Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Florists in Dartmouth, NS

Find local Dartmouth, Nova Scotia florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Dartmouth and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Dartmouth Flower Shops

Flower Trends Florists

114 Woodlawn Rd
Dartmouth, NS B2W2S7
(902) 434-5150

Janet's Flower Shop

69 Portland St
Dartmouth, NS B2Y1H1
(902) 463-9484

Laura J's Flowers

Cole Harbour Road
Dartmouth, NS B2V1E6
(902) 433-3189

Dartmouth NS News

Nov 15, 2018

'Corpse flower' that smells like dirty diapers to bloom

AP) � Just in time for Halloween, a rare "corpse flower" that gets its nickname from its putrid smell is expected to bloom next week at Dartmouth College's greenhouse.Named Morphy, the titan arum is native to Sumatra's equatorial rainforests and has a long, pointy stalk with a skirt-like covering and tiny yellow flowers at its base. It blooms just for several days. When it does, it has an odor described as rotting flesh, a decaying animal or even soiled baby diapers.The plant is decorated with bats, spiders and an arm reaching out of the soil, holding a sign that says, "Help me!" It's been growing several inches a day. By Friday morning, it reached 71.5 inches (1.82 meters).Visitors can go to the greenhouse or see the plant on Dartmouth's webcam .The 15-year-old lime green and burgundy plant last bloomed in 2016, and before that, in 2011. Last time, it reached a height of 7 feet, 6 inches (1.98 meters)."The older a corpse plant gets, the more likely it's going to flower more often," greenhouse manager Kim DeLong said.Morphy's getting bigger, too. DeLong said after the last bloom, the plant grew a large leaf that reached 10 feet (3 meters), nearly touching the greenhouse ceiling. The leaf stayed open for 13 months and was busy photosynthesizing and storing up energy...

Oct 26, 2018

Dartmouth's ultra-stinky corpse flower is set to bloom again

At Dartmouth a rare corpse flower named Morphy is getting ready to bloom again, producing a pungent odor that has been compared to the smell of a dead rat or dirty baby diapers.The enormous plant is expected to bloom at Life Sciences Greenhouse on campus sometime next week and will be open for about three days.A corpse flower (Amorphophallustitanum or titan arum) typically blooms only about once every seven or eight years; however, 15-year-old Morphy just bloomed two years ago in September 2016, topping out at an impressive height of 7 feet, 6 inches. The super-sized, stinky plant drew a crowd of more than 5,000 visitors. Here's the link to a time lapse of Morphy blooming in 2016: youtube.com/watch?v=wWscTuz8puM.The corpse flower has the largest unbranched inflorescence in the world and appears as a single bloom exhibiting striking color, bright lime green on the outside with a dark burgundy on the inside. Its ruffled collar called a spathe encircles the thick, central stalk that resemble...

Oct 26, 2018

Dartmouth's stinky 'corpse flower' is set to bloom again

From Dartmouth News Service: At Dartmouth a rare corpse flower (Amorphophallus titanum or titan arum) named Morphy is getting ready to bloom at the Life Sciences Greenhouse on campus. Once in bloom, the enormous plant will have a pungent odor that has been compared to the smell of a dead rat or dirty baby diapers. Morphy is expected to bloom sometime next week and will only be open for about three days. A corpse flower typically blooms only about once every seven or eight years; however, 15-year old Morphy just bloomed two years ago in September 2016, topping out at an impressive height of 7'6". The super-sized, stinky plant drew a crowd of more than 5,000 visitors. (Include me and my wife – David) Here's the link to a time lapse of Morphy blooming in 2016: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWscTuz8puM. The corpse flower has the largest unbranched inflorescence in the world and appears as a single bloom exhibiting striking color, bright lime green on the outside with a dark burgundy on...

Feb 9, 2017

Snowy day a challenge for 719 Boulder finishers

Travis Jones encouraged several hundred spectators and volunteers at the finish to go out and pat down the finish line approach.      Former Dartmouth College All-American cross-country skier Silas Talbot, 24, of Bozeman, Mt. was first across the line in 1.33:42, one second ahead of Brian Gregg, 32, of Minneapolis, Minn. (1.33:43) in a two-man sprint to the line.      Talbot is a 2015 Dartmouth engineering graduate originally from Anchorage, Ak. and Gregg, from Winthrop, Wash. was a University of Alaska All-American before becoming a 2014 U.S. Olympian. Talbot’s top time was 16:29 slower than Nick Hendrickson’s 2016 win.      Allison said, “The racers were so whipped. The top guys were just tapped, so different from last year. Same with the Elite Women, who started their race in the snow.      “But you know what meant the most to me? The last woman coming to the finish (Gloria Ploss, 71, of Bend, Ore. in 4.51:52). We were just rolling up the finish when she came in, followed by Sean Petersen, who for years has cleared the course and skied in with the final Boulder Tour finisher.      “The look on her face was incredible. She felt so proud of herself. It brought a tear to my eye and reminded me what this race is all about.      “It was awesome. We did a lot of improvising with the wet conditions, but I’m just happy we pulled it off.”      Repeating as Boulder women’s winner in 1.40:19, 16:24 slower than last year, was Caitlin Gregg, 36, a 2010 Olympian from Minnesota. Just one year ago, after winning the Boulder, Gregg captured the World Championship bronze medal in 10k freestyle in Sweden.      Nate Struebel of Driggs, Idaho and the Teton Valley Ski Foundation won the Half Boulder in 47:39, and Dartmouth College senior Natalie Flowers of Belgrade, Mt. was the top Half Boulder woman, 52:04.      Ketchum’s Charley French, 90, won his age class and placed 115th overall in the Half Boulder, the 43rd man, in 1.29:55.      Local women on the Full Boulder age-class podium were June Lane, Carol Monteverde, Linda McClatchy, Kim Nalen, Elizabeth Youngman, Deb Cornwell, Muffy Ritz, Liv Jensen, Laura Theis, Mary Rose, Alexa Turzian, Deedra Irwin and Annie Pokorny.      Full Boulder male podium placers from the valley were Del Pletcher, Patrick Simpson, Jon Engen, Bill Nurge, John Reuter, Rogan Brown, Cole Morgan, Sebastian Radl-Jones, Fisher Gardner and Mathias Radl-Jones.      Prize money for the 2017 Boulder Tour was $9,150 with $2,500 going to the male and female winners. Second place finishers earned $1,000 and third placers $500. There was $400 in preem money, plus $750 for male and female winners of five separate waves.      You have to go back to February 1985 to find slower Boulder Tour finishing times, again, because of heavy snow.      That year, the Wood River Valley had near-drought conditions for the month of January and most of December before 20 inches of snow dumped between Thu... (Idaho Mountain Express and Guide)

Jan 12, 2017

Art Notes: Looking Back at the Garden From Afar

Friday, Feb. 3, at 5:30 p.m. The exhibitions at AVA run through Feb. 3. There will be a reception today from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Osher at Dartmouth art gallery for the exhibition “Reality to Abstraction — A Photographic Journey of Perception.” The photographer Mary Gerakaris, a Canaan resident, has shown her work previously at the Library Arts Center in Newport and at AVA Gallery. The show runs through Feb. 24 at the Osher office at 7 Lebanon Street in Hanover. Hours are: Monday through Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Fridays, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. “Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds,” an exhibition at Baker-Berry Library at Dartmouth College, surveys the history, politics and religion of the “Roof of the World.” It has been curated by Senior Lecturer Kenneth Bauer and Associate Professor Sienna Craig. As part of the exhibition, Tibetan artist Tenzin Norbu will be on cam... (Valley News)

Oct 5, 2016

Stinking corpse flower blooming at Dartmouth College

HANOVER, N.H. — A flower that got its nickname from its putrid smell started to bloom Friday at Dartmouth College for the first time since 2011. Named Morphy, the titan arum – or corpse flower – began opening at Friday afternoon at the Ivy League college’s Life Sciences Greenhouse. The 7½-foot flower is expected to be fully open on Saturday before it starts to collapse on Sunday. Morphy has a long pointy stalk with a skirt-like covering. It’s green on the outside and deep red on the inside when it opens. Kim DeLong, the greenhouse manager at Dartmouth, said Morphy was starting to smell like a burning cigar Friday afternoon. At full strength, its odor has been described as a cross between a decaying animal and urine. DeLong said she’s planning to pollinate the flower Saturday, using two paintbrushes and tweezers. The idea is to share seeds and pollen with other conservatories, parks and greenhouses around the world, she said. Titan arum is native to Sumatra’s equatorial rain forests and is among the most popular flowers when it blooms. (Press Herald)