Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Vermont, VT Florists

Find florist in Vermont state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a Vermont city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

Vermont Cities

Vermont State Featured Florists

Valley Flower Company Fax

93 Gates St
White River Junction, VT 05001

Kathy's Flowers

2298 Eagle Holw
Corinth, VT 05039

Botanica Florals

10 State St
Montpelier, VT 05602

Just Because Flowers

11 Liberty St
Bristol, VT 05443

Wildflowers Florist And Bee's Hallmark Shop

4574 Main Street
Manchester Center, VT 05255

Vermont Flowers News

Feb 1, 2021

Flowers laid for Dartmouth professors murdered 20 years ago - Beaumont Enterprise

Jetter, a lecturer in Dartmouth’s English department. The professors were stabbed to death in their home in 2001 by two Vermont teenagers who were convicted on murder charges and who are both serving sentences in New Hampshire federal prison. Susanne Zantop was a professor in Dartmouth's German studies department and served as the department's chair and Half Zantop was a professor of Earth sciences, the newspaper reported. The Zantops are survived by their two daughters. Written By ...

Feb 1, 2020

Master Gardener: M is for Michaelmas daisies — asters for fall color - The Daily World

Do it in spring just as new shoots are emerging. New England asters (Symphyotrichum novae-angliae) are native from Vermont to Alabama and west to North Dakota, Wyoming and New Mexico. Stout-stemmed plants 3 to 5 inches tall and almost as wide have blooms that are violet blue in basic form with others in blue shades, white, pink, nearly red and deep purple. Two favorites are Alma Potschke and Harrington’s Pink, each with clear pink single flowers. The New York aster, Aster novi-bellgii, is native to eastern North America (Zones 1-24). It grows 4 feet wide and 3 feet tall with full clusters of bright blue-violet flowers. Among the many choices of A. novi-belgii are Persian Rose (rose pink) and semi-double Professor Kippenburg (lavender blue). The robust Climax variety bears large sprays of single medium-blue blossoms on stems 6 feet tall. Aster x frikartii Monch, native to the Himalayas, is planted in other parts of the perennial beds in my garden. It is upright 16 inches tall and wide with purple blue sprays of 2-inch-wide flowers. Their growth habit differs a bit from many of the above plants and are the finest, most useful and widely adapted of perennials. In large borders or among shrubs, tall asters with their abundant color are invaluable as companion plantings. Hardy chrysanthemums and asters are complementary with their contrasting colors of peach, yellow and rusty reds. Clouds of coreopsis, switch grass and other grasses, black-eyed Susans (Rudbeckia) and the burgundy seed pods of penstemons add to the color until frost arrives. Massing several plants of some of these varieties together creates a delicate balance. At season’s end, a carefully planned palette transitions to blue, gold and burgundy and a colorful finale as winter approaches. This article, by Master Gardener Dolores Cavanah, is part of an occasional series in which she describes the plants she most admires at her expansive garden at Schafer Meadows, east of Montesano. Visit her during the 2020 WSU Master Gardener Garden Tour on July 18. Ramesh NG photo The New York aster (Aster novi-bellgii) grows 4 feet wide and 3 feet tall with full clusters of bright blue-violet flowers.Patrick Standish photo Among the many varieties of New York aster is the Professor Kippenburg, which has lavender-blue blooms.

Dec 18, 2019

Obituary: Storey Lynne Johnson Hart - Montclair Local

She was an active tennis player and enjoyed skiing, fly fishing and riding in the mountains of Vermont and Montana.Her childhood summers were spent fondly with her family at Eagle Camp on Lake Champlain in Vermont. She continued this tradition with her own family through her adult life and was there as recently as this past summer where she got to enjoy time with her family friends and sunset sails with her husband, Andy.Despite her diagnosis in 2013, she fulfilled her lifelong dream of living in the mountains and training horses in Montana where she and her husband built and manage Aspen Ridge Ranch. Her zest for life, her compassion for people and her love for her family and animals allowed her more years than she was given.Mrs. Hart is survived by Douglas Andrew Hart her loving husband of 33 years, daughter Savannah, and sons, Tucker and Gavin. She is predeceased by her parents, Theodore and Francis Johnson, and brother, Theodore D Johnson II.In celebration of her life, the family will be holding a service at 11 a.m. Saturday,Dec. 7, at Union Congregational Church in Upper Montclair.In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to cancer research led by Mrs. Hart’s primary oncologist, Armando Sardi, M.D., at Mercy Medical Foundation, Surgical Oncology Research Fund, 227 St. Paul Place, Baltimore, MD 21202.#mc_embed_signup{background:#fff;clear:left;font:14px Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;width:100%}...

Nov 9, 2019

Realism of Harvard's Glass Flowers still dazzles - Minneapolis Star Tribune

There's a red maple branch, for instance, that looks plucked from a Vermont tree during the fall peak season. There's part of a budding cashew tree boasting two rust-colored cashew apples and drooping nutshells, each leaf vein and stem intricate in detail. These are only two examples of more than 4,300 individual glass models in the collection, which has at least 780 species from the plant kingdom represented. They are affectionately known as the "Glass Flowers," or formally as the Ware Collection of Blaschka Glass Models of Plants. The detail and the anatomical exactness stuns onlookers like Erin Averill, a 26-year-old from Orange County, California, who was recently perusing the flowers.

Aug 22, 2019

Tina Weikert: Selecting flowers for a garden of sweet perfume - The Manchester Journal

Today, its legacy continues. The swing bench presently resides in my Vermont yard. My boys, now readers in their own right, regularly climb onto its wooden lap to read a chapter from their latest library boosk. I show up often too, sliding into its seat in the early morning hours with an afghan for warmth and a pen and paper to write. Truth be told, I am in its embrace now, writing it this love note. I love it to the point that since acquiring it over a year ago, I've desired to adorn it with flowers. To plant fragrantly scented beauties around it so that when pumping my legs to swing, the breeze created will be awash in perfume. A girl can dream! I've set about test planting some aromatic flowers in my yard so that by next summer I will be fully knowledgeable of how to landscape this area. Flower scents were first categorized in 1893 by Count von Marilaun into six groups (later expanded into ten). I struggle with the Count's explanation but have found Dr. Leonard Perry, an extension professor of University of Vermont and contributor to "The Green Mountain Gardener" gives a brilliant outline, which is worth quoting in full: The indole group has flowers smelling like and resembling decayed meat or carrion, such as the skunk cabbage (Lysichiton) and a wake-robin (Trillium erectum), and attracts dung flies for pollination. The aminoid group also smells unpleasant to attract flies, smelling of decayed fish or ammonia, and includes many umbel flowers such as giant fennel. The heavy group smells similar to the last, only sweete...