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Phone-A-Gift Florist

Order flowers and gifts from Phone-A-Gift Florist located in Mansfield OH for a birthday, anniversary, graduation or a funeral service. The address of the flower shop is 894 Ashland Rd, Mansfield Ohio 44905 Zip. The phone number is (419) 589-4250. We are committed to offer the most accurate information about Phone-A-Gift Florist in Mansfield OH. Please contact us if this listing needs to be updated. Phone-A-Gift Florist delivers fresh flowers – order today.

Business name:
Phone-A-Gift Florist
Address:
894 Ashland Rd
City:
Mansfield
State:
Ohio
Zip Code:
44905
Phone number:
(419) 589-4250
if this is your business: ( update info) (delete this listing)
Express you love, friendship, thanks, support - or all of the above - with beautiful flowers & gifts!

Find Phone-A-Gift Florist directions to 894 Ashland Rd in Mansfield, OH (Zip 44905) on the Map. It's latitude and longitude coordinates are 40.772739, -82.481918 respectively.

Florists in Mansfield OH and Nearby Cities

41 S. Mulberry
Mansfield, OH 44902
(0.22 Miles from Phone-A-Gift Florist)
1235 Park Ave. W
Mansfield, OH 44906
(2.12 Miles from Phone-A-Gift Florist)
935 S. Home Rd
Mansfield, OH 44906
(3.23 Miles from Phone-A-Gift Florist)
4153 Park Ave W
Mansfield, OH 44999
(7.57 Miles from Phone-A-Gift Florist)
72 Main St
Bellville, OH 44813
(9.55 Miles from Phone-A-Gift Florist)

Flowers and Gifts News

Aug 3, 2020

Mansfield woman enjoys cactus blooms, if only for one night a year - Mansfield News Journal

Mark Caudill Mansfield News JournalPublished 10:43 AM EDT Jul 25, 2020MANSFIELD - For most of the year, the night-blooming cereus stands in a corner of Judy Theisen's sun room.The towering plant, which is more than six feet tall, attracts serious attention in late June and July when it starts to bloom.A type of cactus, the plant is special.Night-blooming cereus is the common name referring to a large number of flowering ceroid cacti that bloom at night. The flowers are short-lived, and some of these species, such as Selenicereus grandiflorus, bloom only once a year, for a single night.Other names for one or more cacti with this habit are princess of the night, Honolulu queen, Christ in the manger and queen of the night.This has been a banner year for Theisen's night-blooming cereus. "I have had blooms before, maybe two, three, four or five," she said. "For it to have 24, it's unusual to see."The delicate white flowers can be eight inches across. Theisen saw seven blooms of Tuesday night.On Wednesda...

May 1, 2020

Where to see bluebonnets and wildflowers in Dallas-Fort Worth while social distancing - culturemap.com

Indian paintbrush, Indian blanket, Evening primrose, Mexican Hat, and Coreopsis blooming now. Photo-worthy patches have sprung up along roads in Mansfield, Azle, and areas around Ennis — even if the official trails are closed. According to posts in the Facebook group Texas Bluebonnets and Wildflowers, Indian Paintbrush (which can be various shades of red, white, orange, yellow, and purple) are abundant in far west Fort Worth, off Interstates 30 and 20, toward Weatherford. Each year, bluebonnets paint the landscape along highways 183, 121, and 114 near DFW Airport. And they dot stretches of I-30 within the Fort Worth and Arlington city limits, too. For those willing to drive a bit out of town, pretty patches and gorgeous fields have been spotted in Plano. One is near the J.C. Penney headquarters on Legacy Drive. Another is along the Bluebonnet Trail Greenbelt, just east of where the trail crosses Custer Road. Frisco's got some pretty ones just outside Zion Cemetery. For those making it a day-long adventure, farther out of the Metroplex, there are patches at the entrance to Mallard Park in Lavon (about 30 miles north of McKinney) and fields of wildflowers off Highway 75 in Denison and Sherman, spotters say. Practical considerationsBefore you head out on a country drive, remember we are living in a world without pit stops at roadside Whataburgers. Plan snacks, drinks, and potential restroom situations accordingly. Also, remember the "groups" rule. If you approach a pretty patch and another family is taking photos, ride on by. Some regular guidelines to keep in mind, too: Don't trespass on private property. Don't pick the flowers. Step gently so you don't squish them, and don't leave anything behind. Also, beware of snakes, fire ants, and other critters that might be hiding among the flowers. Wildflowers from the comfort of your couchCan’t get outside? Enjoy a virtual tour of what’s blooming around the state on the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Flickr page, populated with wildflower sightings from state parks and wildlife management areas, or its Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter accounts, where anyone can share photos of the great outdoors. Proska says the INaturalist app will allow you to see what’s in bloom in different regions around the Metroplex. The Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin also posts sightings on a curated Instagram account, @texaswildflowerwatch (#txwildflowers2020) and has a narrated virtual tour of the Center. --- Melissa Gaskill contributed to this report.

Sep 19, 2019

In The Garden | Tiger swallowtail butterflies abundant this summer - Mansfield News Journal

Richard Poffenbaugh is a retired biology teacher and active home gardener since 1960. He is a member of the Mansfield Men's Garden Club and was editor of the club newsletter (The Greenhorn) for 21 years. He resides in Ontario with his wife, Barbara. Reach him at 419-529-2966.

Aug 22, 2019

Cig Harvey engages the senses with 'Eating Flowers' - Press Herald

Courtesy of the artist OGUNQUIT — There’s something of a lovefest blooming at the Ogunquit Museum of American Art. Museum director Michael Mansfield calls photographer Cig Harvey “kind of a hero” and praises the artist for working with “contagious enthusiasm” and creating “inspiring” art. Harvey calls the exhibition in Ogunquit something “I’ve always wanted and couldn’t articulate. I am lit up smiling. I’ve been lucky to have many shows in the last 20 years, but none like this.” The exhibition, “Eating Flowers: Sensations of Cig Harvey,” is a mid-career survey of 70 photographs, video, neon and written word pieces. Collectively, the work addresses Harvey’s interest in exploring the sensations of touch, taste, sound, smell and memory. Her photos are full of mystery and sometimes feel like the tangible expression of a dream. “Birds of New England, Rockport, Maine” by Cig Harvey. The exhibition is an explosion of color and emotions that spark a riot of sensations. Harvey’s large-scale photographs capture individual moments of intrigue – a woman walking on the beach in the fog, apples frozen on a branch, a self-portrait of the artist poised on the side of channel marker, hove...

Apr 27, 2019

Artist crafts flowers from paper for Kingwood Gardens exhibit - Mansfield News Journal

Lou Whitmire Mansfield News Journal Published 8:19 AM EDT Apr 20, 2019 MANSFIELD - "Paper Gardens," an art exhibit at Kingwood Center Gardens by Columbus artist Lea Gray, will have some visitors wondering if the flowers are real or fake. Gray said she takes that as a compliment. The exhibit, open thr...

Jan 25, 2019

Over the Garden Fence: Garden Club assists in decorating Kingwood for holidays - Bucyrus Telegraph Forum

Earth, Wind and Flowers Garden Club members prepared for the King home, also known as the mansion, at Kingwood Center Gardens in Mansfield. The overall theme of "Light Up the Night" had been selected a year ago. There is a reason organizers try to stay ahead of the holiday game. The whole effort has been going on for years because Mr. King loved Christmas. And now, the many garden clubs and volunteers have their favorite rooms and areas to decorate. A few decorating teams want their favorite room. The theme for the next year is thrown out early and grabbing begins. While they are decorating this year, some of the groups are talking about the following year. The first come, first served notion directs this planning. In two time periods we made ornaments, and then did the actual decorating. For lighting up the night, my thought was to use totally white, shimmery things. Sparkling surfaces of snowy ornaments and glass and reflective items could bring a glow to nighttime. When our team came together, the bin holding many white ornaments brought sparkling deer and butterfly ornaments. A trip to a re-store netted several white and silver bulbs, and a wreath of long clustered strands of icy white. This was pulled apart by Cheryl Corney making many clusters that would be tucked into the boughs. Susan Kalb sat and painted glue, white snow, and set sequins into a couple dozen used ornaments, bringing new life to each one. We took netted glistening white bows off the wreaths from the Bucyrus Historical Society display from last year and retied them into smaller bows for the tree. When it came time to start the decorating, June Gebhardt and I made the trip over to the assembly room with our white heap of ornaments. The fraser fir stood 7-feet-tall. Other groups had already started the decorating, but only one was done. Beside us a team of Kingwood volunteers was busy making that end of the room resemble a living room complete with a Santa relaxing in a chair. They had made several trips to the Ki...

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