Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

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Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

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Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections.

Ye Olde Towne Flower Shoppe

Order flowers and gifts from Ye Olde Towne Flower Shoppe located in Mineral VA for a birthday, anniversary, graduation or a funeral service. The address of the flower shop is 600 E. First St, Mineral Virginia 23117 Zip. The phone number is (540) 894-4242. We are committed to offer the most accurate information about Ye Olde Towne Flower Shoppe in Mineral VA. Please contact us if this listing needs to be updated. Ye Olde Towne Flower Shoppe delivers fresh flowers – order today.

Business name:
Ye Olde Towne Flower Shoppe
Address:
600 E. First St
City:
Mineral
State:
Virginia
Zip Code:
23117
Phone number:
(540) 894-4242
if this is your business: ( update info) (delete this listing)
Express you love, friendship, thanks, support - or all of the above - with beautiful flowers & gifts!

Find Ye Olde Towne Flower Shoppe directions to 600 E. First St in Mineral, VA (Zip 23117 ) on the Map. It's latitude and longitude coordinates are 38.0111198425293, -77.9020233154297 respectively.

Florists in Mineral VA and Nearby Cities

201 W Main St
Louisa, VA 23093
(5.89 Miles from Ye Olde Towne Flower Shoppe)
100 S Main St
Gordonsville, VA 22942
(18.18 Miles from Ye Olde Towne Flower Shoppe)
19154 James Madison Highway
Gordonsville, VA 22942
(18.43 Miles from Ye Olde Towne Flower Shoppe)
120 W. Main St
Orange, VA 22960
(20.47 Miles from Ye Olde Towne Flower Shoppe)
307B Madison Road
Orange, VA 22960
(20.99 Miles from Ye Olde Towne Flower Shoppe)

Flowers and Gifts News

Mar 19, 2020

Family struggles with son's death as woman pleads guilty in fatal Littleton crash - Highlands Ranch Herald

Feb. 13. Deanna Bixby, 21, was one of two drivers fleeing police in stolen cars on Feb. 6, 2019, police said. Bixby crashed into a car at Mineral Avenue and Santa Fe Drive going about 100 mph, killing Ryan Carter and Jayne Davicsin. Bixby pleaded guilty on Feb. 13 to two counts of vehicular homicide while driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol, a felony. In exchange for the guilty pleas, prosecutors dropped numerous other charges, including vehicular eluding resulting in death. Under the terms of the plea deal, Bixby will serve 20 years in prison, according to the 18th Judicial District Attorney's Office. The office declined to comment on the case until the sentence is made official in April. The families of Bixby's victims, however, are serving life sentences of a different sort. “We no longer have a son,” said Rod Carter, whose son Ryan, 27, was killed in the crash. “We won't have a daughter-in-law. We won't have grandkids. The Carter name has ended. It's a complete loss for us.” Rod said he still cries regularly when he thinks of his only child. “All our plans changed,” Rod said. “Without a son to be responsible for our finances when we're old, or just help out around the house, it's all thrown away.” Rod's wife Tracy said Ryan'...

Feb 1, 2020

Growth in Gardening: The healing power of nature - San Marcos Daily Record

Taste is the obvious one. We taste the fruit and vegetables we eat. They contain nutrition in the form of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, phytonutrients and so forth. The array of different tastes achieved from a wide variety of plants is overwhelming — bitter, acidic, sweet, and so on; almost all offer an astonishing array of health benefits too. Sight is one of the defining elements of plants due to the fact that they can help alter our moods. Looking at and being surrounded by nature can be hugely calming and restorative for the mind. One oft repeated study by the National Center for Biotechnology Information has shown that surgery patients recover faster, have fewer complications, require less pain medication, and return home sooner, when they are able to look out a window onto a scene of nature’s beauty rather than a wall, cityscape or such as they heal. Hearing is through the wind or mechanical movement of flower heads, seed pods or leaves. We can find solitude and comfort in these sounds; they are calming and tranquil. One of the most recommended ways for busy people to de-stress is to take time out to listen to music. I would argue that there is no music in the world as sweet and pleasing as that of nature itself. “I work like a gardener,” the great painter Joan Miró wrote in his meditation on the proper pace for creative work. Indeed, to garden and even merely to be in a garden, is nothing less than a triumph of resistance against the merciless race of modern life, so compulsively focused on productivity at the cost of creativity, of lucidity, of sanity; a reminder that we are creatures enmeshed with the great web of being, in which, as the naturalist John Muir observed long ago, “when we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe;” a return to what is noblest, which means most natural, in us. There is something deeply humanizing in listening to the rustle of a newly leaved tree, in watching a bumblebee romance a blossom, in kneeling onto the carpet of soil to make a hole for a tomato transplant, gently moving a startled earthworm or two out of the way. Walt Whitman knew this when he weighed what makes life worth living as he convalesced from a paralytic stroke: “After you have exhausted what there is in business, politics, conviviality, love, and so on — I have found that none of these finally satisfy, or permanently wear — what remains? Nature remains; to bring out from their torpid recesses, the affinities of a man or woman with the open air, the trees, fields, the changes of seasons — the sun by day and the stars of heaven by night.” Simply put, the human spirit longs to be a part of nature and not apart from nature. I would highly encourage you to get out into your garden or visit the many wonderful gardens that can be found nearby, such as the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center or Austin’s Zilker Park, or the San Antonio Botanical Gardens. All amazing day trip locations. I promise that you won’t feel worse for the visit. -- Joe Urbach is the publisher of GardeningAustin.com and the Phytonutrient Blog. He has lived in the Central Texas area for over 30 years.

Nov 9, 2019

Sunstone Spa Shows the Healing Power of the Rose - Palm Springs Life

When You Go Sunstone Spa at Agua Caliente Casino Rancho Mirage32250 Bob Hope Drive,Rancho Mirage, 888-999-1995Open 9 a.m.–7 p.m.hotwatercasino.com Appearing at least 35 million years ago in the fossil record and growing naturally throughout North America and beyond, the rose has been prized by many civilizations around the world. For centuries, the flower served as an important ingredient in Persian traditional medicine, and archaeologists have even uncovered petrified rose wreaths in Egyptian tombs. For the ancient Greeks and Romans, roses symbolized love and beauty; the Romans filled their cities with lush rose gardens, crowned newlyweds with roses, covered banquet tables with the petals, and used the flowers as currency. Rose petals, rose water, and rose extract were also active elements in early facial masks, eye shadows, and blush. It may come as a surprise to some that the rose is even a winter delicacy for wild birds and others animals. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, as the science of beauty grew more sophisticated and the benefits of rose oil extract became more known, the product became widely available in perfumes, lotions, soaps, and creams. Today, it remains one of the most treasured and effective natural ingredients in luxury skincare and spa treatments, with the Moroccan rose extract being one of the most sought-after throughout the world. • READ NEXT: Exp...

Oct 10, 2019

PlantShed New York Celebrates One Year Anniversary At One Prince Street - PerishableNews

HaND offers seasonally-inspired beverages featuring homemade flower and herb infusions, tinctures, fruits, roots, minerals, adaptogens, and add-ons such as tonic shots as well as homemade flower and herb infusion shots. During the upcoming anniversary weekend, guests will have the opportunity to explore the techniques of building hand-tied bouquets or join PlantShed’s horticulturalists in boosting their plant knowledge while sampling the company’s freshly updated fall menu of café beverages. Below, you will find the full weekend line-up of events. To reserve a spot in an anniversary weekend workshop, guests can RSVP at PLANTSHED@LERPR.COM, as space will be limited. The new fall menu will be offered all three days with an in-store floral installation on Saturday. Thursday, October 17th 11am: Kokedama Workshop – A creative workshop to learn the history and art of Kokedama.3pm: Terrarium Workshop – A creative workshop to design and build your own garden in glass.6pm – 8pm: Invite-Only Press Kick-Off Event Friday, October 18th 11am: Flower Crown Workshop – Create a floral crown using the seasons best foliage and blooms.3pm: Espresso Tasting – Informative talk on the difference between espresso drinks, American machiatto, cortado, and beyond. Saturday, October 19th 11am:Matcha & Tea Tasting and Demonstration – Join our baristas as they steep tea while steaming milk for fullest flavors. This demo will highlight Instagram-worthy latte designs and earthy, vibrant colors with natural flavors.1pm: Hand-Tied Bouquet Workshop – Learn the art and technique around building a hand-tied bouquet with seasonal blooms and foliage.5pm: Repotting + Houseplants 101 – Learn step by step basics on repotting while gaining a deeper understanding on indoor tropical plants. PlantShed debuted their floral cafes in 2018 in both Nolita and the Upper West Side. The concept introduced a unique retail experience incorporating both a traditional floral and plant shop with a wellness-focused cafe. Challenging what a conventional retail space should entail, PlantShed’s floral cafes emphasize a lifestyle centered around nature. A lush oasis filled with tropical foliage, cacti and succulents along with premium flowers sourced from all over the world creates a space where busy New Yorkers can slow down and embrace café culture in its most uniq...

Oct 10, 2019

October Companion Plants and the Soil They Love - Prescott eNews

The ideal garden soil has the right texture, composition, drainage, acidity, and mineral density. Determine any faults of your gardens' soils, correct those faults, and any plants in the proper soil will want to grow heartily, no matter the season. Get this balance of desirable traits even close to ideal, and your gardening successes will increase noticeably. Guaranteed! Here are four easy DIY tests for the average homeowner to make a garden's soil assessment: Soil is classified as clay, sandy, or loamy. Clay is nutrient-rich, but slow draining. Sand is quick draining but has trouble retaining nutrients and moisture. Loam is considered the ideal soil because it retains moisture and nutrients but isn't soggy. Squeeze Test - One of the most fundamental characteristics of soil is its composition. To determine your soil type, take a handful of moist soil from your garden, and give it a firm squeeze. Then, open your hand. One of three things will happen: 1 - It holds its shape, and when you give it a light poke, it crumbles. This means you have the perfect rich loam. 2 - It holds its shape, and when poked sits stubbornly in your hand. This means you have clay soil, and not ideal for optimal growing conditions. 3 - It falls apart as soon as you open your hand. This means you have sandy soil that needs amending with more Barnyard Manure or Premium Mulch. Once you know what soil type you have, you can work to improve it. Worm Test - Worms are significant indicators of the health of garden soil, especially concerning biological activity. If you have earthworms, the chances are you also have all of the beneficial microbes and bacteria that make for healthy soil and vigorous plants. To do a worm test: 1 - Be sure the soil has warmed to at least 55 degrees, and is somewhat moist. 2 - Dig a hole one foot, by one foot, by one foot deep. Place the soil on a tarp or a piece of cardboard. 3 - Sift your soil as you place it back into the hole, counting the earthworms as you go along. If you find at least ten worms, your soil is considered good. Less than that indicates there isn't enough organic matter in your soil to suppo...

Jun 22, 2019

Floral and lush, this $12 South African white wine blend blossoms in your glass - The Washington Post

Old World sensibility — the oak is beautifully integrated to give structure and tannin to the wine, the alcohol is in check, and there’s a mineral undertone that suggests a fine bordeaux. Pair this with the next large hunk of beef you grill for a summer party. ABV: 14 percent.Imported by Artisans & Vines. Distributed in the District by Hop & Wine, in Maryland by Artisans & Vines, and in Virginia by Hop & Wine and LK Wine Tours & Sales. Available in the District at MacArthur Beverages, Rodman’s. Available in Maryland at Bethesda Co-Op in Cabin John, Bradley Food & Beverage and Georgetown Square Wine and Beer in Bethesda, Finewine.com and the Wine Harvest in Gaithersburg, Takoma Park-Silver Spring Co-Op in Takoma Park. Available in Virginia at Aldie Peddler in Aldie, Locke Store in Millwood, Murphy Beverage in Winchester, Vienna Vintner in Vienna. Gone Rogue Mish Mash White 2018 Great Southern, Australia, $23 This delicious riot of a wine — designed to appeal to iconoclasts of all ages — is a blend of riesling and pinot grigio, with a dash of viognier tossed in for good measure (and, well, aromas and body). That recipe corresponds to none of the paradigms of the wine world, but it succeeds with a frenzy of flavor, balance and fun. Both the name and label encourage us to “go rogue” and defy limitations. ABV: 13 percent.Imported by Artisans & Vines. Distributed in the District by Hop & Wine, in Maryland by Artisans & Vines, and in Virginia by Hop & Wine and LK Wine Tours & Sales. Available in the District at Rodman’s. Available in Maryland at Balducci’s and Bradley Food & Beverage in Bethesda, Crescent Beer & Wine in Bowie, Downtown Crown Wine and Beer in Gaithersburg, the Market at River Falls in Potomac, the Wine Harvest (Gaithersburg, Potomac). Available in Virginia at Aldie Peddler in Aldie, Balducci’s (Alexandria, McLean, Reston), Bonnie Blue Southern Market & Bakery and Murphy Beverage in Winchester, Vintage Wines in Harrisonburg, Rio Hill Wine & Beer in Charlottesville. GREAT VALUE Smith & Perry Pinot Noir 2015 Oregon, $15 Here’s an all-around tasty Oregon pinot noir, with Bing cherry and sarsaparilla flavors. It may be easy to finish this without realizing it, but you’ll want to savor this wine and save some for dinner. Distributed by Republic National: Available in the District at Ace Beverage, Circle Wine & Liquor, Rodman’s, Yes! Organic Market (various locations). Available in Maryland at Pine Orchard Liquors in Ellicott City, Wine Source in Baltimore. Availability information is based on distributor records. Wines might not be in stock at every listed store and might be sold at additional stores. Prices are approximate. Check Winesearcher.com to verify availability, or ask a favorite wine store to order through a distributor. More from Food: Wine ...

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