Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Nova Scotia, NS Florists

Find florist in Nova Scotia state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a Nova Scotia city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

Nova Scotia Cities

Nova Scotia State Featured Florists

Flowers Of Chester Ltd

34 Pleasant
Chester, NS B0J1J0

Green Leaf Enterprises

14504 Highway 1
Kingston, NS B0P1W0

Blossom Shop

5560 Fenwick Street
Halifax, NS B3H1P8

Flower Trends Florists

619 Sackville Dr
Lower Sackville, NS B4C2S4

Marie's Flowers, Ltd.

218 Main St
Antigonish, NS B2G2B9

Nova Scotia Flowers News

Feb 27, 2020

Obituary: Catherine "Kitty" Mulroe - Montclair Local

Ireland or with friends on organized trips. Memorable destinations were Nova Scotia, Germany, Rome, Medugorje, Lourdes and the Holy Land. Known as “Nana” to her many grandchildre, Kitty would often fix them milkshakes, deviled eggs or her famous “Nana bread.” Her back door was always open to her offsprings’ friends, who would come and go as if the house were their own.Fiercely proud of her Irish Catholic faith and heritage, she was a parishioner at Our Lady of the Lake Church in Verona and, prior to that, Immaculate Conception Church in Montclair. She was a member of the Rosary Altar Society and the Catholic Daughters of America.Kitty was predeceased by her husband Peter and her son Robert. She is survived by her children John (Bernadette), Peter (Susan), James (Anna), Michael (Catherine), Patricia Farley (Bob), Joseph (Lisa), Brian (Sheri); daughter-in-law Karen (Bill); grand- and great-grandchildren Michelle, Kyle, Jack, Brent, Ryan, Patrick, Victoria, Vincent, Megan, Conor, Brigid, Fiona, Danny, Katie, Catherine, Robert, Peter Michael, Peter Joseph, Michael, Pierce, Alex, Joseph, Elijah, Adrian and Nicole; sister Sheila; and brothers Jim, Tom and Dermot.Visitation will be this Sunday, Feb. 16, from 1 to 5 p.m., at the Hugh M. Moriarty Funeral Home, 76 Park St., Montclair. A mass of Christian burial follows Monday, Feb. 17, 10:30 a.m., at the Church of the Immaculate Conception, 30 North Fullerton Ave., Montclair.In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers, PO Box 302, Maryknoll, NY, 10545. For directions and online condolences visit www.moriartyfh.com.#mc_embed_signup{background:#fff;clear:left;font:14px Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;width:100%}...

Jul 26, 2019

10 stunning flower farms you can visit this summer across Canada - CBC.ca

August–September. Seafoam Lavender, Seafoam, NS At this boutique lavender farm in Nova Scotia, you can visit the fragrant gardens from mid-May through mid-October. The farm shop offers a plethora of all-natural, handmade lavender beauty and food products. Truc Nguyen is a Toronto-based writer, editor and stylist. Follow her at @trucnguyen.

Aug 17, 2018

AMONG FRIENDS: Couple continues to grow business in beef, cut flowers

Nova Scotia Agricultural College. She was thrilled to later get an internship at West River Gardens. "I learned so much working with Bob (Parker) and he is still a great mentor. I've made my share of mistakes but his knowledge has saved me from many more," she said. From there she spent a summer looking after the gardens at Pictou Lodge, developing her sense of what particular plants need to thrive and planning her own garden. She started growing from seed under lights in her West River Station basement but soon learned wood heat did not provide a consistent enough temperature for many plants. "For my birthday, James built me a growing bench; a heated, insulated propagation bench. Since then I can rotate plants in and out and the results are much better." Kaloc, a mechanic with his own tow truck business, has found plenty of use for his skills in the garden business. "I'm always building something, trying to find a better way. We've learned there is a lot of problem-solving in gardening." It was four years ago he jumped into the highland cattle business but he admitted to needing a push toward commercial flower growing. "I had my doubts. Niki was talking flowers and I was thinking maybe tomatoes, maybe cucumbers. But flowers, seriously? The market for flowers has been a big surprise to me. Another thing I've learned is that the people who buy flowers tend to be really sweet people." Allan credits a Northern Opportunities for Business program with allowing her to get her market garden started. Kaloc, who loves draft horses, used his Percherons to break ground for the flower bed. "I like to do as much work as possible with the horses but no, we have no plans to give up our tractor," he added. Much of the pasture land on the Rocklin property has grown over through the years but that makes it a good place for raising highland cattle. "James has done some clearing, but it suits highland cattle because they are good grazers and will chew the alders down and return it to good pasture land," said Allan. Once they are settled at one location, they expect life will be simpler and the garden will also benefit. "I've lost some plants to insects and while there will always be some losses you just have to accept, I think I'd have been faster with the insecticidal soap if I'd been on site fulltime." Right now, she is hoping her sweet peas and zinnias, which seem to be a bit late, will soon burst into bloom and she will have a good crop of fall flowers. "I hope to get back to the farmers' market soon. It is a really supportive environment and I've had great customers in the past." One, in particular, comes to mind. "I was selling regularly to an older woman who had a garden but had to give it up when she moved into an apartment. She told me I gave her back her garden and that just made me so happy." Rosalie MacEachern is a Stellarton resident and freelance writer. She seeks out people who work behind the scenes on hobbies or jobs that they love the most. If you know someone you think she should profile in an upcoming article, she can be reached at r.maceachern@ns.sympatico.ca.

Jul 26, 2018

Jeff Mitton: Elaborate elephant's heads flowers require buzz pollination

New Mexico to Alaska and throughout Canada, except for Newfoundland and Nova Scotia. They were first described from Greenland, where they are found in one or a few tiny populations. The common name elephant's heads aptly describes the shape of the flowers. Each has a bulbous, silvery head, flared and draping ears and a curving trunk held high. Inflorescences are columns composed of dozens of flowers. A plant may have one or many inflorescences and attain a height of 30 inches. Their unusual flower shape has attracted the attention of pollination biologists, who discovered that this species is an obligate outcrosser, incapable of self-pollination. In Colorado, the primary pollinators are at least seven species of bumble bees in the genus Bombus. Advertisement Pollination biologists described specific bumble bee behaviors and floral morphology that convincingly suggest a long-term pattern of coevolution between bees and flowers. The flower has two lateral petals that suggest ears, and a median lower petal. Two upper petals are fused dorsally but not ventrally to form a galea (the elephant's domed forehead) with a rostral extension (the elephant's trunk). The style, or female portion of the flower, extends through the trunk so that the stigma, which receives pollen, protrudes from the end of the trunk. The four anthers are hidden in the galea and they shed pollen through a small ventral opening at the base of the elephant's trunk. How does the bee coax pollen from the anthers, which are inside the galea, or the elephant's head? It lands on the trunk, with its antennae reaching toward the galea. It then uses its mandibles to grasp the median ridge on the forehead, while pulling the lateral petals (ears) with its anterior legs. This brings the rostrum (trunk) beneath th...

Jul 6, 2018

Our Town: Solar flower power more than a cute art installation

Calgary. It's been a long time coming.Daniel Armstrong saw his first roof panel as a kid growing up in Nova Scotia. "Our neighbours put one on their camp out in the sticks where we had no electricity," he says. "My dad was a science teacher so he explained it to me-I just thought it was the coolest thing, that they could generate their own energy." Thirty years later, Armstrong's passion for renewable energy hasn't waned and, three years ago, he shifted his siding business into a full-time solar-installation operation. This week alone, he'll power up homes in Auburn Bay and Springbank and over the course of the summer he and his crew will install systems in churches, schools and homes around the province.For all sorts of convoluted reasons we're not up to unpacking here, Canada is way behind, globally speaking, when it comes to capturing solar power. Germany, Spain, Italy, Japan, China and the U.S. harness the sun to a degree that Canada hasn't yet come close to. To boot, Alberta, despite being the sunniest place in the country, is a laggard nationally. If you ask Armstrong, however, he'll tell you that's about to change-and fast.RelatedBusiness is booming for his company, Longday Solar, and, he says, for other local specialists. "We're the new hub for solar," he says. "Calgary has the most sun after Medicine Hat, and people are starting to realize that if you want it, now's the time."Indeed, there are currently several provincial incentives on offer (solar.efficiencyalberta.