Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

New Jersey, NJ Florists

Find florist in New Jersey state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a New Jersey city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

New Jersey Cities

New Jersey State Featured Florists

Dg Dubon Florist

2709 Morris Ave
Union, NJ 07083

Bloom

99 Beauvoir Ave
Summit, NJ 07901

Cynthia's Flower Shop

14 Railroad Ave
Wrightstown, NJ 08562

Haworth Flower Shop

310 St Nicholas Ave
Haworth, NJ 07641

Natalie's Flowers & Gifts

759 Jackson Ave
Elizabeth, NJ 07201

New Jersey Flowers News

Sep 7, 2020

Robert Mercer, CEO who helped win Goodyear War, dies at age 96 - Akron Beacon Journal

But you have to do the right thing by your employees."Mercer’s background Mercer was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey, the son of the late Margaret and George Mercer. His father was a Ford dealer and police commissioner in Roselle Park, New Jersey, a New York City suburb.He had a twin brother, Richard, and older brother Donald, both of whom had successful careers in advertising and broadcasting.Mercer won a baseball scholarship to Ohio University but left after one semester when the U.S. entered World War II and he and his twin were drafted into the Navy. Mercer attended officer candidate school at Yale University and received an officer’s commission, and served on the USS Cleveland. He graduated from Yale in 1946 with a degree in mechanical engineering.He is survived by his wife, Mary (Deuel); they married in 1947. That same year he joined Goodyear as a sales trainee, selling conveyor belt and industrial hose in the company’s Duluth, Minnesota, territory that included Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.He was promoted throughout his years at Goodyear and was named company president in 1978, chief operating officer in 1980 and then chairman and CEO in 1983, succeeding Charles Pilliod. He retired as CEO at age 65, with Tom Barrett taking over the top position."It is not an exaggeration to say that the Goodyear of today would not exist without Bob Mercer," said Rich Kramer, Goodyear chairman, president and chief executive officer."As our CEO during the attempted takeover of the company in 1986, Bob stood firm in his commitment to our associates, to the company, to our customers and to the city of Akron. He not only saved the company from an uncertain fate but used the experience to reposition us for growth in the future. Bob added to the legacy of a great American company and planted the seeds for the Goodyear of the future. Everyone in the Goodyear family owes Bob Mercer a debt of gratitude and appreciation."Other activitiesMerce...

Aug 3, 2020

Obituary: Ann Hope Crawley - Montclair Local

Later, she worked as a newsletter editor and publicist for trade organizations, including Hobby International, and the Hemophilia Association of New Jersey. After she retired, Hope hosted bi-weekly book groups, participated in a Montclair meditation group, volunteered weekly at the Salvation Army on South Fullerton street, and attended daily mass at Immaculate Conception. She was a devoted member of the early-morning water classes at the Montclair YMCA, where she enjoyed a close community of Y enthusiasts.Hope was born in Morristown, N.J., and spent most of her childhood in Waterbury and Watertown, Conn. She attended Trinity Washington University (Class of 1954) in Washington, D.C., and was active in their alumni community.Hope Crawley was known for her generous hospitality — her dining room table was crowded at holidays — and her careful listening.Hope is survived by her eight children: Patricia D’Ambrosio and husband John of Andover, Mass.; Frank Crawley and wife Kries of Kessel-Lo, Belgium; Anne Mernin and husband Michael of Montclair; Michael Crawley and wife Agnes of South San Francisco, Calif.; Joseph Crawley of Montclair; Mary Lea Crawley and husband Rob Pratt of Madison, N.J.: Matthew Crawley of Charleston, S.C.; and Paul Crawley and wife Christine of Glen Rock, N.J. Hope leaves 15 grandchildren: John, Paul, Maria, Frankie, Liesbeth, Ryan, Emily, Nikki, Joseph, Kaitlyn, Henry, Hope Pratt, Alison, Taylor and Brandon and her great grandson Matthew. She is greatly missed by her dog, Ginger.Hope believed in the power of love and forgiveness. She felt blessed to live her adult life in Montclair and gratitude for the community at the Newman Center at Montclair State University, Immaculate Conception, the Montclair YMCA, the Salvation Army and St. John’s Episcopal church. She was deeply inspired by her friends on Montclair Avenue and the unending care and grace of that special neighborhood.Due to the unfortunate circumstances of COVID-19, a memorial will be planned at a future date. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the Parkinson’s Foundation.

Jun 19, 2020

New Hampshire florists see demand bloom despite event cancellations - New Hampshire Business Review

Flowers are natural mood elevators, a fact that behavioral research from Rutgers University in New Jersey confirms. The study measured participants’ reactions to gifts of flowers against gifts of candles or fruit baskets, and only flowers elicited authentic smiles. This is all the more notable in time of coronavirus because these types of grins show up in the crow’s feet or laugh lines area of the face and are discernible behind a mask. More people are also seeking blossoms native to the area, said researcher Kaitlyn Orde at the University of New Hampshire’s Sideman Lab. The number of farms producing field-grown cut flowers in New Hampshire climbed from 64 to 101 farms, an increase of about 60%, in the decade from 2007 to 2017, according to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). “Cut flowers are an increasingly important specialty crop in the state,” said Orde, “and [the spike] illustrates that consumer demand is strong for regionally-grown flowers.” Despite the lack of special events, Bob Cote of wholesaler Baystate Farm Direct Flowers in Bedford says business has been brisk. However, the continued postponement of large gatherings for funerals and nuptials is not hardy news for florists powering through less than ideal conditions. “Weddings are our bread and butter for the summer,” Cote said. Floral shops, like other retailers, are adjusting their operations to address customers’ hesitancy to browse in their aisles. In addition to offering delivery and curbside pickup, Hewson encourages people to visit her open-air greenhouse where she transferred many of her ancillary gift items. She also posted that same inventory on a revamped website. “We’re still using that [the greenhouse and the website] for people who don’t feel comfortable coming into the store,” she said. “Being inventive is what got us through.” Catalysts for compassion ‘We have been crazy, crazy, crazy’ busy, says Shirley Wrenn of Shirley’s Flowers and Sweets in Nashua, who recently added a third vehicle to keep up with demand for flowers. (Photo by Sheryl Rich-Kern) Community well-wishers also helped merchants withstand the pandemic’s aftermath. One customer started what Hewson calls a “flower chain.” In April, Maryanne Jackson of North Conway purchased 20 table-sized bouquets of friezes, roses and greenery from Hewson with a note wishing people “joy and color,” asking them to support small businesses and consider paying forward the gift. Many of the recipients heeded the suggestion and called Hewson’s shop ...

May 1, 2020

NJ nursery brings flowers, holiday cheer to hospital - 69News WFMZ-TV

FLEMINGTON, N.J. - A New Jersey nursery spent Thursday morning bringing holiday cheer to a hospital in Hunterdon County.Hionis Greenhouses delivered Easter lilies to Hunterdon Medical Center in Flemington.2,000 colorful flowers were donated to the hospital and its staff. Recommended for you ...

May 1, 2020

Cleveland florists are still open for delivery, so you can send Easter flowers to loved ones - cleveland.com

COVID-19. It’s been hard to get flowers in.“It’s been really hard for our wholesalers. One of my direct wholesalers are out of New Jersey, they had to shut down completely. So our local ones have very limited product,” Scott Robertson, a co-owner of Stems Fleur, said. “The growers in the Netherlands have been throwing away thousands and thousands and thousands of flowers. It’s been bad all the way up the chain.”“It’s very limited on what we’re able to get in from our wholesalers,” Urban Orchid owner Brandon Sitler said. “We do have a lot in here. It’s just, if you called in and said, “I wanted a peony,” I don’t have peonies in right now.”A Ohio Department of Health spokeswoman, when asked directly whether flower shops count as essential businesses, didn’t answer the question. Instead, she said the businesses still operating need to ensure they are following the stay-at-home order guidelines.“Businesses need to use their common sense on how they interpret the order. If the local health department or local law enforcement showed up, would they have a rationale that they could point to in that order that yes, this is under this provision and this is how we are staying open,” ODH spokeswoman Melanie Amato said. “They also have to prove that they are following all the guidelines set forth in the order.”...