Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Babylon, NY

Find local Babylon, New York florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Babylon and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Babylon Flower Shops

The White Iris Floral Co.

192 Deer Park Ave
Babylon, NY 11702
(631) 321-4747

Babylon NY News

Jan 4, 2020

Quantum Hydroponics Services presented by Quantum Flowers LTD - Health Europa

Eventually one day while talking with friends, the hanging gardens of Babylon came up in conversation and my thoughts drifted back to studying history at school and pictures of terraced gardens along the Nile. The penny dropped with Nutrient Trickling Technique (NTT). The architect probably never thought of it that way – he was just building an impressive display. The hanging gardens of Babylon were built with clay blocks and bricks, with water pumped up and running over the staircase of clay, trickling over and around the roots. No soil was involved and over time there may have been a layer of leaf mulch, effectively shading the root structures. Clay being virgin soil is full of micronutrients and the water eroded the clay whist at the same time feeding the plants. The hanging gardens of Babylon was fabled to grow large plants and the fact is it did, probably huge ones. Nutrient trickling technique creates static electricity which in turn creates a turbo effect on the plant, allowing the uptake of nutrients and liquid for growth to be accelerated. Did that knowledge originate from the stars as a lot of ancient knowledge is thought to be? From researching and reading articles found online relating to static electricity being created by water pumped at pressure via a plastic pipe, along with reading other articles showing that electrically charging plants results in considerable improvements compared to plants which are not charged. This led me to continue experimenting with the Quantum system and carrying out some tests. Impressive results I took two eight plant herb units one of which had plants smaller than the other. The larger plants were supplied a pump with a timer of 12 hours on and 12 hours off for five days and when the smaller plants reached a similar size the pumps were switched back on. The smaller plants were a little behind at first but by harvest time the smaller plants became larger. The experiment has been repeated with similar outcomes, confirming the theory of static being a turbo charger. Furthermore, static electricity and NTT eradicates Root rot. Could this be because of the qualities of water? This article (https://skullsinthestars.com/2011/05/27/water-has-properties-that-are-positively-electrifying/) is very interesting reading if you are that way inclined. Showcasing my creation using herbs the unit entered the National Gardening Awards in association with UK Style TV at Olympia, one of London’s premier exhibition centres and scooping two awards for the best environmental conservation or wildlife product and best garden machinery or equipment. The judges were amazed at the individuality which originated from 8 different varieties all living in the same environment. Not having the good fortune to be herb farmer living in London, along with restrictions in the UK and not knowing the right people to explore Quantum’s applications for growing cannabis, I decided to shelve the project in 2007 and wait for a more favourable time. In December 2018 I discovered LinkedIn and the Legal Cannabis Group leading to the rebirth of the project. I decided to build a vacuum forming machine assuming that the troughs would be perfect, although I got a rude awakening. Going back to the drawing board and after some brainstorming, I eventually settled on using four-inch pipes. Firstly, it was two tubes with a stand, one end feeding into a nutrient tank and the other holding ten plants. This was presented to a few people but neve...

Jun 2, 2017

King Kullen Expands Its Shop OnLine Delivery Service

Island, let alone one where personal shoppers pick items with such a high level of care.The Bay Shore King Kullen now offers delivery to Amityville, Babylon, Bay Shore, Bellmore, Brentwood, Brightwaters, Commack, Copiague, Deer Park, East Islip, East Massapequa, Farmingdale, Islip, Islip Terrace, Lindenhurst, Massapequa, Massapequa Park, Merrick, North Bellmore, North Great River, North Massapequa, North Merrick, North Wantagh, Oakdale, Plainedge, Seaford, Wantagh, West Babylon, West Islip, West Sayville, Wheatley Heights and Wyandanch. The Bridgehampton King Kullen is delivering to Amagansett, Bridgehampton, East Hampton, Hampton Bays, North Haven, North Sea, Northwest Harbor, Noyack, Sag Harbor, Sagaponack, Shinnecock Hills, Southampton, Springs, Tuckahoe, Wainscott and Watermill.The Garden City Park King Kullen delivers groceries to Albertson, Baxter Estates, Bellerose, Bellerose Terrace, Brookville, Carle Place, Douglaston, East Hills, East Norwich, Elmont, Floral Park, Flower Hill, Franklin Square, Garden City, Garden City Park, Great Neck, Great Neck Estates, Great Neck Gardens, Great Neck Plaza, Greenvale, Harbor Hills, Hempstead, Herricks, Hicksville, Jericho, Kensington, Kings Point, Lake Success, Lakeville Estates, Little Neck, Manhasset, Manhasset Hills, Manor Haven, Mineola, Munsey Park, Muttontown, New Cassel, New Hyde Park, North Hills, North New Hyde Park, Old Westbury, Plainview, Plandome, Plandome Heights, Plandome Manor, Port Washington, Queens Village, Roslyn, Roslyn Harbor, Roslyn Heights, Russell Gardens, Saddle Rock, Saddle Rock Estates, Salisbury, Sands Point, Searingtown, South Hempstead, Syosset, Thomaston, Uniondale, Upper Brookville, Westbury, West Hills, Willison Park and Woodbury. The Island Park King Kullen delivers to Arverne, Atlantic Beach, Baldwin, Barnum Island, Bay Park, Bayswater, Cedarhurst, East Atlantic Beach, East Rockaway, Edgemere, Far Rockaway, Freeport, Harbor Isle, Hewlett, Hewlett Bay Park, Hewlett Harbor, Hewlett Neck, Inwood, Island Park, Lawrence, Lido Beach, Long Beach, Lynbrook, Malverne, North Lynbrook, Oceanside, Point Lookout, Rockville Centre, Roosevelt, Saddle Ridge, South Valley Stream, Valley Stream, Wave Crest, Woodmere, Woodmere Park and Woodsburgh.Spen...

Sep 14, 2016

CHRISTINE FLOWERS | Disgusted by anti-Catholic rhetoric

If it was not for the Hispanics." And this: "(Paul Ryan) is rubbing his social justice Catholicism in my nose every second." And this: "That Whore of Babylon stuff, who's to say it's not really true?" OK, OK, he didn't say the last one. He might have thought it, but he didn't say it. Still, I wouldn't put it past Donald Trump's new campaign chief executive to say something along those lines, and still get thunderous applause from Trump supporters, even Catholic ones. On my own Facebook page, after posting a link to Bannon's comments, some of my virtual friends fired back about the pedophilia scandal and sanctuary cities, as if there was a direct correlation between Bannon's rather racist implications and the very real problem of weak or fluid borders. There isn't. You can legitimately have concerns about the interplay between unemployment, criminal justice, national security and the broken immigration system without plunging deeply into the oozing La Brea Tar Pits of bigotry known as "the national discussion on political pandering." In fact, I'm all for a real discussion about sanctuary cities, because I generally oppose any system that allows criminals, regardless of their immigration status, to slip through the hands of our police and prosecutors. Call it "sanctuary city," call it "political correctness," call it whatever you want, the safety of those living in this country must trump every other consideration. Every other. But I won't allow slurs against my faith to be justified by irrelevant and off-point debates about illegal immigration. Bannon basically said my church was in the business of supporting illegal immigration so that it could pad its numbers and add money to the weekly collection plate. He knew exactly what... (Kitsap Sun)

Sep 7, 2016

Flowers: Times are not changing for Catholics

If it was not for the Hispanics.” And this: “(Paul Ryan) is rubbing his social justice Catholicism in my nose every second.” And this: “That Whore of Babylon stuff, who’s to say it’s not really true?” I won’t allow slurs against my faith to be justified by irrelevant and off-point debates about illegal immigration. Bannon basically said the church was in the business of supporting illegal immigration so that it could pad its numbers and add money to the weekly collection plate. He knew exactly what he was doing when he conflated “immigrant” with “Hispanic,” puckering up for that high-pitched dog whistle that identifies all “undesirable foreigners” as papists. The man is not only offensive. He’s wrong. While most Mexicans, Central and South Americans and other Latinos self-define as Catholics, a very large minority are evangelical Christians or belong to one of the other Protestant denominations. This is something that’s been lost on Bannon, who presumably whispers in Trump’s ears. And I’m thinking that’s because it’s an easy thing to slam the Catholic Church these days, which has been living through a rather dark period. I’m used to dealing with that attitude from some liberals who never saw a vestibule they didn’t want to refurbish as a transgender bathroom. I’ve dealt with the rants of pro-abortion rights Catholics who have added abortion to the list of sacraments and who see absolutely nothing immoral or evil in allowing “other people” to choose infanticide. Yes, I said infanticide. Sorry if that upsets you. But as much as I’m repulsed by the left-... (Online Athens)

Mar 11, 2016

Slow Flower Movement Focuses on the American Floral Industry

The whole movement is really growing, which is great,” says Arthur Williams, florist and owner of Denver’s Babylon Floral. “But it’s also manipulating people to thinking they are sometimes getting something more local than they actually are.” Indeed, “local” can mean different things to suppliers and consumers. But for agricultural products, the Consolidated Farm & Rural Development Act defines “local” as any product transported less than 400 miles from its origin or the state in which it is produced. In the U.S., 75 percent of domestically grown flowers come from California, which may not exactly be considered “local” to Coloradans, but it’s a lot closer than South America.  Here in Colorado, consumers can expect to find floral farmers who grow a range of culinary herbs, succulents, and fresh-cut flowers like sweet peas and peonies. (Check out Zephyros Farm & Garden in Paonia or the Fresh Herb Company in Longmont.) Some varieties are grown out in the open air, while others stay protected inside the safety of atmosphere-regulated greenhouses. “[Colorado] used to be the carnation capital of the world, but now it’s easier to purchase a cheaper product from farther away,” says Williams, noting that the carnation industry dwindled in the 70s due to the rising cost of fuel for heating and air-conditioning greenhouses. “Now I personally source things that can be grown here—like blooming branches.”  If you’re interested in buying American blooms, ask your florist where the cut flowers originated or look for the Certified American-Grown logo, which assures consumers that their blooms are of U.S. origin and assembly. Some grocery stores, like Whole Foods, also place signs indicating distance traveled and the name of the farm where their flowers were harvested.  “Slow flowers is a slow process,” says Weddel. “We let it go—as a floral industry—to move out of the country. It’s going to take a while to get back to the way it was 25 years ago.” Editor's Note 2/16/16: This article previously stated that Lisa Weddel is a board member of the Society of American Florists. She's actually the board chairperson for Professional Floral Communicators International, which is a committee of the SAF. We regret the error.  ... (5280 | The Denver Magazine)

Mar 11, 2016

Why You Should Buy Local Blooms This Valentine's Day

The whole movement is really growing, which is great,” says Arthur Williams, florist and owner of Denver’s Babylon Floral. “But it’s also manipulating people to thinking they are sometimes getting something more local than they actually are.” Indeed, “local” can mean different things to suppliers and consumers. But for agricultural products, the Consolidated Farm & Rural Development Act defines “local” as any product transported less than 400 miles from its origin or the state in which it is produced. In the U.S., 75 percent of domestically grown flowers come from California, which may not exactly be considered “local” to Coloradans, but it’s a lot closer than South America.  Here in Colorado, consumers can expect to find floral farmers who grow a range of culinary herbs, succulents, and fresh-cut flowers like sweet peas and peonies. (Check out Zephyros Farm & Garden in Paonia or the Fresh Herb Company in Longmont.) Some varieties are grown out in the open air, while others stay protected inside the safety of atmosphere-regulated greenhouses. “[Colorado] used to be the carnation capital of the world, but now it’s easier to purchase a cheaper product from farther away,” says Williams, noting that the carnation industry dwindled in the 70s due to the rising cost of fuel for heating and air-conditioning greenhouses. “Now I personally source things that can be grown here—like blooming branches.”  If you’re interested in buying American blooms, ask your florist where the cut flowers originated or look for the Certified American-Grown logo, which assures consumers that their blooms are of U.S. origin and assembly. Some grocery stores, like Whole Foods, also place signs indicating distance traveled and the name of the farm where their flowers were harvested.  “Slow flowers is a slow process,” says Weddel. “We let it go—as a floral industry—to move out of the country. It’s going to take a while to get back to the way it was 25 years ago.” Editor's Note 2/16/16: This article previously stated that Lisa Weddel is a board member of the Society of American Florists. She's actually the board chairperson for Professional Floral Communicators International, which is a committee of the SAF. We regret the error.  ... (5280 | The Denver Magazine)