Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Bogota, NJ

Find local Bogota, New Jersey florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Bogota and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Bogota Flower Shops

Bogota NJ News

Sep 7, 2020

Pandemic uproots Ecuador flower industry | Business - Jamaica Gleaner

Nonetheless, small local vendors are still feeling the pain. Sonia Raga, 41, owns a flower shop in Bogota and says her sales are down 70 per cent. She hasn’t paid her rent in two months and had to let go three of her four employees. Though she’s now selling through online platforms, she said the city’s strict lockdown has decimated her business. The dire situation has forced her to contemplate selling flowers on the street like many of the informal vendors circulating the city. “I’ve been a flower professional my whole life,” she said. “I have no other economic activity.” Armando Morales, the owner of a small flower farm in northern Ecuador, is one of the nation’s few growers to see a boost in recent months. The roses he cultivates on his three hectares (7.4 acres) found an unexpected market in Russia. “Most farms closed or lowered their production,” he said. “But being a small farm, we did not reduce staff or sacrifice production, which allowed us to jump in and meet the unexpected demand.” AP ...

Aug 17, 2018

Flower District is next as Manhattan's old markets vanish

From there, the bundle is transferred to a cooled plane in Bogota and flown to Miami. After passing through customs, the package is received by truck drivers, who shuttle it up the East Coast to New York. From start to finish, the process takes three days. The New York flower district dates back to the late 19th century, when immigrants from Eastern Europe, particularly Greece, identified an untapped market: providing flowers for department stores, funerals, and even nearby steamships. "The flower market is a shadow of its former self," says Steven Rosenberg, a third-generation owner of Superior Florist, which was opened by his grandfather in 1930 and then run by his father Sam. "It's still colorful to walk through, but it's nothing compared to what it used to be." Rosenberg's grandfather Louie arrived from Poland in the early 1920s. Living in a tenement on the Lower East Side, he eventually got a job in the Chelsea fur district-that is, until he realized he was allergic to fur. Louie crossed the street and sought out a job as a flower runner; he learned Greek to get a leg up in his new profession, supplementing his fluent Yiddish and clunky English. In 1930, Louie Rosenberg opened his own wholesale shop and began competing with Greek, German, and Irish immigrants to sell fresh-cut flowers. to retailers. This was a time when elegantly dressed men haggled with growers from Long Island. Decades before the jet age, New Yorkers had to make due with hydrangeas and gladiolus from Nassau and Suffolk counties on Long Island. Many immigrants work in the flower district these days, though now they largely hail from Mexico. Frankie Mendez, a salesperson at Caribbean Cuts, has made a career out of selling to clients from Christian Louboutin and Barney's exotic bamboos or purple dancing ladies for catalog and window displays. Mendez was only 12 when he moved to New York from Mexico City. By the time he was 14, he was unloading boxes of flowers in the predawn gloom. Like the elder Rosenberg, he spoke little English, but worked hard to succeed in a physically strenuous environment. "Everyone here starts from the bottom," he says. Now 30, Mendez is a naturalized citizen who has spent more than half his life working on West 28th Street. "I've learned so much here," he says, pausing to tend to a fashionably dressed customer purchasing tropical plants for a photo shoot. "New York is the...

Aug 17, 2018

New York's flower district is dying a slow death as many of Manhattan's markets disappear

From there, the bundle is transferred to a cooled plane in Bogota and flown to Miami. After passing through customs, the package is received by truck drivers, who shuttle it up the East Coast to New York. From start to finish, the process takes three days. The New York flower district dates back to the late 19th century, when immigrants from Eastern Europe, particularly Greece, identified an untapped market: providing flowers for department stores, funerals, and even nearby steamships. "The flower market is a shadow of its former self," says Steven Rosenberg, a third-generation owner of Superior Florist, which was opened by his grandfather in 1930 and then run by his father Sam. "It's still colorful to walk through, but it's nothing compared to what it used to be."Rosenberg's grandfather Louie arrived from Poland in the early 1920s. Living in a tenement on the Lower East Side, he eventually got a job in the Chelsea fur district-that is, until he realized he was allergic to fur. Louie crossed the street and sought out a job as a flower runner; he learned Greek to get a leg up in his new profession, supplementing his fluent Yiddish and clunky English. In 1930, Louie Rosenberg opened his own wholesale shop and began competing with Greek, German, and Irish immigrants to sell fresh-cut flowers to retailers. This was a time when elegantly dressed men haggled with growers from Long Island. Decades before the jet age, New Yorkers had to make due with hydrangeas and gladiolus from Nassau and Suffolk counties on Long Island.Many immigrants work in the flower district these days, though now they largely hail from Mexico. Frankie Mendez, a salesperson at Caribbean Cuts, has made a career out of selling to clients from Christian Louboutin and Barney's exotic bamboos or purple dancing ladies for catalog and window displays. Mendez was only 12 when he moved to New York from Mexico City. By the time he was 14, he was unloading boxes of flowers in the predawn gloom. Like the elder Rosenberg, he spoke little English, but worked hard to succeed in a physically strenuous environment."Everyone here starts from the bottom," he says.Now 30, Mendez is a naturalized citizen who has spent more than half his life working on West 28th Street. "I've learned so much here," he says, pausing to tend to a fashionably dressed customer purchasing tropical plants for a photo shoot. "New York is the only one for me," Mendez says. "If the market moves away, I'll stay here and continue working with flowers."The U.S. flower industry has shifted radically over the past two decades. Page, who has worked in the flower district since 1984, says the industry has always been volatile, ebbing and flowing with the economy. Flowers, after all, are a short-lived luxury that sell well only when people have money to burn. "Nothing has ever been as bad as the recession," Page says from an office above his Chelsea shop. "New York has always been about bling. But after the recession hit, ther...

Feb 8, 2018

Fleeing Venezuelans find work cutting Valentine roses in Colombia

United States for Feb. 14.Angy Velasco, packing boxes of blooms at a farm in Chia north of the capital Bogota, said she fled to Colombia two months ago seeking work."I was forced to come because of the situation in my country," said Velasco, a former insurance worker. "It's been very strange because I've lived my whole life in Venezuela."The 19-year-old earns the monthly minimum wage equivalent to about $276, far more than the $2.20 a month she would get exchanging the minimum wage in Venezuelan bolivars for dollars on the black market.She and other Venezuelan workers at the greenhouse were cautious about speaking to Reuters for fear of being stigmatized by Colombians."I know Venezuelans want to return to our own country ... It's hard for all of us but we have to move forward," she said.HARDEST HITColombia is the Latin American nation hardest-hit by the wave of emigration from its eastern neighbor.The number of Venezuelans living in Colombia jumped 62 percent in the second half of 2017 to more than 550,000, the Colombian migration authority said last month. Less than one-fourth of those people have visas. Most enter across the porous 2,219 km (1,379-mile) border between the two countries."This year there are a large number of Venezuelans who have arrived looking for work," said Dayana Rodriguez, a Colombian who supervises cutting and packing of flowers at Rio Frio, the flower farm where Velasco found work. "Here, we'll give them opportunities as long as they meet company requirements."Many in Colombia feel they owe Venezuelans a debt. Hundreds of thousands of Colombians moved to Venezuela in the 1980s and 1990s, fleeing violent conflict in their country and attracted by jobs in the OPEC country's then-booming oil sector.Venezuelan migrants have faced some violence in border towns where some residents worry about competition for jobs and rising theft. However, Col...

Mar 2, 2017

San Antonio shops, restaurants look to cash in on Valentine's Day

United States ahead of Valentine's Day, at the Ayura flower company in Tocancipa, north of Bogota, Colombia. The National Retail Federation projects total U.S. shoppers will spend $18.2 billion on Valentine’s Day gifts this year. lessIn this Jan. 20, 2017 photo, a worker packs rose buds to be shipped to the United States ahead of Valentine's Day, at the Ayura flower company in Tocancipa, north of Bogota, Colombia. The National Retail ... more Photo: Fernando Vergara /Associated Press Image 2 of 6Andrea Harrison-Mongold, the manager and wedding consultant at Flowers by Snellings in Winchester, Va., creates a Valentine's Day floral arrangement of three dozen roses for a customer Monday, Feb. 13, 2017. Lovers are slated to spend an average of $136.57 on candy, greeting cards, flowers and other romantic items on their dearest compared with $146.84 last year, according to the National Retail Federation. lessAndrea Harrison-Mongold, the manager and wedding consultant at Flowers by Snellings in Winchester, Va., creates a Valentine's Day floral arrangement of three dozen roses for a customer Monday, Feb. 13, 2017. ... more Photo: Je... (San Antonio Express-News (subscription))

Feb 23, 2017

Colombia keeps cocaine from spoiling Valentine's Day flowers

BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — Cocaine is probably the last thing most people think about when buying roses.But every year, police and growers in Colombia must work around the clock to make sure that the romance of Valentine's Day isn't spoiled by the drug, the nation's other major export along with flowers.As much as 330,000 pounds (150 metric ton)s of flowers leave Colombia on 30-plus jumbo cargo planes daily starting in late January, presenting an opportunity for the country's ingenious drug cartels to penetrate the frenzied, overworked chain of suppliers and stash drugs amid the roses."Without a doubt we're a target," said Augusto Solano, president of the Colombian flower exporters' association.Security protocols that the flower industry developed with police begin the moment that refrigerated trucks carrying rose buds depart dozens of flower farms dotting the waterlogged savannah surrounding Colombia's capital. Once the flowers are inside the airport, 100 police offices equipped with 15... (Richmond.com)