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Florists in Adams, NY

Find local Adams, New York florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Adams and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

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Adams NY News

Aug 3, 2020

Downingtown’s Petals Please recycles wedding and funeral flowers into free bouquets for lonely seniors - The Philadelphia Inquirer

Inquirer Morning Newsletter Get the news you need to start your day “It’s such a little gesture,” founder Beth Adams, of Downingtown, said. “But it’s so uplifting.” And not just for bouquet recipients, added Tina Sauk, a retired florist who lives in West Grove and is among 140 Petals Please volunteers: “Even though I don’t know the recipients, it doesn’t matter. The bouquet is made with happiness and given out of love.” The seed that became Petals Please started germinating about two years ago, while Adams, a retired pharmaceutical marketing professional, was working at a hospice. “I went to a local florist and to a funeral home to ask if they had flowers that would [otherwise] be discarded,” recalled Adams, 64. “Myself and a staff member put together little bouquets for patients.” Adams also was inspired by the reaction of a family friend who had once been an avid gardener. “I sent over some flowers I had arranged, and he was so thankful,” she said. “He just missed his garden so much.” Doing research online, Adams found no national organization, let alone a template for putting together a sustainable, all-volunteer flower recovery and repurposing system. But a Northeastern Pennsylvania group was having great success with an approach similar to her idea. So she drove to Scranton, where the volunteers of Petals for Goodness Sake were “so generous and so helpful,” Adams said. “It was, OK, let’s do this.” She began networking from home, calling friends and neighbors. “Because I worked in hospice I knew all of the nursing homes and the assisted living places, and I knew a lot of staff there,” said Adams. “Unfortunately, I knew a lot of funeral directors.” In July 2018, a volunteer picked up the first donation and returned ”with so many flowers in her SUV you couldn’t even see her.” Petals Please has since shifted its arranging sessions from Adams’ dining-room table to a space at Downingtown United Methodist Church. Flowers and vases or other containers are donated, and everything gets recycled, including flower petals, which get taken to a chicken farm in Malvern. Amelia Wondrasch especially enjoys that task. A 15-year-old student at Episcopal Academy in Newtown Square whose family is close to the Adamses, she has been a volunteer pretty much from the beginning. “I’ve always been a big one for recycling and composting,” she said. “And I love the idea of be...

Jun 19, 2020

Company uses flowers to send message during local protests - Richmond Free Press

Ms. Shaw, who is African-American. The statues — Mrs. Walker’s at Broad and Adams streets in Downtown, and Mr. Ashe’s on Monument Avenue, were along the demonstration routes. “I wanted a way for my company to help more in the black community,” said Ms. Carr, who plans to donate from her floral sales to various organizations supporting Richmond’s African-American community. With the help of staff and flower donations from Fourteen Acres Flower Farm, Ms. Carr and Ms. Shaw placed flowers around the two monuments on the last weekend in May. Mrs. Walker’s descendants were heartened. “That was a beautiful thing as we experience the protests going on in Richmond and the rest of the country,” said Liza Mickens, 22, the greatgreat-granddaughter of Mrs. Walker. She learned about it when she received a tag on social media by Ms. Shaw, a longtime friend, who had posted a photo of the statue that was ringed with flowers. “That gesture not only embraced Maggie Walker, who believed the future is in the hands of the youths, it embraces and champions black voices, which is what the monument is all about,” Ms. Mickens said. “It’s great that we are using all of our talents to champion the cause,” she continued. “The protests and conversations are a continuation of the historic fight for empowerment, equality and equity for all Americans. But it is my generation’s responsibility to leave the world in a better place than when we came into it.” Ms. Carr has a similar view of history and current events. “It is sad that police are targeting African-Americans and that economic and educational discrimination is still ingrained in American society, especially after the protests in the 1960s and early ’90s.” She continued, “All lives don’t matter until black lives matter.” ...

Feb 1, 2020

Plants not seen in Ohio in decades found in Summit, Portage counties - Akron Beacon Journal

Ohio in the 1930s — found in Portage County in September; the black-stemmed spleenwort — a type of fern last seen in Ohio in 1900 — found in Adams County in May; and Vasey’s pondweed — an aquatic plant last seen in Ohio in 1935 — found in Lorain County in June.Gardner said the water marigold was found at a natural lake in Portage County. He said he couldn’t provide additional information, as the landowner who found the species on their property wants to remain anonymous.The Vasey’s pondweed was found by Cleveland Metroparks and Lorain County Metro Parks employees working on aquatic invasive species, while the black-stemmed spleenwort was found by a group of college students studying biology.Garder said finding even one of these kinds of species in a year is impressive, but finding four is almost unheard of."It really tells you that there's still opportunity to find these species," Gardner said. "To find these species that have very specific habitats and very small, narrow niches in our ecosystems is really special."The focus will now be on protecting the habitats where these rare plants were found to ensure the populations there survive and thrive.In Long Lake Fen, Bissell said he’ll be working to remove invasive species — including phragmites, or reed grass; glossy buckthorn, a nonnative shrub that forms dense stands; and narrowleaf cattail — that threaten the rare plants and other native species at Long Lake."I know we're not done finding rare plants there," he said of the fen. "It seems like every couple years, we find something new."Contact reporter Emily Mills at 330-996-3334, emills@thebeaconjournal.com and @EmilyMills818. ...

Jan 4, 2020

Obituary for Rick Martin - Greeley Tribune

Journey Christian Church, 4754 W. 31st St., Greeley. In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts may be made to “Realities for Children” in care of Adamson, 2000 47th Ave., Greeley, Colo. 80634. Friends may leave condolences at AdamsonCares.com.

Oct 10, 2019

Gardening datebook: Giving away free buckwheat plants to help save butterflies in Orange County - Los Angeles Times

Blvd., Rolling Hills Estates. southcoastbotanicgarden.orgOct. 19Meadow Planting workshop at the L.A. Arboretum. Crescent Farms staff members Leigh Adams and John Latsko explain how to grow a meadow from seed using native and compatible flowers. Free to arboretum members and non-members who pay $9 general admission fee ($6 seniors and students with ID). 10 a.m. to noon at the arboretum, 301 N. Baldwin Ave. in Arcadia. arboretum.orgThe wildflowers of Western South Africa is the topic of this month’s meeting of the Southern California Daylily and Bulb Society, with a travelogue and photos by Tom Glavich, owner of the Skyview Succulents nursery...

Oct 10, 2019

Flowers Become an Unlikely Means to Discuss Identity and Politics - Hyperallergic

Derrick Adams, “Figure Walking into the Light 24” (2018), acrylic paint, pencil, and fabric on paper, 24 x 18 inches (courtesy of the artist)More menace greeted me around the corner, in a rope with the world’s creepiest hair clip cinching the center. In Diana Sofia Lozano’s “SubRosa” (2019), the thorny, green stems of roses became claws. You won’t find relief in the petals either; thick and velvety, they resemble a mouth that could swallow the viewer. Every part of this flower inspires fear: The hair clip resembles a noose, perhaps for a victim choked by femininity.Other works are more ambiguous, and, in some cases, seemed inscrutable to me. Derrick Adams’s paint-and-textile collage, “A Figure Walking Into the Light 24” (2018), is a quasi-cubist profile of a Black man wearing a flower-print shirt. He appears to be immersed in contemplation, melancholy but determined. William Villalongo uses velvet as his canvas for “Brother, Brother” (2019). Small slashes in the velvet reveal multiple floral, plant, and insect motifs underneath; I saw daisy petals, geodes, statues, and African masks. Glimpsing the images beneath the surface feels like embarking on an archeological dig.From left to right: Natalia Nakazawa, “Language of Birds” (2019), jacquard woven textiles and tapestry, 71 x 53 inches (courtesy of the artist); William Villalongo, “Brother, Brother” (2019), acrylic, cut velour paper and pigment print collage, 39 7/8 x 39 3/8 inches, sheet 45 x 44 3/8 x 1 7/8 inches framed (courtesy of the artist and Susan Inglett Gallery, NYC, photo by Stefan Hagen)figure id="attachment_514964" aria-describedby="caption-attachment-514964" class="wp...