Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Virginia, VA Florists

Find florist in Virginia state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a Virginia city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

Virginia Cities

Virginia State Featured Florists

Crewe Florist & Gift

111 W Carolina Ave
Crewe, VA 23930

Sunshine Florist & Gifts

2303 Gorgas Rd
Fort Belvoir, VA 22060

Adorn Floral & Gifts

1301 Orange Rd
Culpeper, VA 22701

Ideal Florist

121 Mill St
Hillsville, VA 24343

All About Flowers & Gifts

110 North Main Street
Bridgewater, VA 22812

Virginia Flowers News

Feb 1, 2020

Mosquitoes Are Drawn to Flowers As Much as People — Now Scientists Finally Know Why - SciTechDaily

Riffell’s team, which includes researchers at the UW, Virginia Tech and UC San Diego, has discovered the chemical cues that lead mosquitoes to pollinate a particularly irresistible species of orchid. As they report in a paper published online on December 23, 2019, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the orchid produces a finely balanced bouquet of chemical compounds that stimulate mosquitoes’ sense of smell. On their own, some of these chemicals have either attractive or repressive effects on the mosquito brain. When combined in the same ratio as they’re found in the orchid, they draw in mosquitoes as effectively as a real flower. Riffell’s team also showed that one of the scent chemicals that repels mosquitoes lights up the same region of the mosquito brain as DEET, a common and controversial mosquito repellant. Their findings show how environmental cues from flowers can stimulate the mosquito brain as much as a warm-blooded host — and can draw the mosquito toward a target or send it flying the other direction, said Riffell, who is the senior author of the study. The researchers used bags placed over the orchids to collect samples of their scents in the field. Credit: Kiley Riffell The blunt-leaf orchid, or Platanthera obtusata, grows in cool, high-latitude climates across the Northern Hemisphere. From field stations in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest in Washington state, Riffell’s team verified past research showing that local mosquitoes pollinate this species, but not its close relatives that grow in the same habitat. When researchers covered the flowers with bags — depriving the mosquitoes of a visual cue for the flower — the mosquitoes would still land on the bagged flowers and attempt to feed through the canvas. Orchid scent obviously attracted the mosquitoes. To find out why, Riffell’s team turned to the individual chemicals that make up the blunt-leaf orchid’s scent. “We often describe ‘scent’ as if it’s one thing — like the scent of a flower, or t...

Feb 1, 2020

Local flower shop continues to bloom | News - Fauquier Times

Virginia Gerrish and her husband David purchased Designs by Teresa because they didn’t want Warrenton to lose another long-standing business. TIMES STAFF PHOTOS/JAMES IVANCIC David and Virginia Gerrish purchased the florist business on Oct. 31 and decided to keep the business’s well-known name. Former owner Teresa Bowles has been helping out during the transition, but she’ll be stepping aside to enjoy a well-deserved retirement.The two full-time employees and one part-timer are continuing in their roles. “It’s the same people delivering the same service and high-quality product,” said Virginia Gerrish during an interview during the week after Christmas -- when the business was closed.She and her husband bought the shop as well as the building it occupies at 7 Main St., which includes office space and an apartment upstairs.Bowles explained it was time to enjoy life outside of running the florist shop. “I’ve been doing the same thing for 51 years. I worked for my aunt for 16 years and as soon as she passed away, I opened my own shop. I never had another job,” said Bowles.Retirement gives her a chance to do some things she never had time to do … simple things like getting together with friends, for example.“I actually have got time to go out to dinner with friends,” Bowles said. “Friends of mi...

Feb 1, 2020

Mosquitoes are drawn to flowers as much as people — and now scientists know why - UW News

Riffell’s team, which includes researchers at the UW, Virginia Tech and UC San Diego, has discovered the chemical cues that lead mosquitoes to pollinate a particularly irresistible species of orchid. As they report in a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the orchid produces a finely balanced bouquet of chemical compounds that stimulate mosquitoes’ sense of smell. On their own, some of these chemicals have either attractive or repressive effects on the mosquito brain. When combined in the same ratio as they’re found in the orchid, they draw in mosquitoes as effectively as a real flower. Riffell’s team also showed that one of the scent chemicals that repels mosquitoes lights up the same region of the mosquito brain as DEET, a common and controversial mosquito repellant. The researchers used bags placed over the orchids to collect samples of their scents in the field.Kiley Riffell Their findings show how environmental cues from flowers can stimulate the mosquito brain as much as a warm-blooded host — and can draw the mosquito toward a target or send it flying the other direction, said Riffell, who is the senior author of the study. The blunt-leaf orchid, or Platanthera obtusata, grows in cool, high-latitude climates across the Northern Hemisphere. From field stations in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest in Washington state, Riffell’s team verified past research showing that local mosquitoes pollinate this species, but not its close relatives that grow in the same habitat. When researchers covered the flowers with bags — depriving the mosquitoes of a visual cue for the flower — the mosquitoes would still land on the bagged flowers and attempt to feed through the canvas. Orchid scent obviously attracted the mosquitoes. To find out why, Riffell’s team turned to the individual chemicals that make up the blunt-leaf orchid’s scent. “We often describe ‘scent’ as if it’s one thing — like the scent of a flower, or the scent of a person,” said Riffell. “Scent is actually a complex combination of chemicals — the scent of a rose consis...

Jan 4, 2020

Death Notices - The Daily World

Edwards Memorial. Kathleen M. “Kathy” (Ask) Short Kathleen M. “Kathy” (Ask) Short, 67, died on Thursday, Dec. 26, 2019, at Virginia Mason Medical Center in Seattle. She was born on Aug. 22, 1952, in Aberdeen to Delbert Eugene and Norma Jean (Ask) Finch. Kathy and Fred owned and operated Fred’s Auto Body in Hoquiam. A celebration of her life will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 11, 2020, at the Aberdeen Rotary Log Pavilion. A complete obituary will be published in a later edition of The Daily World. Direction is by the Coleman Mortuary, 422 5th Street in Hoquiam. ...

Jan 4, 2020

Flowers are a great last-minute gift — but be sure to send the right message - Seattle Times

On Flowers: Lessons From an Accidental Florist.” (Tif Hunter) Ashley Greer, owner of Atelier Ashley Flowers in Alexandria, Virginia, said clients tend to get stressed about their flower choices. “Some people are very self-conscious when it comes to flowers and their impressions,” Greer says. “People think that the flowers they use at an event or that they send are a direct reflection on them. And they want to be careful that their arrangement reflects their taste, their style and the occasion.” Advertising Condolence flowers may be what people most obsess about. “When you are sending something for a funeral you want to be sensitive,” Greer says. “Sometimes people say they don’t want to send anything that looks fun. They prefer something white and green.” Dowling, whose studio is in Alexandria, says condolence flowers “don’t have to be all white. Having flowers that are soft and comforting and focus on texture is a good way to go. Make them personal, and possibly reflecting a certain flower the person loved. Then they can really evoke the sense of a warm hug.” New York flower designer and illustrator Cathy Graham says her go-to sympathy flowers include a paperwhite plant and a white or blue hydrangea plant that could bloom for a few weeks. “You don’t have to do all white, but I would not use bright, festive colors.” Don’t overlook household pets when you are creating a bouquet or arrangement to send to someone, says Graham. “Lilies and other flowers are bad for cats,” says Graham, who worries about that with her own two ginger cats, Reggie and Cheddar. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals publishes a list of plants that are poisonous to pets. img data-ratio="1.50037" data-caption="Included in this Atelier Ashley Flowers design for a baby shower are ranunculus, which mean radiant charm. It never hurts to let a woman who is about to give birth know that she is radiant, owner Ashley Greer says. (SKC Photography)" class alt="Included in this Atelier Ashley Flowers design for a baby shower are ranunculus, which mean radiant charm. It never hurts to let a woman who is about to give birth know that she is radiant, owner Ashley Greer says. (SKC Photography)" src="https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/design-flowers-ba15b5bc-00a9-11ea-8501-2a7123a38c58-780x520.jpg" srcset="https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/design-flowers-ba15b5bc-00a9-11ea-8501-2a7123a38c58-300x200.jpg 300w, https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/design-flowers-ba15b5bc-00a9-11ea-8501-2a7123a38c58-768x512.jpg 768w, https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/design-flowers-ba15b5bc-00a9-11ea-8501-2a7123a38c58-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/design-flowers-ba15b5bc-00a9-11ea-8501-2a7123a38c58-780x520.jpg 780w, https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/design-flowers-ba15b5bc-00a9-11ea-8501-2a7123a38c58-1020x680.jpg 1020w, https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/design-flowers-ba15b5bc-00a9-11ea-8501-2a7123a38c58-1560x1040.jpg...