Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections.

Valentine's Flowers

Show her that you want to celebrate your love in the most prefect way, send flowers today!

Valentine's Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Florists in Alexandria, ON

Find local Alexandria, Ontario florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Alexandria and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Alexandria Flower Shops

Fleuriste Alexandria Florist

13 Main St N
Alexandria, ON K0C1A0
(613) 525-3852

Fleuriste L'occasion

84 Anik St
Alexandria, ON K0C1A0
(613) 525-1043

Alexandria ON News

Apr 4, 2021

The Best Florists in New York - Curbed

Zealand, and cherry-red tulips shipped directly from Holland. Set designer Julia Wagner worked with DFL exclusively to create the floral backdrop for Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s December Vanity Fair cover. “Dutch Flower Line is my most trusted vendor,” Wagner says. “I?have a guy there, Chris DeMeo, who I text whenever I need something truly special. He sourced these amazing wild roses for her shoot and cut all of them from the bush the day before we photographed her.” New York design editor Wendy Goodman likes to “go in there and just inhale,” she says. “They have just such a massive amount of fresh flowers it feels like a garden. I revere every one of the holdouts on 28th Street.” For Spotting Anna Wintour’s Interns Miho Kosuda, LTD., 310 E. 44th St.; 212-922-9122 “I used to go to Miho’s in Anna’s Town Car every week to pick up arrangements she had ordered,” a former intern recalls. “The shop is on a tiny side street by the U.N. — you’d miss it if you were speed-walking — and the flowers are absolutely insane.” The shop — founded by floral designer Miho Kosuda and her daughter Carol — is also a longtime favorite of Carolina Herrera. It’s not surprising that Miho’s arrangements (from $150) tend to be on the extravagant side, like hundred-flower bouquets featuring one color scheme and one bloom, such as roses, tulips, or anemones. (She once created an arrangement for designer Bill Blass consisting of 660 mango-colored calla lilies.) For Bodega Roses That Will Last Two Weeks 57 Market, 363 W. 57th St., No. 1; 212-586-3066 source media="(min...

Feb 1, 2020

Local flower shop continues to bloom | News - Fauquier Times

New owner, same name.Designs by Teresa, the florist shop that’s been a fixture at the corner of Main Street and Alexandria Pike in Old Town Warrenton for years, will continue its place as a Warrenton fixture. Virginia Gerrish and her husband David purchased Designs by Teresa because they didn’t want Warrenton to lose another long-standing business. TIMES STAFF PHOTOS/JAMES IVANCIC David and Virginia Gerrish purchased the florist business on Oct. 31 and decided to keep the business’s well-known name. Former owne...

Jan 4, 2020

There's a novel way to say it with flowers - Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

A get-well bouquet could channel a favorite place, pastime or dream. 'A DIRECT REFLECTION' Ashley Greer, owner of Atelier Ashley Flowers in Alexandria, Va., said clients tend to get stressed about their flower choices. "Some people are very self-conscious when it comes to flowers and their impressions," Greer says. "People think that the flowers they use at an event or that they send are a direct reflection on them. And they want to be careful that their arrangement reflects their taste, their style and the occasion." Condolence flowers may be what people most obsess about. "When you are sending something for a funeral you want to be sensitive," Greer says. "Sometimes people say they don't want to send anything that looks fun. They prefer something white and green." Dowling, whose studio is in Alexandria, says condolence flowers "don't have to be all white. Having flowers that are soft and comforting and focus on texture is a good way to go. Make them personal, and possibly reflecting a certain flower the person loved. Then they can really evoke the sense of a warm hug." New York flower designer and illustrator Cathy Graham says her go-to sympathy flowers include a paperwhite plant and a white or blue hydrangea plant that could bloom for a few weeks. "You don't have to do all white, but I would not use bright, festive colors." Don't overlook household pets when you are creating a bouquet or arrangement to send to someone, Graham says. "Lilies and other flowers are bad for cats," says Graham, who worries about that with her own two ginger cats, Reggie and Cheddar. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals publishes a list of plants that are poisonous to pets. The main thing with flowers is don't overthink them. "People are so touched by your making the effort to send flowers that pretty much whatever you send will be appreciated," Graham says. CHECK ON PRACTICES, CUSTOMS Anne Chertoff, chief operating officer of Beaumont Etiquette, a New York consulting firm, says it's always a good idea to check on religious practices and customs. "People like to know the rules," she says. "They can think about the message they want to get across. Then it's up to them if and when they want to use the rules or break with them." For instance, flowers for a funeral often center on lilies. But she says instead of flowers, it's customary for Jews to send or take food to the homes of the family who aren't supposed to cook during the shiva, which lasts seven days, and also to feed people who come to pay respects to the family. "I'm Jewish, so I would send an edible arrangement," she says. Amy Merrick, a flower designer who ran her own studio in Brooklyn and now focuses on events and teaching, says she has found that many customers don't have a very good knowledge of the varieties of flowers and place more importance on the style or mood of their arrangements. "The average person does have an interest in what flowers represent, but not in the historical context," she says. People are sending their own messages, choosing them based on the personality of the recipient and the personality of the flowers. "I think buying a bunch of daisies signifies this is a sweet, free-spirited personality, whereas an orchid has a more elegant feel to it," Merrick says. In her n...

Jan 4, 2020

Flowers are a great last-minute gift — but be sure to send the right message - Seattle Times

On Flowers: Lessons From an Accidental Florist.” (Tif Hunter) Ashley Greer, owner of Atelier Ashley Flowers in Alexandria, Virginia, said clients tend to get stressed about their flower choices. “Some people are very self-conscious when it comes to flowers and their impressions,” Greer says. “People think that the flowers they use at an event or that they send are a direct reflection on them. And they want to be careful that their arrangement reflects their taste, their style and the occasion.” Advertising Condolence flowers may be what people most obsess about. “When you are sending something for a funeral you want to be sensitive,” Greer says. “Sometimes people say they don’t want to send anything that looks fun. They prefer something white and green.” Dowling, whose studio is in Alexandria, says condolence flowers “don’t have to be all white. Having flowers that are soft and comforting and focus on texture is a good way to go. Make them personal, and possibly reflecting a certain flower the person loved. Then they can really evoke the sense of a warm hug.” New York flower designer and illustrator Cathy Graham says her go-to sympathy flowers include a paperwhite plant and a white or blue hydrangea plant that could bloom for a few weeks. “You don’t have to do all white, but I would not use bright, festive colors.” Don’t overlook household pets when you are creating a bouquet or arrangement to send to someone, says Graham. “Lilies and other flowers are bad for cats,” says Graham, who worries about that with her own two ginger cats, Reggie and Cheddar. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals publishes a list of plants that are poisonous to pets. img data-ratio="1.50037" data-caption="Included in this Atelier Ashley Flowers design for a baby shower are ranunculus, which mean radiant charm. It never hurts to let a woman who is about to give birth know that she is radiant, owner Ashley Greer says. (SKC Photography)" class alt="Included in this Atelier Ashley Flowers design for a baby shower are ranunculus, which mean radiant charm. It never hurts to let a woman who is about to give birth know that she is radiant, owner Ashley Greer says. (SKC Photography)" src="https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/design-flowers-ba15b5bc-00a9-11ea-8501-2a7123a38c58-780x520.jpg" srcset="https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/design-flowers-ba15b5bc-00a9-11ea-8501-2a7123a38c58-300x200.jpg 300w, https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/design-flowers-ba15b5bc-00a9-11ea-8501-2a7123a38c58-768x512.jpg 768w, https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/design-flowers-ba15b5bc-00a9-11ea-8501-2a7123a38c58-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/design-flowers-ba15b5bc-00a9-11ea-8501-2a7123a38c58-780x520.jpg 780w, https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/design-flowers-ba15b5bc-00a9-11ea-8501-2a7123a38c58-1020x680.jpg 1020w, https://static.seattletimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/design-flowers-ba15b5bc-00a9-11ea-8501-2a7123a38c58-1560x1040.jpg...

Nov 9, 2019

Flower etiquette has changed dramatically over time. But the type you give still sends a message. - The Washington Post

Obama party planner Bryan Rafanelli shares his secrets for a memorable bash] Ashley Greer, owner of Atelier Ashley Flowers in Alexandria, Va., said clients tend to get stressed out about their flower choices. “Some people are very self-conscious when it comes to flowers and their impressions,” Greer says. “People think that the flowers they use at an event or that they send are a direct reflection on them. And they want to be careful that their arrangement reflects their taste, their style and the occasion.” Condolence flowers may be what people most obsess about. “When you are sending something for a funeral you want to be sensitive,” Greer says. “Sometimes people say they don’t want to send anything that looks fun. They prefer something white and green.”Dowling, whose studio is in Alexandria, says condolence flowers “don’t have to be all white. Having flowers that are soft and comforting and focus on texture is a good way to go. Make them personal, and possibly reflecting a certain flower the person loved. Then they can really evoke the sense of a warm hug.”New York flower designer and illustrator Cathy Graham says her go-to sympathy flowers include a paperwhite plant and a white or blue hydrangea plant that could bloom for a few weeks. “You don’t have to do all white, but I would not use bright, festive colors.”Don’t overlook household pets when you are creating a bouquet or arrangement to send to someone, says Graham. “Lilies and other flowers are bad for cats,” says Graham, who worries about that with her own two ginger cats Reggie and Cheddar. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals publishes a list of plants that are poisonous to pets. The main thing with flowers is don’t overthink them. “People are so touched by your making the effort to send flowers that pretty much whatever you send will be appreciated,” Graham says. SKC Photography Included in this Atelier Ashley Flowers design for a baby shower are ranunculus, which means radiant charm. It never hurts to let a woman who is about to give birth know that she is radiant, owner Ashley Greer says. Anne Chertoff, chief operating officer of Beaumont Etiquette, a New York consulting firm, says it’s always a good idea to check on religious practices and customs. “People like to know the rules,” she says. “They can think about the message they want to get across. Then it’s up to them if and when they want to use the rules or break with them.” For instance, flowers for a funeral often center on lilies. But she says instead of flowers, it’s customary for Jews to send or bring food to the homes of the family who aren’t supposed to cook during the shiva, which lasts seven days, and also to feed people who come to pay respects to the family. “I’m Jewish, so I would send an edible arrangement,” she says. Amy Merrick, a flower designer who ran her own studio in Brooklyn and now focuses on events and teaching, says she’s found that many customers don’t have a very good knowledge of the varieties of flowers and place more importance on the style or mood of their arrangements. “The average person does have an interest in what flowers represent, but not in the historical context,” she says. People are sending their own messages, choosing them based on the personality of the recipient and the personality of the flowers. “I think buying a bunch of daisies signifies this is a sweet, free-spirited personality, whereas an orchid has a more elegant feel to it,” Merrick says.Tif Hunter Daisies are good to send to someone who has a casual, free-spirited style, says Amy Merrick in her new book “On Flowers,” just published by Artisan Books. In her new book “On Flowers: Lessons from an Accidental ...

Aug 22, 2019

F.C. Florist Sends Bouquets to Congresswomen Targeted by Trump - Falls Church News Press

In response to in-fighting between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Ca.) and four freshmen Democratic congresswomen — Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.), Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) and Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.) — Trump chose to chime in with a tweet, asking “Why don’t they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came?” That line in particular struck a racial connotation with Americans who watched the verbal barbs being traded, especially ones who are a part of the country’s immigrant community. Advertisements Rabinovich decided to lend some scented support to the congresswomen after seeing customers send floral arrangements to Pelosi as well as, as she put it, “an assistant for a well-known female singer” deliver some to Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. So the Russian refugee who immigrated to the U.S. when she was six years old sent custom arrangements to each of the congresswomens’ offices in D.C. as an act purely motivated by human decency. “If somebody wants to withhold their support of a small business because they think it’s a political move then that’s ridiculous,” Rabinovich said, who mentioned that she hasn’t received a response from any of the congresswomen as of yet. “I don’t think anyone would fault me for doing something nice for someone. Just because I sent flowers to people in the Democratic party doesn’t mean I did anything negative to anyone in the Republican party.” Rabinovich’s gesture landed her press coverage in other outlets, including American University’s WAMU, an interview on the Thom Hartmann Show a...