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Adams Apple Inc

Order flowers and gifts from Adams Apple Inc located in Philadelphia PA for a birthday, anniversary, graduation or a funeral service. The address of the flower shop is Gallery I, Philadelphia Pennsylvania 19107 Zip. The phone number is (215) 238-1807. We are committed to offer the most accurate information about Adams Apple Inc in Philadelphia PA. Please contact us if this listing needs to be updated. Adams Apple Inc delivers fresh flowers – order today.

Business name:
Adams Apple Inc
Address:
Gallery I
City:
Philadelphia
State:
Pennsylvania
Zip Code:
19107
Phone number:
(215) 238-1807
if this is your business: ( update info) (delete this listing)
Express you love, friendship, thanks, support - or all of the above - with beautiful flowers & gifts!

Find Adams Apple Inc directions to Gallery I in Philadelphia, PA (Zip 19107) on the Map. It's latitude and longitude coordinates are 39.9519865457327, -75.1557412313517 respectively.

Florists in Philadelphia PA and Nearby Cities

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Flowers and Gifts News

Oct 15, 2020

If a sunflower blooms in a city, does it make a difference? - Columbia Chronicle

When Sunflower City was created eight years ago, only a handful of sunflowers were planted. Similar to an initiative in Philadelphia where vacant lots were turned into green spaces, Sunflower City was created to demonstrate what it means to heal the environment and a community. McHugh has a background in clean energy and once created fuel out of cooking oil. He wanted to test what growing a biofuel crop in contaminated soil would do. “We looked at sunflowers grown in contaminated soils and if we could produce a seed oil that remained free of lead and other contaminants,” McHugh said. Sunflowers were chosen because they can grow well even in contaminated soils, McHugh said. They can also contribute to clean energy and product development through the use of sunflower oil. The experiment soon became secondary, McHugh said. When the sunflower heads turned downward for the first time in 2012, McHugh knew it was time to harvest them. But he found the residents of the Washington Park neighborhood wanted the sunflower patch to become a permanent fixture. “Over time, I realized that there was something more important than a technical-scientific research project,” McHugh said. “There was something that took precedence over that, and that was what can natural beauty do for neighborhoods.” In addition to being beneficial for wildlife, green spaces in urban areas are also important for “our own human benefit and emotional well-being” to break up what is otherwise a concrete jungle, said Michele Hoffman-Trotter, adjunct faculty member in the Science and Mathematics Department. In Chicago, groups such as Chicago Eco House, 6439 S. Peoria St., are using urban agriculture to beautify ne...

Oct 15, 2020

Florists 'bomb' Philly mailboxes for 2020 election ballots - WHYY

Called Porch Petals, Love keeps the delivery radius tight – she only services Philadelphia’s Northwest neighborhoods near her farm. To her surprise, it worked. Porch Petals caught on and saved her business. Floral designer Diane Floss (left) and Jennie Love of Love and Fresh Flowers decorated the mailbox at Germantown Avenue and Bethlehem Pike with a rainbow of flowers for the United by Blooms event. (Emma Lee/WHYY) “Porch Petals is a COVID pivot, but it proves our community here in Chestnut Hill and Mt. Airy – they are phenomenal. I would start weeping if I think about it too much,” she said. “This community saved our farm.” Love is fortunate that she is both a grower and an arranger: she supplies herself. Other florists who rely on shipped flowers have fared much worse as international supply chains have broken down during the global pandemic. Flowers, after all, cannot sit in warehouses. United By Blooms is ostensibly a get-out-the-vote campaign addressing anxieties about voting by mail and the tenuous financial position of the Postal Service. Love says, “I don’t have answers to any of that.” More important to her is that this floral arrangement be a love letter to the community that proves, even during a pandemic, flow...

Sep 7, 2020

'Victoria Longwood' water lilies at Hudson Gardens in Littleton are a pretty big deal - parkerchronicle.net

Britain's Crystal Palace. In 1851, specimens were also introduced in the U.S. In 1960, Longwood Gardens, near Philadelphia, introduced the “Victoria Longwood,” which is the variety found at Hudson Gardens. These remarkable plants, with the second largest leaf of any plant in the world, were introduced in the Littleton gardens in 1997 and have been growing well since. This summer, plant lovers can register to be notified when a Victoria water lily is about to open in the evening. Members of the active Colorado Water Garden Society maintain the Water Garden ponds and members meet with viewers to experience the opening of this spectacular bloom. The Victoria water lily is hermaphroditic: It changes from female to male overnight as it blooms. Leaf pads can expand more than 20 inches in a day, growing to as much as 8 feet in diameter, with each leaf lasting about a week. For most of the year, the Victoria water lily is distinguished only by these large lily pads, but in late July and early August, night-blooming flowers appear and last only 48 hours. Each plant produces about 10 to 12 flowers a season, according to the publication available at Hudson Gardens. The day before the plant flowers, a tennis ball-sized bud rises from the water and will open to reveal as many as 50 petals. Its fragrance resembles tuberose, pineapple and banana. In its native setting, the bloom reopens a second night, admitting pollinating scarab beetles, which don't live here — only in South America. The flower closes on the beetles, changes from female to male and opens to release the insects that have fertilized the plants. Hudson Gardens' information also says that the Victoria water lily is over 160 million years old — it appeared when South America was still connected to Africa and Antarctica. There are two species: Victoria Amazonica and Victoria Cruziana. Natives of South America make flour from the seeds of the Victoria wat...

May 1, 2020

Planning your 2020 Mother's Day celebration, gift ideas, virtual dining - 6abc Philadelphia - WPVI-TV

Be Well'Staying at home presents a litany of challenges to our health and fitness.A South Philadelphia mom is tackling the needs of new moms, people with health conditions and others who just want to be their best selves with a virtual program designed for real people living real lives.Beth Auguste, owner of Be Well With Beth, left her job after having her daughter, Camille, two years ago. She started Be Well With Beth after identifying a lack of useful nutritional resources for new moms and those with busy schedules. That endeavor expanded to Mommy and Me fitness classes and other workouts. When COVID-19 hit, she was forced to pivot to a fully virtual program.Beth offers free recipes, workouts and other services via her Instagram page. Beth has created a completely virtual program to help busy parents with food and fitness. Enrollment is open now, click here to join: The 4 Month RefreshBe Well With Beth Facebook InstagramBOK Building1901 South 9th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19148267-281-3363Dining Out for Life Goes VirtualDining Out for Life is celebrating its 30th anniversary.The annual event raises money and awareness for community-based organizations serving people living with or impacted by HIV.The event normally takes place at restaurants throughout Philadelphia, but because of the current COVID 19 pandemic, organizers are asking people to order takeout, cook at home or find another creative way to show their support for the cause.You can share your photos on social media using the hashtags #DineInEndHIVPHL and #DineOnlineEndHIV. Head to Dining Out for Life website to learn more about how you can support the organization.Apricot Stone recreates its dining experience onlineDining out is one of the biggest casualties of the virtual world we now all live in. The team behind a Northern Liberties restauran...

Mar 19, 2020

Philadelphia florists give away 2,000 flowers from events canceled due to coronavirus - The Philadelphia Inquirer

But these blossoms had life and could still bring joy, so florists Katie Robinson and Kerry Fabrizio decided to share them with the people of Philadelphia. “We just want to make people smile,” said Robinson. But they did so much more. #right-rail .newsletter-card,.newsletter-card.hidden-desktop{display:none} The Inquirer Coronavirus Newsletter Science-based coverage sent daily to your inbox — all facts, no panic As unsuspecting pedestrians — many of whom were out combating cabin fever — turned the corner and saw thousands of roses, daises, tulips, and lilies strewn across the ground at the 19th Street entrance to the park, they were overcome with emotion. For a brief moment, it was like being in The Wizard of Oz when everything changes from black-and-white to color. “These are gorgeous flowers! Holy smokes almighty. Thank God for flowers!” said one passerby who bore a striking resemblance to Santa Claus. Like many small business owners, Robinson, 39, owner of DFW Event Design in Bensalem, and Fabrizio, 34, owner of Fabufloras in Center City, have been hit hard by the cancellations and closures. But instead of letting it keep them down, they wanted to bring others up. So they reached out to their wholesalers to ask if they’d be willing to donate the unused flowers. The women also contacted six decorators to help them create stunning arrangements for the park on site. The first truck of flowers arrived shortly after 11 a.m., with the next one close behind. Bouquets of free flowers for passersby were placed in buckets just outside of the square, while Fabrizio and Robinson laid out a tarp inside the par...

Mar 19, 2020

Jean Griffis | Obituary - Meridian Star

Robert Barham Family Funeral Home is honored to be entrusted with the arrangements. Mrs. Griffis, 93, of Marion, formerly of Chunky and Philadelphia, passed away Tuesday, March 17, 2020, at her home Mrs. Jean was a retired owner and automotive dealer of Griffis Motors in Philadelphia, Miss. She was a member of Highland Baptist Church. Jean started working for the Ford dealership in Meridian, Miss. in 1949, where she worked for five dealers. After working in Meridian for 30 years Ford Motor Company approached her to partner with the local dealer in Philadelphia. During her working career, she earned the knowledge she needed and the respect of Ford Motor Company. In 1981 she was awarded a Franchise and the Dealership became Griffis Ford Mercury. Jean was the first woman in the Southeastern Region to be awarded a franchise that was not owned by a husband or father, a fact that Jean was very proud of. In 1986, a new building was built and the dealership became Griffis Motors which carry products of Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep and Ram and employs twenty-six people. Because of her love for her employees and the importance of education, a scholarship had ben established for the children of employees who plan to attend college. So far, over a dozen scholarships have been awarded. Mrs. Jean is survived by her children, Bill Griffis, Dana Carson and Carol Brown (Huff); grandchildren, Tracy Barber, Laura Baucum (Jackie), Cade Carson, Jennifer Settlemires (Steve), Wright Griffis (Leslie) and Addison Griffis (Jamie); eleven great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild. Mrs. Griffis is preceded in death by her husband W.H. "Pat" Griffis of Chunky, Miss. The Griffis family suggest that memorials be made as donations to Highland Baptist Church Youth Fund in Meridian, Miss. or to Trinity Baptist Church Youth Fund in Philadelphia, Miss. in lieu of flowers.

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