell St., Vancouver • 2901 East Hastings St., Vancouver • 4506 Rupert St., Vancouver • 6191 West Boulevard, Vancouver • 20090 91A Ave., township of Langley CityState’s Carola Alder told the Tri-City News that the...

Apr 4, 2021

Gardening With Allen: Perennial flowers offer early color - The Columbian

Allen Wilson is a Vancouver gardening specialist. Email Allen Wilson at allenw98663@yahoo.com. Photo I plan to plant more perennial flowers this spring so I don’t have to replant every year. Could you share with us some of your favorite perennial flowers? How do they bloom in comparison to annuals? Perennial flowers are becoming more popular every year as gardeners look for ways to reduce gardening maintenance. Some perennials bloom before it is even warm enough to plant annuals. So they give a welcome addition of early color to supplement our spring-blooming bulbs like daffodils and tulips. Other perennials bloom late in the season, continuing past the time when most annual flowers have finished blooming. However, there are only a few perennials that bloom for as long a period as some of our most popular annual flowers. I have planted a lot of early- and late-blooming perennials, but I have some favorite summer-blooming perennials also. I particularly like the ground-cover perennials ...

Apr 4, 2021

Gardening with Allen: Hardy flowers, veggies to plant now - The Columbian

Allen Wilson is a Vancouver gardening specialist. Email Allen Wilson at allenw98663@yahoo.com. Photo The warm, sunny weather stimulated me to visit a garden store to look for flowers. It was so busy that I had to wait to find a parking space. Yet the weatherman says it is too early to plant flowers because we had a low of 28 degrees. Are there flowers or vegetables that are safe to plant now? Yes, there are both flowers and vegetables that are hardy down to 26 degrees that can be safely planted now. Vegetables are much easier to categorize so we will do those first. If you eat the leaves, roots or flower buds (lettuce, carrots, broccoli) it is a hardy vegetable. There are two exceptions to this rule. Potatoes are not hardy. However, they are often planted at the same time as hardy vegetables because seed potatoes that are planted in the ground don’t come up for about three weeks when temperature is warmer. The second exception is peas and fava beans, which are very hardy. With the exce...

Feb 27, 2020

Gardening with Allen: Now's the time for primroses, candytufts and pansies - The Columbian

Allen Wilson is a Vancouver gardening specialist. Email Allen Wilson at allenw98663@yahoo.com. Photo We have a longer and more colorful bloom period from flowering trees and shrubs in the Pacific Northwest than in most of the United States. One after another tree or shrub flowers during April and May. However, we have a period in late February and March, as weather becomes springlike, when we have more limited bloom. There are a number of ways to fill this bloom gap with flowering plants. Daffodils and other early spring bulbs are very colorful. But you have to remember to plant them in the fall. However, if you forgot to plant, bulbs ready to bloom now are available in containers at garden stores. Blooming primroses are available in stores from January through March. Although these plants are nominally perennials, they seldom make it through to bloom again the next year. Primrose has a short bloom life lasting a month. Pansies provide a lot of color during this early spring period. Pa...

Jan 4, 2020

A new pollinator garden is building buzz in Metro Vancouver | Urbanized - Daily Hive

Places like the new pollinator garden planted by FortisBC in Metro Vancouver last month. FortisBC staff looking at newly planted pollinator garden/FortisBC Located at the foot of Burnaby Mountain trail on the greenspace near the intersection of Broadway and Underhill Avenue, the new garden was designed to attract and support local pollinators. According to Elle, the best time to visit the new garden will be next spring/summer when many of its plants flower. Metro Vancouver’s new pollinator garden is made up of nine different species of plants chosen specifically because pollinators are wild about them. This includes 15 vine maples and hundreds of flowering shrubs and bushes. We’re talking about red elderberry, mock orange, snowberry, thimbleberry, vine maples, Saskatoon serviceberries, yarrow, Nootka rose, and Oregon grape — all of the things a buzzing bee population might need. “This is about so much more than the honeybee. It’s about amazing biodiversity. By planting a diversity of plants, you’re going to support more of that diversity of pollinators, more of those 450 species of bees,” explains Elle. “I would like to see more organizations consider creating pollinator gardens like this when they are completing restoration work – it can really make a big difference.” Elle notes that the plants FortisBC has chosen will provide amazing habitats for pollinators, as well as the food that they need to survive and raise their offspring. “It’s really important for the functioning ecosystem and to protect the pollinators that produce the food that we eat, that the bears eat, and that the birds eat.” Hoping to do your bit to support local wild bee populations at home? You could start by planting pollinator plants like fleabane, spider flowers, foxgloves, artichokes, hollyhocks, and sunflowers. Professor Eliz...

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