Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Independence, VA

Find local Independence, Virginia florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Independence and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Independence Flower Shops

Blooming Treasures Flowers Gifts & Such

111 Courthouse St
Independence, VA 24348
(276) 773-2837

Independence Florist And Gifts

126 E Main St
Independence, VA 24348
(276) 773-3689

Independence VA News

Feb 1, 2020

Community Connections Awarded Grant to Expand Flower Angels Mission - Cape Cod Today

Flower Angels’ services. Community Connections provides comprehensive programs and life-enriching services that promote optimal independence for people with all types of disabilities, helping them to lead healthier, more fulfilling lives and promoting inclusion within the communities where they live. Flower Angels delivers more than 200 bouquets each week to nursing homes and hospice organizations across Cape Cod. Community Connections has been a proud supporter of Flower Angels since its inception in 2014. Today, Community Connections clients from the South Yarmouth program help by bringing flowers to the Flower Angels workshop and participating in flower deliveries to the elderly on Cape Cod who are often overlooked. “Our goal is to further increase community inclusion for the elderly and people with disabilities,” said David Botting, President and CEO, Community Connections Inc. “Specifically, we want to expand Flower Angels’ services to reach more recipients, engage with other community groups and offer vocational skills for Community Connections clients who may have limited employment opportunities.” About the Author » ...

Aug 22, 2019

A critic looks at the best gardens near the National Mall in DC - Washington Post

Kusama’s polka-dot-covered “Pumpkin,” center, are on display at the manicured Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Across the wide expanse of Independence Avenue SW from the Mary Livingston Ripley Garden is Earth Day Park , its homelier twin along the axis of the Ninth Street Expressway. It is less green, less tended and more basic in its plantings, and the noise of cars is ever present. But it is land reclaimed from the nihilism of concrete and one is thankful for it, warts and all. The park also leads to Hancock Park behind the Federal Aviation Administration building, a tree-filled rectangle that wants some love, but is delightful, none the less, for being so hidden and so off the usual tourist’s track. [Here’s what might have been built in Washington, but wasn’t] The older buildings along the Mall were often raised above street level, on plinths, a now out-of-fashion design idea that nevertheless encouraged the incorporation of garden spaces that stand apart from the civic topography. Some of these offer ideal escapes. Along the south face of the National Gallery of Art’s West Building are two large fountains, surrounded by garden enclosures, and you might pass by them a thousand times without noticing how inviting they are. If you want to eat a sandwich, or just take a break from a run or a bike ride, climb the steps and find space on one of the benches nestled in the embrace of the old, neoclassical building. The Mall and all its tumult will seem a thousand miles away. Marvin Joseph The Washington Post “The Great Warrior of Montauban,” center, by Antoine Bourdelle, is one of several artworks in the Hirshhorn Museum’s lovely walled sculpture garden. Some of the grander buildings along the north side of the Mall also offer green hideaways. Along Constitution Avenue from 19th to 23rd streets NW, are several gardens, some mere ornaments to the institutional facades they complement, but others genuinely inviting. The tone of National Academy of Sciences’ front yard is set by Albert Einstein himself, whose statue sits rumpled, and at ground level, in the southwest corner of its green space. On the other side of the front garden is a lovely outdoor arbor. [The best times to visit the monuments and memorials on the Mall] Some of these institutional front yards look onto one of the great, unrealized possibilities of the Mall, which is Constitution Gardens , an ill-tended and careworn park that was dedicated in 1976. This is land reclaimed from the Potomac River, and it is full of potential. There is a gentle rise and fall to the landscape, and a large, shallow lake. But the lake is filthy and the water is green, and the humble but evocative memorial to the signers of the Declaration of Independence is unkempt. There are plans to refurbish the park and build a new pavilion (an unnecessary intrusion). But nothing has happened yet. The same is true for President’s Park to the north, which connects the Mall to the White House grounds. It could be one of the most beautiful places in the city but is now merely a wasteland of provisional security barriers. [a data-xslt="_http" href="https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwi26tzy9YTkAhWQtlkKHahaD-0QFjAAegQIARAB&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Flifestyle%2Fstyle%2Fforget-the-tanks-trumps-violation-of-the-lincoln-memorial-is-the-real-offense%2F2019%2F07%2F03%2F23c0894c-9da9-11e9-9ed4-c9089972ad5a_stor...

Jul 26, 2019

American-grown fashionable flowers on display: See Oregon's floral portrait - OregonLive

U.S.? For the fifth year, the petal promoters who organize American Flowers Week in the days leading up to America’s Independence Day have revealed a field-fresh and runway-ready couture collection. --Janet Eastman 503-294-4072 jeastman@oregonian.com @janeteastman Missy Palaco Oregon’s floral garment is an autumnal-hued, fringed frock of seasonal and dried mums while California’s is a skateboard-accommodating mod Gerbera daisy dress. Washington state’s dahlia-bedecked cloak was inspired by 18th-century patchwork quilts and Native American blankets. [Dahlia Cape by Tammy Myers, First & Bloom, Seattle] Missy Palaco American Flowers Week, June 28-July 4, promotes domestic flowers and foliage, encouraging everyone to look beyond ubiquitous imported roses and carnations. In June and July, every state in the U.S. is producing flowers to decorate cozy breakfast tables to splashy wedding receptions, each stem selected, in a very personal way, for its color, size and beauty. Locally grown, fresh-cut flowers last longer and support the regional economy, says American flowers advocate and journalist Debra Prinzing of Seattle, who started the free, online Slowflowe...

May 31, 2019

Slow Flowers Announces 2019 American Flowers Week - PerishableNews

As an advocacy effort, the campaign coincides with America’s Independence Day on July 4th, providing florists, retailers, wholesalers and flower farmers a patriotic opportunity to promote American grown flowers.About Debra Prinzing: Debra Prinzing is a Seattle-based writer, speaker and leading advocate for American Grown Flowers. Through her many Slow Flowers-branded projects, she has convened a national conversation that stimulates consumers and professionals alike to make conscious choices about their floral purchases. Debra is the producer of SlowFlowers.com, the online directory to American grown farms, florists, shops and studios who supply domestic and local flowers. Each Wednesday, approximately 2,500 listeners tune into Debra’s “Slow Flowers Podcast,” available for free downloads at her web site, debraprinzing.com, or on iTunes and via other podcast services. She is the author of 10 books, including Slow Flowers and The 50 Mile Bouquet. ...

Oct 12, 2018

ForestKraft Gives A Second Life To Flowers

I look down for botanical material, she adds. Growing, processing and selling dried flowers could put many women on the path to self-employment, independence, and financial freedom. Many women like Shalu Walia are thinking differently. Fashion Yatra, widely known as "Fashion with a cause" is in its 7th year presents an exquisite collection of Jewelry from renowned Ghanasingh Be True, the 109-year-old, renowned Indian jewellery house. Ghanasingh Be True is a legendary jewellery brand in India. Mango Haram by Kalash Fine Jewellery costs Rs 11.5 lakhs This year the proceeds from Fashion Yatra will go to Teach For Change- Educating underprivileged. Ten kids from the NGO graced the inaugural function. Sharing details of the exhibition, Kamini Saraf, said Fashion Yatra is one of the biggest of its kind, showcasing designer garments, Jewelry and lifestyle products from all over India. 70 designers from all over India are expected to participate in the exhibition and showcase their creations. Teach For Change Kids seen inaugurating Fashion Yatra figure id="attachment_63768" class="wp-caption alignno...

Jul 6, 2018

This year's Ojai Valley Lavender Festival celebrates survival as well as purple blooms

Ojai's Libbey Park. Read more: More events this weekend and on Independence Day Never 30 podcast: The mystique of Ojai All the lavender farmers participating in the festival this year suffered in some way from the Thomas Fire, said Maureen Volland, who handles publicity for the event. The nuns who grow lavender at St. Barbara's Monastery in Santa Paula lost many of their plants, she said, although local growers helped replace some of what they lost. Other farmers saw their lavender blooms delayed because of the heat and smoke. Nevertheless, the farms have recovered sufficiently in time for this Saturday's celebration, she said. Visitors to the festival will be able to buy live lavender plants, fresh and dried lavender bundles, wreaths, sachets and various lavender products including soaps, lotions and oils. A sixth farm, Frog Creek Lavender Farm in Upper Ojai, will host offsite tours where visitors can pick bundles of fresh lavender themselves. "People love the festival," Volland said. "You enter Ojai and you can smell the lavender; it's beautiful. The whole town participates: Local restaurants serve lavender-flavored menu items; merchants in town offer lavender specials. It's come to be quintessentially Ojai." Besides the lavender growers, more than 100 vendors will be on hand at the festival, selling a wide variety of products including gourmet oils and balsamic vinegars, specialty lavender lemonade, baked goods and non-alcoholic cocktail mixers and salts. The celebrations will include live music throughout the day, a lavender-themed art show, food trucks, games, prizes and raffles. Featured speakers will include ecological landscaper Laura Maher of Greywater Gardens, who will present "How to Design, Build and Maintain a Greywater Irrigation System for Your Home Garden" at noon. Artist and musician turned health advocate Amanda Mullins will present "Make Your Favorite Foods Nutritious and Delicious" at 2 p.m. Money raised from the festival will go toward agriculture-related scholarships and grants for area residents. This year, the festival awarded a $2,000 student scholarship and $7,000 in community grants to local homeowners to restore landscaping destroyed or damaged by the Thomas Fire, including the Luboffs. "These people lost basically everything, so we were really thrilled to be able to provide a little something," Volland said. "It wasn't huge, but it was just enough to be able to replant something of what they lost." For the Luboffs, the fire has taken a toll both economically and emotionally, said Tony Luboff. But the family is looking forward to returning to the lavender festival this year and eventually regaining what they've lost. "The Thomas Fire did not help us one bit, but it's going to make us stronger," he said. "We'll come back stronger and better than ever." If you go What: Ojai Valley Lavender FestivalWhen: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. SaturdayWhere: Libbey Park in downtown OjaiAdmission: FreeParking: Off-site parking, also free and with complimentary shuttle service to the festival, is available at Live Oak Christian Fellowship Church, 441 Church Road; last bus leaves the park at 5 p.m.Information: www.ojailavenderfestival.orgAlso: Frog Creek Farm, an organic lavender farm in Upper Ojai, will offer off-site pick-your-own lavender tours from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on festival day and again on Lavender Sunday, July 1, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., with a special lavender-growing talk and lavender wand-making workshop from 11 a.m. to noon. Information: www.frogcreekojai.com Let's b...