Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Baltimore, OH

Find local Baltimore, Ohio florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Baltimore and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Baltimore Flower Shops

Beautiful Floral Creations

110 N. Main St
Baltimore, OH 43105
(740) 862-3022

Baltimore OH News

Oct 15, 2020

How These Surprise Quarantine 'Flower Bombs' Are Helping Families in Need - Baltimore Magazine

And all of their proceeds are donated to the Ronald McDonald House in Baltimore, which provides a home away from home to families with seriously ill or injured children. Kim Meagher, a longtime Ronald McDonald House volunteer, got the idea for the Quarantine Flower Bombing Project after the COVID-19 pandemic shut down the state. “I teach a women’s art class at my church, and a lot of young moms attend,” Meagher says. “When quarantine hit and school was canceled, everyone was kind of in a panic, so I started posting online crafts to do with your kids daily. I came across the paper plate flowers and thought it would be an awesome thing to do as a ding dong ditch-type of activity—where you decorate someone’s yard, but they don’t know it’s you.” The government shutdowns also prevented volunteers from being at the Ronald McDonald House in Jonestown, where 10 families are currently quarantined. That meant volunteers could no longer help provide meals to the children and families there. Meagher had a hunch that people would pay for the flower bombs, especially if they knew they would be supporting a good cause. “On a whim I talked to the women in my art class and they all said, ‘We’re in,’” Meagher says. “I thought, ‘I’ll throw it up on Facebook and see what happens.’ It went nuts.” Since beginning on April 28, Meagher says the flower bombing project has raised more than $8,000 to continu...

Oct 15, 2020

‘We’ve Come A Long Way’: Raimondi’s Florist Expanding Thanks To Surge In Online Orders Amid Coronavirus Pandemic - CBS Baltimore

BALTIMORE (WJZ) — Nearly 100 years after opening its doors, a Baltimore business is expanding in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.Due to a recent boost in business and growing demand, Raimondi’s Florist is expanding to meet the community’s needs. Raimondi’s has been a staple not only in Baltimore but the florist industry nationwide since 1934. “So this was our dream, and it come [sic] true,” Paul Raimondi, the business’ president, said. Raimondi recalled when his grandfather, an Italian immigrant, opened a small grocery store 86 years ago near Pimlico selling individual flowers out of buckets. “We’ve come a long way,” Raimondi said. “Never would my parents have dreamed of anything like this from that small little grocery store.” Like countless other businesses’ Raimondi’s faced significant challenges when the pandemic forced storefronts to close back in March. Since then, online orders have picked up 47 percent. In order to meet the growing demand, with the help of KLNB and a part...

Feb 1, 2020

Valentine's Day flowers don't have to be so bad for the environment after all - San Francisco Chronicle

ReVased operates a flower recycling service in New York and Baltimore that will pick up the old flowers free of charge. Those hosting a big event with lots of floral arrangements can contact ReVased in advance to schedule a pick-up. The company repackages the flowers for its delivery service. For every arrangement purchased, ReVased also donates flowers to nonprofits including Levindale Geriatric Center and Hospital, Goddard Riverside Senior Center, and Ronald McDonald House in New York.Sisters Arielle and Aviva Vogelstein started ReVased in 2019 after getting married and realizing how many of their wedding flowers ended up in the trash. Although ReVased primarily works with weddings, it also repurposes flowers from business conferences, bar mitzvahs, and holiday and birthday parties. "We think there is too much waste involved and want to make ourselves as accessible as possible," Arielle says.The sisters' venture received a boost from two tech accelerators, Conscious Venture Lab and AccelerateBaltimore, through which they raised $125,000 in funding. Next up, they hope to expand their operation into Washington D.C.For ReVased's delivery service, which starts at $29 for one bouquet a month, the arrangements always comprise 10 to 20 stems, but the actual flowers are a surprise each month. "The beauty of our service is that we operate under the mentality of you get what we get," Arielle says. "It's very seasonal and event-dependent." It's long been a secret in the wedding industry that donating flowers to charity after the ceremony can be a tax write-off, a convenient benefit considering the average U.S. wedding costs almost $30,000. Nonprofits such as the Knoxville, Tennessee-based Random Acts of Flowers don't resell blooms but instead help facilitate these donations. Founded in 2008, the group works with hospitals and nursing homes to brighten patients' days with the leftover flowers, which come from weddings, funerals, and grocery store surplus. In the past 10 years, it's delivered more than 340,000 bouquets and repurposed more than 356,000 vases. April Churchill, founder of the Reflower Project in Boston, has a similar goal with her nonprofit, which she started in 2015. Florists, event planners, and wholesalers in the metropolitan area can contact her to pick up their surplus, which the Reflower Project then donates to nursing homes and women's shelters such as Rosie's Place. It's not only good for the environment but also patients' recovery. A 2009 study showed that those in hospital rooms decorated with flowers and potted plants needed less postoperative pain medication, had lower blood pressure and pulse rates, and were less anxious and tired than those without. "You can really see the difference with flowers and how much joy they can bring people," Churchill says. a href="https://blockads.fi...

Feb 1, 2020

Roses are red, violets blue. Turns out Valentine’s flowers can be recycled, too - Los Angeles Times

ReVased operates a flower recycling service in New York and Baltimore that will pick up the old flowers free of charge. Those hosting a big event with lots of floral arrangements can contact ReVased in advance to schedule a pick-up. The company repackages the flowers for its delivery service. For every arrangement purchased, ReVased also donates flowers to nonprofits including Levindale Geriatric Center and Hospital, Goddard Riverside Senior Center and Ronald McDonald House in New York.Sisters Arielle and Aviva Vogelstein started ReVased in 2019 after realizing how many of their own wedding flowers ended up in the trash. Although ReVased primarily works with weddings, it also repurposes flowers from business conferences, bar mitzvahs and holiday and birthday parties. “We think there is too much waste involved and want to make ourselves as accessible as possible,” Arielle says.The sisters’ venture received a boost from two tech accelerators, Conscious Venture Lab and AccelerateBaltimore, through which they raised $125,000 in funding. Next up, they hope to expand their operation into Washington D.C. It’s long been a secret in the wedding industry that donating flowers to charity after the ceremony can be a tax write-off — a convenient benefit considering the average U.S. wedding costs almost $30,000. Advertisement Nonprofits such as the Knoxville, Tenn.-based Random Acts of Flowers don’t resell blooms but instead help facilitate these donations. Founded in 2008, the group works with hospitals and nursing homes to brighten patients’ days with the leftover flowers, which come from weddings, funerals, and grocery store surplus. In the last 10 years, it’s delivered more than 340,000 bouquets and repurposed more than 356,000 vases.April Churchill, founder of the Reflower Project in Boston, has a similar goal with her nonprofit, which she started in 2015. Florists, event planners, and wholesalers in the metropolitan area can contact her to pick up their surplus, which the Reflower Project then donates to nursing homes and women’s shelters such as Rosie’s Place. It’s not only good for the environment but also for patients’ recovery. A 2009 study showed that those in hospital rooms decorated with flowers and potted plants needed less postoperative pain medication, had lower blood pressure and pulse rates, and were less anxious and tired than those without. “You can really see the difference with flowers and how much joy they can bring people,” Churchill says.

Dec 18, 2019

Obituary: Storey Lynne Johnson Hart - Montclair Local

Mrs. Hart’s primary oncologist, Armando Sardi, M.D., at Mercy Medical Foundation, Surgical Oncology Research Fund, 227 St. Paul Place, Baltimore, MD 21202.#mc_embed_signup{background:#fff;clear:left;font:14px Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;width:100%}...

Dec 18, 2019

Obituary: Doris C. Tyransky, of Brookfield | Brookfield - Brookfield, CT Patch

Doris C. Tyransky, 73 of 31 Shamrock Drive, Brookfield, passed away on Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019 at her home. She was the wife of Jack Tyransky.Born in Baltimore, MD, daughter of the late Leroy and Anna Jacquette, she graduated from the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing in Baltimore. Her family moved to Danbury in 1972 and then to Brookfield in 1977. Doris worked as a nurse at Danbury Hospital for 30 years, retiring in 2002.Doris had a lifetime interest in painting, gardening, the outdoors and traveling with family and friends. Her greatest passion was the love of her family and she especially enjoyed spending time with her five grandchildren. She selflessly volunteered her time serving on the Brookfield Parks and Recreation Committee and the Interfaith Aids Ministry.Doris was predeceased by her son-in-law, Jason Lewis.In addition to her husband of 52 years, survivors include her daughters: Kerri Eannarino and Donna Lewis, her son-in-law Brett Eannarino. Her grandchildren: Brooke, Kent, Jack, Max and Grace; and her sister Anne Roche.Her faith in God, love of life and love of family shined through her courage during significant continuous health challenges. She met these challenges with dignity, great...