Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Cicero, NY

Find local Cicero, New York florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Cicero and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Cicero Flower Shops

Guignard Florist

6420 State Route 31
Cicero, NY 13039
(315) 699-7513

Lotts O'flowers

6236 Louwayne Place
Cicero, NY 13039
(315) 699-7774

Cicero NY News

Dec 28, 2016

Demolition planned for former K House of Flowers property

The side-yard variation is being requested for a planned 16-unit, 3 1/2-story structure that would be built on a vacant parcel near Montrose and Cicero avenues. The site recently was rezoned to B2-3 for the project. Project attorney Thomas Pikarski said that normally there are no side setback restrictions for commercial properties but that the variation is required because the site is next to a three-story apartment building on a residentially zoned lot west of it. The setback would be 6.54 feet instead of the required 10 feet. Arena has expressed support for the proposed apartment building. The Zoning Board of Appeals is expected to hear the variation request early next year. Also in the 45th Ward, development plans remain undecided for the site of the former Archdiocese of Chicago food processing plant at 5150 N. Northwest Highway. Plans had called for the building to be converted into a self-storage facility, but Arena had the property rezoned to prevent the project. Brugh said that the city and building’s owner are trying to come to an agreement which would lead to a project that would do more for the area’s economic vitality than a storage facility. A neighboring industrial building is for sale, and Arena has called for a unified redevelopment project for the block. Meanwhile, the Chicago Plan Commission this month is expected to approve a plan to build a one-story retail center at 6340 N. Northwest Highway, where a Starbucks coffee shop with a drive-through facility already is under construction. Currently the site, which was once a vehicle storage lot for a dealership, is zoned for manufacturing uses, and the commission is considering the impact that the project would have on the industrial corridor which runs along Northwest Highway between Jefferson Park and Edison Park. The existing M1-1 zoning permits restaurants but not retail uses unless most of the products are produced on site. Plans call for the site to be rezoned to B3-1, which is intended for shopping districts. (Nadig Newspapers)

Dec 15, 2016

Flower business blooms for generations

As newlyweds, he and his wife, Helen, opened our first flower shop in Cicero in the early '20s and began raising their children in an apartment above the shop. Today, seven full-time family members spanning three generations are active in the business, and we still have that love of flowers and passion for great design. … Things were just so different back then. I think my grandfather dropped out of school in sixth grade. Nobody does that anymore." Did the city of Naperville help you or hinder you in your plans? "As small-business owners, we wear a lot of hats. Naperville made it easy to open. We started in the mid-'90s, when we acquired an existing flower shop in 5th Avenue station. And over the years we just migrated to a free-standing location on Ogden Avenue. Naperville has been very supportive." What is the best thing about being located in Naperville? "The best things about Naperville are its residents and local businesses. It's a vibrant, upbeat, growing city that still has village charm and a very real sense of community." What is the biggest challenge about being located in Naperville? "I don't feel we really have any. So I'm just kind of blank on that one. You know, every city or village is a little different. We are in nine towns, eight flower shops, a main floral design center and a plant operation in Oak Brook. They are all different, but they are all similar." When is your busiest time of year? "Traditionally, December is the biggest month, Mother's Day the biggest week, and Valentine's the biggest couple of days, but with birthdays, new babies, weddings, special events and funerals, we florists stay busy all year long. Flowers are just such a vital part of so many important occasions." What is the most popular product you sell? "At our stores, the top sellers are roses, take-with bouquets, custom arrangements for every occasion, and local wedding flowers. At our headquarters in Westmont, we focus on even larger weddings and events. We also design family funeral flower tributes for many of Chicagoland's finer funeral homes." What is the thing you most like to do as part of your business? "We love working with our customers and delighting them with beautiful fresh flowers, creative designs and the personal service that only a real local florist can provide." What is your least favorite service to provide? "If it involves flowers and serving our customers, we love it." What is the best thing about owning your own business? "The sense of accomplishment and the positive impact we can have on our customers, employees and local community." What is the biggest downside to owning your business? "The paperwork." Tell us about the most memorable customer you had... (Chicago Tribune)

Nov 18, 2016

Central New Yorkers remember suffragette with flowers, stickers, balloons on her grave

New York residents today are taking time to remember a local woman who fought for the right for women to vote. Matilda Joslyn, who was born in Cicero in 1826 and lived for years in Fayetteville, was one of three founding members of the National Woman Suffrage Association, along with Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Today, people are leaving "I voted" stickers, flowers, flags and "Thank You" balloons on her headstone in Fayetteville Cemetery. ErinLeigh Darnley, of Fayetteville, was one of the people outside the Matilda Joslyn Gage House holding up signs. She said it was a way to "bring Matilda's voice to life."Kira Maddox syracuse.com  A few blocks away, volunteers with the Matilda Joslyn Gage Foundation waved signs in front of Gage's home at 210 E. Genesee St. The signs read "Beep if you voted" and "Don't forget to vote" and included Gage's picture. "We didn't want to remain silent," said ErinLeigh Darnley, of Fayetteville, who was waving a sign outside the Gage home which is now a museum. "This is our way to bring Matilda's voice to light." Sheila Sicilia, of DeWitt, brought a bouquet to Gage's grave. She said Gage is an unsung hero in the shadow of Anthony. "Everybody's leaving stickers at Susan B's grave," she said. "Let's give Matilda some lov... (Syracuse.com)

Nov 9, 2016

Evanston celebrates 'Day of the Dead'

Gloria Bernard of Evanston. There was live music and dancers from the Academy of Mexican Dance and Music of Cicero performed. Karie Angell Luc is a freelancer. (Chicago Tribune)

Nov 9, 2016

Central New Yorkers remember suffragette with flowers, stickers ...

New York residents today are taking time to remember a local woman who fought for the right for women to vote. Matilda Joslyn, who was born in Cicero in 1826 and lived for years in Fayetteville, was one of three founding members of the National Woman Suffrage Association, along with Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Today, people are leaving "I voted" stickers, flowers, flags and "Thank You" balloons on her headstone in Fayetteville Cemetery. ErinLeigh Darnley, of Fayetteville, was one of the people outside the Matilda Joslyn Gage House holding up signs. She said it was a way to "bring Matilda's voice to life."Kira Maddox syracuse.com  A few blocks away, volunteers with the Matilda Joslyn Gage Foundation waved signs in front of Gage's home at 210 E. Genesee St. The signs read "Beep if you voted" and "Don't forget to vote" and included Gage's picture. "We didn't want to remain silent," said ErinLeigh Darnley, of Fayetteville, who was waving a sign outside the Gage home which is now a museum. "This is our way to bring Matilda's voice to light." Sheila Sicilia, of DeWitt, brought a bouquet to Gage's grave. She said Gage is an unsung hero in the shadow of Anthony. "Everybody's leaving stickers at Susan B's grave," she said. "Let's give Matilda some lov... (Syracuse.com)

Sep 28, 2016

What my trip to Rome taught me about American democracy: Christine Flowers

Caesars. What saved Rome was its laws, and its lawmakers, men such as Marcus Aurelius, Cato the Elder, and my personal hero, Cicero. As I walked through the Forum, the idea that Cicero had put his feet on the same stones and raised his voice in defense of democracy in this same airspace and criticized despots in the shadow of the same statues and arches made me shudder. It was 95 degrees in the afternoon sun, and I had chills. You might wonder what any of this has to do with Aleppo, or our presidential elections, or logic. You might even take issue with the fact that law saved Rome, because we all know what happened when the Visigoths came to town. Rome is gone, yet it lives on. Laws are still modeled after those enacted two millennia ago, and the principles of virtue, excellence, honesty, humanity and even harsh but appropriate punishment flowed from the work and philosophies of the men who still, in memory, haunt the ancient ruins. As I wandered around lost in my thoughts, I realized that, no matter how bad it gets, democracy is resilient. We will not win or lose civilization based on the personality we elevate to office. Caesar was assassinated, as were his assassins, and we still attribute great things to him. Cicero was murdered for dissenting, and he is considered the greatest writer of any generation. We can and do try mightily to destroy the better parts of what we have created in this world, this Western legacy of a civilization left in rubble and reincarnated in the laws and philosophies of its descendants, but we ultimately can't kill it. I guess the reason I was overcome with emotion at the Forum was this sense that neither Clinton nor Trump, flawed and unworthy as each might be, can destroy what is eternal about us, about democracy and civic virtue. I will weep no matter who wins, but I am not so myopic as to believe that if either of those horrible, toxic people takes office, it will be the end of the world as we know it. It took a trip outside of my country to see that, something Gary Johnson wouldn't appreciate. It took a consideration of dynasties rotting from within or thugs and bullies running amok to see that one human being is ultimately incapable of killing democracy. Clinton and Trump can figure out what that means. All that matters is that through suffering and struggle, democracy ultimately survives. Christine Flowers is an attorney and a columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. Her works appears on Sundays on PennLive. Readers may email her at cflowers1961@gmail.com. (PennLive.com)