Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Pennsylvania, PA Florists

Find florist in Pennsylvania state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a Pennsylvania city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

Pennsylvania Cities

Pennsylvania State Featured Florists

House Of Flower

611 Main Street
Forest City, PA 18421

Lillies In The Valley Flower & Tuxedo Shop

238 W Mill St
St Marys, PA 15857

Flowers 'n Bows

625 Wood Street
Clarion, PA 16214

Jazmyn Floral

516 North Main Street
Plains, PA 18705

Petals & Greens

230 Pine St
Tamaqua, PA 18252

Pennsylvania Flowers News

Apr 4, 2021

The Perseverance of New York City’s Wildflowers - The New York Times

Lenape people from their ancestral land of Lenapehoking, which encompasses New Jersey, Delaware and parts of Connecticut, Pennsylvania and New York State. The Lenape knew spring by another bloom: white tufts of flowers from the serviceberry tree, which powder its branches like snow in April. Today, serviceberries still bloom in Brooklyn, in both Prospect Park and John Paul Jones Park.A wildflower can refer to any flowering plant that was not cultivated, intentionally planted or given human aid, yet it still managed to grow and bloom. This is one of several definitions offered by the plant ecologist Donald J. Leopold in Andrew Garn’s new photo book “Wildflowers of New York City,” and one that feels particularly suited to the city and its many transplants.Scarlet bee balm.Yellow wood sorrel growing by the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge and Battery Weed fort, in Staten Island, N.Y.Hedge bindweed and rose of Sharon by the ConEd plant on Avenue D, in Manhattan.Butterfly weed.Mr. Garn did not intend for “Wildflowers of New York City” to be a traditional field guide for identifying flowers. Rather, his reverent portraits invite us to delight in the beauty of flowers that we more often encounter in a sidewalk crack than in a bouquet. “They all share a beauty of form and function that offers testimony to the glory of survival in the big city,” Mr. Garn writes. He asks us to stop and consider the sprouts we might pass every day and appreciate them not just for their beauty, but also for their ability to thrive.More than 2,000 species of plants are found in New York City, more than half of which are naturalized, Mr. Garn writes. Some were imported for their beauty; ornate shrubs such as the buttercup winterhazel, star magnolia and peegee hydrangea all reached North America for the first time in a single shipment to the Parsons & Sons Nursery in Flushing in 1862.Others came as stowaways, as the writer Allison C. Meier notes in the book’s introduction. In the 19th century, the botanist Addison Brown scoured the heaps of discarded ballast — earth and stones that weighed down ships — by city docks for unfamiliar blossoms, as he noted in an 1880 issue of the Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club. During one July jaunt to Gowanus in Brooklyn, Mr. Brown noted purple sprouts of sticky nightshade...

Dec 10, 2020

Karen Hannis Meinhart Obituary - Mt. Holly Springs, PA | Cumberlink Sentinel - Legacy.com

December 2020 with her family by her side after a courageous battle against pancreatic cancer. Karen was born on 25 September 1953 in Allentown, Pennsylvania to the late Bridget and Rollin Hannis. Karen graduated from Central Catholic High School in Allentown in 1971. She met her future husband, Richard, at a dance while he was a student at a nearby university. They married in 1975, and together they traveled the world with the US Air Force, living in Arkansas, the Azores, Delaware, Texas, Germany, Rhode Island, and Virginia. They settled in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, where they built a warm and welcoming home in which to grow old together and filled it with art from their family's adventures together. Karen worked as an administrator and human resources professional with the US Government and retired from federal service in 2016. She is survived and lovingly remembered by her husband of 45 years, Richard Meinhart of Carlisle; her daughter, Lauren Meinhart of Oslo, Norway; her son, David Meinhart, of Philadelphia; and five siblings: Jeanine Johnson of Emmaus, Sheila Mangano of Clifton, Virginia, Steven Hannis of Easton, Brian Hannis of Naples, Florida, and Kelly Cuetara of Downingtown. She was preceded in death by her brother, Michael Hannis, of...

Oct 15, 2020

Florists 'bomb' Philly mailboxes for 2020 election ballots - WHYY

Her inspiration for United By Blooms came from several forces converging: the U.S. Postal service faces possible cuts (which were recently blocked), Pennsylvania is allowing anyone who wishes to vote by mail in a presidential election for the first time, and the end of the growing season puts a period on a very difficult year for the local flower industry. “Florists and designers and farmers have had a tough year. They had to completely retool their businesses. I didn’t think people would jump at this opportunity,” said Carpenter. She was surprised by how many florists signed on to United By Blooms, and how quickly. The call went out only six weeks ago. “The community of designers, florists and flower farmers is really strong,” said Carpenter. Florist Kate Carpenter launched the United by Blooms project because she wanted to do something positive for her community and encourage people to vote. She decorated a mailbox at the corner of Carpenter Lane and Greene Street in Mount Airy. (Emma Lee/WHYY) One of the participants is Jennie Love, owner of Love ‘N Fresh Flowers. She created an autumn-colored rainbow of flowers arching about six feet high and plunging toward the slot of a postal box at the corner of Germantown Avenue and Bethlehem Pike in Chestnut Hill. The arch starts at the bottom with deep copper-colored amaranth tassels, moves through a gradient of orange and dark yellow hues, and ends with a spear of bright golds and buttery yellows pointing toward the mailbox. “We have lots of dahlias. It’s prime dahlia season in October,” said Love. “They start deep and rich at the bottom of the arch, then it gets the bright happiness close to the mailbox. That’s the goal: be bright and happy at the mailbox.” Love is both a farmer and florist. She grows everything she uses on a five-acre, certified natural farm in Roxborough. The bread and butter of her business had been weddings, but that dried up this year. Last April, her prospects were dire. Over the summer she launched a flower delivery service where people can pre-order a box of flowers and have it delivered weekly to their door. Called Porch Petals, Love keeps the delivery radius tight – she only services Philadelphia’s Northwest neighborhoods near her farm. To her surprise, it worked. Porch Petals caught on and saved her business. Floral designer Diane Floss (left) and Jennie Love of Love and Fresh Flowers decorated the mailbox at Germantown Avenue and Bethlehem Pike ...

Aug 3, 2020

Marilyn Lee Ward, 97, practiced organic gardening long before it became fashionable - Williamsburg Yorktown Daily

She is survived by six grandchildren, Jim Miller of Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina, Mary Muntz of Greensburg, Kansas, Dave Ward of Warrington, Pennsylvania, Sarah Ward of Virginia Beach, Margaret Madrone of El Prado, New Mexico, and Duncan Ward of Hyattsville. She had 11 great-grandchildren. Marilyn began losing her memory during her mid 1980s, and her life became lighter as the past fogged in her mind. She forgot to miss the loved ones she had lost, forgot to be self-conscious or worry about how others perceived her, becoming childlike in many ways. Each day offered new perspectives and adventures, even as she re-visited once familiar places and ideas. Marilyn forgot she had arthritis. She forgot she was old. She forgot she had heart failure. For the first time in her life she began to truly relax, rest and play. As a U.S. Navy wife, Marilyn had moved some 23 times. But thanks to the help she received from her family, as well as from her gardening friend, Trish Hann, and the Westminster Canterbury Hospice at Home team, she was able to live out the last 50 years of her life in her home. Marilyn was buried Wednesday, July 29, in Princess Ann Memorial Park, Virginia Beach. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that donations may be made to the Nature Conservancy, the Gary Sinise Foundation or Operation Blessing. Share online condolences with the family at Altmeyer Funeral Homes & Crematory. Always be informed. Click here to get the latest news and information delivered to your inbox...

Aug 3, 2020

Downingtown’s Petals Please recycles wedding and funeral flowers into free bouquets for lonely seniors - The Philadelphia Inquirer

But a Northeastern Pennsylvania group was having great success with an approach similar to her idea. So she drove to Scranton, where the volunteers of Petals for Goodness Sake were “so generous and so helpful,” Adams said. “It was, OK, let’s do this.” She began networking from home, calling friends and neighbors. “Because I worked in hospice I knew all of the nursing homes and the assisted living places, and I knew a lot of staff there,” said Adams. “Unfortunately, I knew a lot of funeral directors.” In July 2018, a volunteer picked up the first donation and returned ”with so many flowers in her SUV you couldn’t even see her.” Petals Please has since shifted its arranging sessions from Adams’ dining-room table to a space at Downingtown United Methodist Church. Flowers and vases or other containers are donated, and everything gets recycled, including flower petals, which get taken to a chicken farm in Malvern. Amelia Wondrasch especially enjoys that task. A 15-year-old student at Episcopal Academy in Newtown Square whose family is close to the Adamses, she has been a volunteer pretty much from the beginning. “I’ve always been a big one for recycling and composting,” she said. “And I love the idea of being able to...