Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Aston, PA

Find local Aston, Pennsylvania florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Aston and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Aston Flower Shops

Aston Florist

3 East Dutton Mill Rd
Aston, PA 19014
(610) 497-1433

Aston PA News

Feb 1, 2020

Growth in Gardening: The healing power of nature - San Marcos Daily Record

The array of different tastes achieved from a wide variety of plants is overwhelming — bitter, acidic, sweet, and so on; almost all offer an astonishing array of health benefits too. Sight is one of the defining elements of plants due to the fact that they can help alter our moods. Looking at and being surrounded by nature can be hugely calming and restorative for the mind. One oft repeated study by the National Center for Biotechnology Information has shown that surgery patients recover faster, have fewer complications, require less pain medication, and return home sooner, when they are able to look out a window onto a scene of nature’s beauty rather than a wall, cityscape or such as they heal. Hearing is through the wind or mechanical movement of flower heads, seed pods or leaves. We can find solitude and comfort in these sounds; they are calming and tranquil. One of the most recommended ways for busy people to de-stress is to take time out to listen to music. I would argue that there is no music in the world as sweet and pleasing as that of nature itself. “I work like a gardener,” the great painter Joan Miró wrote in his meditation on the proper pace for creative work. Indeed, to garden and even merely to be in a garden, is nothing less than a triumph of resistance against the merciless race of modern life, so compulsively focused on productivity at the cost of creativity, of lucidity, of sanity; a reminder that we are creatures enmeshed with the great web of being, in which, as the naturalist John Muir observed long ago, “when we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe;” a return to what is noblest, which means most natural, in us. There is something deeply humanizing in listening to the rustle of a newly leaved tree, in watching a bumblebee romance a blossom, in kneeling onto the carpet of soil to make a hole for a tomato transplant, gently moving a startled earthworm or two out of the way. Walt Whitman knew this when he weighed what makes life worth living as he convalesced from a paralytic stroke: “After you have exhausted what there is in business, politics, conviviality, love, and so on — I have found that none of these finally satisfy, or permanently wear — what remains? Nature remains; to bring out from their torpid recesses, the affinities of a man or woman with the open air, the trees, fields, the changes of seasons — the sun by day and the stars of heaven by night.” Simply put, the human spirit longs to be a part of nature and not apart from nature. I would highly encourage you to get out into your garden or visit the many wonderful gardens that can be found nearby, such as the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center or Austin’s Zilker Park, or the San Antonio Botanical Gardens. All amazing day trip locations. I promise that you won’t feel worse for the visit. -- Joe Urbach is the publisher of GardeningAustin.com and the Phytonutrient Blog. He has lived in the Central Texas area for over 30 years.

Dec 18, 2019

How flowers adapt to their pollinators: Modularity facilitates rapid adaptation of single floral organs to different pollinators - Science Daily

Flowering plants are characterized by an astonishing diversity of flowers of different shapes and sizes. This diversity has arisen in adaptation to selection imposed by different pollinators including among others bees, flies, butterflies, hummingbirds, bats or rodents. Although several studies have documented that pollinators can impose strong selection pressures on flowers, our understanding of how flowers diversify remains fragmentary. For example, does the entire flower adapt to a pollinator, or do only some flower parts evolve to fit a pollinator while other flower parts may remain unchanged? advertisement In a recent study, scientists around Agnes Dellinger from the Department of Botany and Biodiversity Research from the University of Vienna investigated flowers of 30 species of a tropical plant group (Merianieae) from the Andes. "Each of these plant species has adapted to pollination by either bees, birds, bats or rodents," says Dellinger. Us...

Dec 18, 2019

Biologists Discover That Flower Shapes Evolve to Adapt to Their Pollinators - SciTechDaily

Flower of a passerine-pollinated species of the genus Axinaea. Credit: Agnes Dellinger Flowering plants are characterized by an astonishing diversity of flowers of different shapes and sizes. This diversity has arisen in adaptation to selection imposed by different pollinators including among others bees, flies, butterflies, hummingbirds, bats or rodents. Although several studies have documented that pollinators can impose strong selection pressures on flowers, our understanding of how flowers diversify remains fragmentary. For example, does the entire flower adapt to a pollinator, or do only some flower parts evolve to fit a pollinator while other flower parts may remain unchanged? Flower of the hummingbird- and bat-pollinated species Meriania radula from the Ecuadorian páramo. Credit: Agnes Dellinger In a recent study, scientists around Agnes Dellinger from the Department of Botany and Biodiversity Research from the University of Vienna investigated flowers of 30 species of a tropical plant group (Merianieae) from the Andes. “Each of these plant species has adapted to pollination by either bees, birds, bats or rodents,” says Dellinger. Using High-Resolution X-ray computed tomography, the research team produced 3D-models of these flowers and used geometric-morphometric methods to analyze differences in flower shape among species with different pollinators. 3D-model of a flower of the passerine-pollinated species Axinaea costaricensis from the Costa Rican montane rain forests. Credit: Agnes Dellinger The researchers could show that flower shapes have evolved in adaptation to the distinct pollinators, but that flower shape evolution was not homogeneous across the flower. In particular, the showy sterile organs of flowers (petals) adapted to the different pollinators more ...

Nov 9, 2019

Obituary: Denise Anne Gats - Lewiston Sun Journal

Androscoggin Hospice House in Auburn, Maine. She was born May 14, 1936, in Jay, Maine, the daughter of Alfred Ouellette and Annie (Castonguay) Ouellette. She graduated from Jay High in 1954. She attended beautician school in Old Orchard Beach where she met her husband Joseph Gats. They married November 21, 1959, at St. Rose of Lima Church in Jay. Denise enjoyed cooking, bowling and practicing her faith, including her many years as a communicant of St. Rose of Lima Church and member of the Daughters of Isabella. However, her greatest love was family. She was a devoted wife, loving mother and adored Mimi to her grandchildren. She was happiest around the holidays surrounded by her children and grandchildren. She is survived by her three children, Carol Truchon, and husband Mike of Turner, William Gats and wife Kelli of Livermore, and Lisa Roney and husband Christopher of Freeport, as well as seven grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. She is also survived by her siblings Claire Fitzpatric, William Ouellette and Elmore Ouellette. She was predeceased by her husband of 54 years, Joseph Gats, and her siblings Jeannine Ouellette, Doris Simoneau, Roland Ouellette, and Paul Ouellette. Denise’s Family would like to thank the staff at Montello Commons ...

Jul 5, 2019

Bucks Beautiful is set to host the 25th annual Kitchen and Garden Tour in Doylestown - The Intelligencer

Blue Violet Flowers & Gifts, 1345 Easton Road, Warrington; Bucks Country Gardens, 1057 N. Easton Road, Doylestown and The Doylestown Bookshop, 16 S. Main Street, Doylestown. ...

Apr 27, 2019

Artist crafts flowers from paper for Kingwood Gardens exhibit - Mansfield News Journal

I made this bouquet. It took me like 45 hours," she said. "But I loved it." So she kept trying, saying she was astonished with what she created. And then a friend of that person wanted one for her mom, too. She then realized she had a business. "I didn't want to do origami anymore. I wanted something that was challenging and fun and that was never going to end as far as design aspects. It was sort of like origami on steroids," she said with a laugh. "It was like sculpture and still to this day it challenges me every single day." She said there are a lot of challenges to running a business for any artist and month after month there are tears and meltdowns, but she keeps going because she loves it. She has a lot of patience and has a lot of fun, she said. Gray chooses branches and river rocks to incorporate into her work. "Those are the only two things I incorporate into my work and the reason I use those things is it builds upon the illusion. For me, running a business, I don't want to spend a lot of time recreating a branch," she said. For example, a yellow, flowering forsythia branch in the exhibit makes people look twice. "A lot of people came into the gallery thinking I had just bought something as like a display for myself and then when I told them, they got up close. So it's kind of fun to play a trick; using the resin made it look like it was in...