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From Roxy To You

Order flowers and gifts from From Roxy To You located in Jamaica NY for a birthday, anniversary, graduation or a funeral service. The address of the flower shop is 9744 102Nd St, Jamaica New York 11416 Zip. The phone number is (718) 954-0755. We are committed to offer the most accurate information about From Roxy To You in Jamaica NY. Please contact us if this listing needs to be updated. From Roxy To You delivers fresh flowers – order today.

Business name:
From Roxy To You
Address:
9744 102Nd St
City:
Jamaica
State:
New York
Zip Code:
11416
Phone number:
(718) 954-0755
if this is your business: ( update info) (delete this listing)
Express you love, friendship, thanks, support - or all of the above - with beautiful flowers & gifts!

Find From Roxy To You directions to 9744 102Nd St in Jamaica, NY (Zip 11416) on the Map. It's latitude and longitude coordinates are 40.6860666600816, -73.8412120981435 respectively.

Florists in Jamaica NY and Nearby Cities

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(0.36 Miles from From Roxy To You)
10303 101 Ave
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11112 Atlantic Ave Unit 5
South Richmond Hill, NY 11419
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13301 Crossbay Blvd
Ozone Park, NY 11417
(1.08 Miles from From Roxy To You)

Flowers and Gifts News

Sep 7, 2020

Edible Flowers: Put the Bloom on your Plate • Salt Lake Magazine - Salt Lake Magazine

Establishment honors its name with rose petals in pastries. At Hell’s Backbone Grill, you’ll find flowers sprinkled exuberantly on everything and the Jamaica (hibiscus) margarita at the late Alamexo was a best-seller. So get with it and go grocery shopping in your garden.THE RULESWester Garden Center offers guidelines:Only consume organically- grown flowers.If you’re not sure something is edible, look it up before eating.Use flowers in moderation— don’t serve a whole bowl of blossoms. Duh.Only use the petals—not the pistils, stamens or stems.Here are some wild and garden flowers you can harvest for the dinner table: Dandelion, Indian Paintbrush, Rose Petals (Great in spinach salads), Nasturtiums, Hibiscus, (Find dried hibiscus, or Jamaica, in Hispanic or Latino grocery stores), Violets and Pansies, Herb Flowers (basil, lavender, wild mustard.)Western Gardens, 1550 S. 600 East, SLC, 801-364-7871; 4050 W. 4100 South, 801-968-How to crystallize flowers: Wash flowers or petals and let them dry thoroughly on a paper towel. Beat one egg white with 1/4 teaspoon water. Pulverize granulated sugar in a blender or use super fine sugar. Place a rack over another paper towel and using a small new, clean paintbrush, carefully paint each flower or petal completely with egg white. Be sure there are no bare spots. Sprinkle the flower or petal with sugar to totally cover and place on rack until dry.

Feb 1, 2020

6 Plants and Flowers Native to Florida That You May Not Know About - Florida Insider

The Porter weeds Stachytarpheta spp.) come in many wide varieties of flowers, and they can be found not just in Florida but in countries such as Jamaica, Bahamas and other areas all over the Caribbean and Asia. The Porter Weed gets its name from medicinal properties bestowed upon them in the Caribbean and in Florida. Some of South Florida’s native plants may not be as striking as some of their more exotic counterparts. However, some do possess attractive foliage, colorful fruits, or add a pleasing form or texture to the landscape. South Florida has a wide variety of native plants that are both attractive and useful as landscape plants. 4. Marlberry Marlberry (Ardisia escallonioides) in Pine Island Ridge Natural Area, Davie, Florida, USA. Photo Credit: Holly Guerrio/Shutterstock.com The Marlberry (ardisia escallonioides) is actually a fast-growing, evergreen small tree or shrub with dark green foliage. Clusters of small cream-colored flowers make this plant an attractive sight to behold. The plant also provides fruits for birds. It grows about 10-15 ft. tall, although it can get as tall as 20 ft. They can be planted with other flowers and plants in the same space, creating a beautiful, scenic view of a garden or front yard. Their multiple trunks can stand out when trained well into a small tree and can be lighted at night, creating a magnificent display. 5. Jamaican caper Another interesting flower native to our sunny Florida (Miami) is the Jamaican caper (capparis cynophallophora). Jamaica caper flowers are quite showy, with two-inch-long purple stamens and white anthers and white petals. The evergreen, glossy leaves of this small shrub are folded together when they first open up to give the plant a bonze appearance. They can be trained into small plants as well, working well in soils with good drainage. Jamaican caper flower. Photo Credit: www.ebay.com/ 6. Bougainvillea Showy ornamental bracted carmine pink blooms of magnificent weeping colorful bougainvillea. Photo Credit: alybaba/Shutterstock.com The bougainvillea (Nyctaginaceae) is a popular, pretty-flowered plant here in warm Miami, Florida. Indeed, it is a popular ornamental plant that can be seen hung as a decoration in many south Floridian homes and gardens. Although native to South America (“buganvilea” in Portuguese and “buganvilla” in Spanish is representative of the languages spoken in this continent’s countries), bougainvillea is very populous here in Miami. Almost any and every house along the streets of Miami can have a garden full of bougainvillea and are probably the pride and joy of every abuelita. The fact that it’s a drought-tolerant plant helps it survive the harsh Miami summer mont...

Jan 4, 2020

Hibiscus and Rose Cosmopolitan - The Epoch Times

Hibiscus and rose cosmopolitan. (Nassima Rothacker) Hibiscus Syrup You can buy dried hibiscus flowers, also known as Jamaica flowers, in Mexican and Caribbean grocery stores, as well as from online suppliers. Makes 3 cups 1/2 cup (3 1/2 ounces) granulated or caster sugar 3 cups water 3/4 ounce dried hibiscus flowers Juice of 1 lime Put the sugar in a saucepan and add the measured water. Heat over a low heat, stirring occasionally, until the sugar has dissolved. Bring to the boil and add the hibiscus flowers, then simmer for about 30 minutes. Take off the heat and stir in the lime juice, then cover and leave to infuse for 30 minutes. Strain the contents of the pan through a fine sieve into a wide-necked jug or bowl, then pour the liquid through a funnel into a sterilized bottle. Leave to cool, seal, and store in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. Recipe reprinted with permission from “How to Drink Without Drinking: Celebratory Alcohol-Free Drinks for Any Time of the Day” by Fiona Beckett. Published by Kyle Books. ...

Dec 18, 2019

Obituary: Peter Bartlett - Press Herald

Pete met the love of his life, Shelly Elliott, on a blind date, and they eloped in Jamaica on Jan. 5, 1993. Together, they created a life in Yarmouth, with their son, Jackson, and daughter, Lauren. Pete’s children were his pride and joy. He was an active parent and helped coach his children’s many teams, including baseball, soccer, basketball, and football. He loved being a parent in the stands, with his many friends in the community. Pete enjoyed spending time with his family and friends and was well known for his infectious laugh. He was a very humble man who had a positive outlook on life with a straightforward philosophy – work hard, be true to your friends, take care of your family, and do the right thing. So many people have their own stories of how Pete did the right thing by them. Pete is survived by his loving wife, Shelly, and children, Jackson and Lauren, all of Yarmouth. He is also survived by his parents, Jim and Phyllis of Hampden and Melbourne, Fla.; brother, Scott (Jackie) of Melbourne, Fla.; mother-in-law, Martha Elliott of Rumford; sister-in-law, Brenda (Walter) McCallister, of Standish; aunt Carol LaGrange and aunt Elaine (Ken) Buckley, all of Bangor; uncle Thomas (Linda) Carmichael of Lynnfield, Mass.; aunt Judy Craig of Snellville, Ga.; uncle, Frank Hollis of Rockport; nieces, Jessica and Jena Bartlett; nephews, Ben and Kyle McCallister; as well as many cousins. He was predeceased by his grandparents, Rodney and Flora Carmichael, and Albert and Ann Bartlett, his father-in-law, Joseph Elliott, and aunt Sue Hollis. Visiting hours will be held at Lindquist Funeral Home, 1 Mayberry Lane, Yarmouth, Maine, 04096, on Monday, Dec. 16, from 2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. Funeral services will be held at First Parish Congregational Church, 116 Main St., Yarmouth, Maine, on Tuesday, Dec. 17 at 10 a.m. Friends and family are invited to sign the online guest book and share memories with the family at www.lindquistfuneralhome.com In the spirit of the Christmas season, the family will be collecting new, unwrapped toys, hats, mittens, gloves, and socks that will be donated to those in need. Items can be dropped off at the service and reception location...

Nov 9, 2019

The Emotional Impact of Flowers in the Home - Jamaica Observer

Shikima HindsWeddings, Events and HospitalityConsultantTel: 876-925-4285Email: shikima@shikimahinds.comwww.shikimahinds.comNow you can read the Jamaica Observer ePaper anytime, anywhere. The Jamaica Observer ePaper is available to you at home or at work, and is the same edition as the printed copy available at http://bit.ly/epaperlive ...

Jun 22, 2019

Ruby red, tart and floral, dried hibiscus puts a tropical twist on drinks, desserts and more - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Let steep 5 to 10 minutes and then enjoy hot or iced. A traditional Mexican drink, agua de Jamaica or hibiscus water, uses sugar to balance the tea’s natural tartness; the refreshing tea is served over ice with the midday meal. Hibiscus is a natural fit for sultry summer cocktails. Vodka, gin, rum and tequila all play well with hibiscus, along with ingredients like pineapple, lemon, lime, ginger and mint. An easy way to add a tropical touch to an everyday drink is to have hibiscus simple syrup at the ready. Using equal parts sugar and water, along with dried hibiscus in the ratio mentioned above, bring everything to a boil until the sugar is dissolved, then strain out the flowers and keep it in the fridge for whenever the mood strikes. The syrup is also great for splashing into sparkling water or freshly squeezed lemonade. Desserts are another place where hibiscus shines. The flower’s flavor is mild enough that it won’t dominate a recipe, but its magenta hue will turn heads, bringing a festive, feminine touch to the end of any meal. I’ve been dreaming up a homemade ice cream flavored with hibiscus and raspberries. The flowers also can be used to color and flavor cake and frosting; in baked goods, hibiscus would pair well with vanilla bean, buttermilk or blueberries. Any dessert involving coconut could be made better by first steeping hibiscus into coconut milk. (Think panna cotta, flan, pudding or mousse.) Savory preparations for hibiscus are harder to come by, but I could see using it in a meat glaze along with cranberries or cherries or using its brilliant color to enhance a vinaigrette dressing. There’s also a recipe for enchiladas with hibiscus flower that’s popping up on vegan menus. To purchase dried hibiscus flowers for culinary use, look in the bulk spice section at natural food stores like Outpost, Mexican grocers (labeled as “flor de Jamaica”) or online. You can store the dried flowers in an airtight container for several months. RELATED: Hibiscus is the flower that's good enough to drink (and eat) RELATED: Alcoholic seltzer created in a Fox Point kitchen shares shelf space with White Claw, Truly Counter Culture zeroes in on a single food or ingredient (or sometimes, a technique) to help readers broaden their horizons in the kitchen. Ashleigh Spitza is a registered dietitian and freelance writer in Wauwatosa.

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