Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Cooperstown, ND

Find local Cooperstown, North Dakota florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Cooperstown and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Cooperstown Flower Shops

Cooperstown ND News

Jan 4, 2020

How a Hawthorne woman's floral creations made it to the White House and the pope - NorthJersey.com

Charlie Miller, bought a farm in Ridgefield Springs, New York, a village 14 miles north of Cooperstown, in 1972. Soil at the 33-acre farm was rich in organic fertilizer, though Miller calls it something else. "The ground had so much cow manure that everything I planted came up gorgeous," Miller said. "I ended up doing five huge gardens." Miller wound up with a multitude of flowers, and at first she did not know what to do with them. "I just sat in the barn, and I said: 'What a waste. All of these flowers are going to die. Can't I try to make their life a little longer?' " Miller recalled. She tried different methods to dry her flowers, finding that some, such as cockscomb, could be dried out simply by hanging them upside-down.

Dec 8, 2016

Newlyweds give wedding flowers to hospital patients in Cooperstown

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. – When a Rochester couple tied the knot in Cooperstown over the weekend, they found some time to make their special day special for others, too. Anna Politano and Tad Ruckert were married at the Otesaga Resort Hotel on Saturday, Dec. 3. Before heading to Canada the next day for a few days of celebration, they collected the flower arrangements from their wedding and delivered them to Bassett Medical Center in Cooperstown to be given to patients. Ruckert is a third-generation obstetrician and gynecologist in his family’s Rochester medical practice, according to Bassett Healthcare Network. He did his cardiology rotation at the Cooperstown hospital in his fourth year of medical school. “I know from being around a hospital environment that the holiday time frame can be particularly difficult on patients, especially if they expected to be home for the holiday season,” Ruckert said. “Anything we can do to make the day brighter for them while they’re in the hospital we’d li... (WKTV)

Dec 8, 2016

On the Bright Side: Newlyweds use flowers to cheer up Bassett patients

Others allow their guests to take the flowers home. A husband and wife who were wed in Cooperstown over the weekend gave their arrangements to patients at Bassett Medical Center. Anna Politano and Tad Ruckert of Rochester, were married at the Otesaga Resort Hotel in Cooperstown on Saturday, according to Bassett officials. The next day, before leaving for Canada on their honeymoon, Politano and Ruckert collected the two dozen French bouquets from their wedding and delivered them to the Cooperstown hospital to be given to patients. The bride and groom have connections to the medical community, they said, so hospital patients are near to their hearts. Politano's mother, Denine Jacob, is director of compensation and benefits at Bassett. Ruckert is a third-generation obstetrician and gynecologist at his family’s Rochester medical practice, and he did his cardiology rotation at the Cooperstown hospital in his fourth year of medical school. His father, G. Theodore Ruckert IV, completed an internship at Bassett in the late 1960s and is vice president of the Bassett Medical Alumn... (Oneonta Daily Star)

Oct 27, 2016

Hawthorne dried-flower designer part of Montclair Art Museum ...

Most of the flowers she had grown herself — either in her raised-bed garden in Hawthorne or at a 33-acre farm near Cooperstown, N.Y. that she and Charlie, her husband of 64 years, have owned for decades. Earlier this week, Miller, a longtime member (and past president) of the Wyckoff Garden Club, gave The Record a preview of her majestic museum creation, which was beautifully displayed on a tall pedestal in a corner of her living room. Holding up a small reproduction of the painting, Miller said, “There’s a lot of blue, and when you see it in person, a lot of green flowed in. And highlights of white. And then, of course, the wharf was all in this brown and curving. Immediately, in my mind, I said, ‘I’ve got some curled pussy willow. So, I used the brown of that and the brown seeded eucalyptus leaves for the outline.” The footed container she used was one she’d had for a long time — Miller buys beautiful old vessels when she finds them — and had kept in storage in her basement. “I never knew what I was going to do with this. And it’s perfect for that [museum display],” says Miller, who was so excited when the idea came to her, she says, she “got up in middle of the night and ran downstairs” to make sure it was still there. Although Miller, a Paterson native had no formal training in flower design, she calls herself a “natural-born arranger” and has been around flowers — and music — her whole life. Her father, John Peragallo, played the piano by ear and founded The Peragallo Pipe Organ Company in Paterson, which still exists. Her mother, Octavia, who had beautiful gardens, was a concert pianist. And Miller, who still plays her piano, performed in concerts from the time she was 7½ until she was 16. In 1945, when she was a 15-year-old sophomore at Eastside High School, the principal asked her to write an alma mater to encourage school spirit. In a week, she composed a song with lyrics and taught it to the student body. In 1988, Warner Bros. called to ask her permission to use the song in the 1989 movie “Lean on Me.” She not only received a payment for that, but got her name in the screen credits. After she and husband Charles Miller moved to Wyckoff in the 1960s, Miller joined the Wyckoff Garden Club — and soon started winning blue ribbons for her designs. In 1976, after Miller won the top creativity award for a dried-flower arrangement at the New Jersey Flower and Garden Show in Morristown, Family Circle magazine commissioned her to do a six-page feature on dried-flower arranging. That article was what caught the attention of Rusty Young, the White House’s longtime chief floral designer— and began a whole new chapter for Miller. After she harvests her flowers, just before their peak, she dries some by hanging them — nowadays in a corner of her husband’s den — and uses a desiccant on most of them. “Most of it now is going into silica gel — all the roses, zinnias, all that goes into silica gel,” says Miller, who wires her dried flowers in advance, to ready them for her shows. Last year, her garden produced a “bumper crop” of flowers, which, post-drying, she stores in containers on shelves in her basement. She now has enough dried flowers to last her four years. An octogenarian, she keeps a fast pace, with bookings into next year. Recently, she says, she got a call from Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pa., one of the country’s premier horticultural display gardens. “They said, ‘Could you do Christmas for us?’ ” recalls Miller,... (NorthJersey.com)

May 18, 2016

Hawthorne dried-flower designer part of Montclair Art Museum display

Most of the flowers she had grown herself — either in her raised-bed garden in Hawthorne or at a 33-acre farm near Cooperstown, N.Y. that she and Charlie, her husband of 64 years, have owned for decades. Earlier this week, Miller, a longtime member (and past president) of the Wyckoff Garden Club, gave The Record a preview of her majestic museum creation, which was beautifully displayed on a tall pedestal in a corner of her living room. Holding up a small reproduction of the painting, Miller said, “There’s a lot of blue, and when you see it in person, a lot of green flowed in. And highlights of white. And then, of course, the wharf was all in this brown and curving. Immediately, in my mind, I said, ‘I’ve got some curled pussy willow. So, I used the brown of that and the brown seeded eucalyptus leaves for the outline.” The footed container she used was one she’d had for a long time — Miller buys beautiful old vessels when she finds them — and had kept in storage in her basement. “I never knew what I was going to do with this. And it’s perfect for that [museum display],” says Miller, who was so excited when the idea came to her, she says, she “got up in middle of the night and ran downstairs” to make sure it was still there. Although Miller, a Paterson native had no formal training in flower design, she calls herself a “natural-born arranger” and has been around flowers — and music — her whole life. Her father, John Peragallo, played the piano by ear and founded The Peragallo Pipe Organ Company in Paterson, which still exists. Her mother, Octavia, who had beautiful gardens, was a concert pianist. And Miller, who still plays her piano, performed in concerts from the time she was 7½ until she was 16. In 1945, when she was a 15-year-old sophomore at Eastside High School, the principal asked her to write an alma mater to encourage school spirit. In a week, she composed a song with lyrics and taught it to the student body. In 1988, Warner Bros. called to ask her permission to use the song in the 1989 movie “Lean on Me.” She not only received a payment for that, but got her name in the screen credits. After she and husband Charles Miller moved to Wyckoff in the 1960s, Miller joined the Wyckoff Garden Club — and soon started winning blue ribbons for her designs. In 1976, after Miller won the top creativity award for a dried-flower arrangement at the New Jersey Flower and Garden Show in Morristown, Family Circle magazine commissioned her to do a six-page feature on dried-flower arranging. That article was what caught the attention of Rusty Young, the White House’s longtime chief floral designer— and began a whole new chapter for Miller. After she harvests her flowers, just before their peak, she dries some by hanging them — nowadays in a corner of her husband’s den — and uses a desiccant on most of them. “Most of it now is going into silica gel — all the roses, zinnias, all that goes into silica gel,” says Miller, who wires her dried flowers in advance, to ready them for her shows. Last year, her garden produced a “bumper crop” of flowers, which, post-drying, she stores in containers on shelves in her basement. She now has enough dried flowers to last her four years. An octogenarian, she keeps a fast pace, with bookings into next year. Recently, she says, she got a call from Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pa., one of the country’s premier horticultural display gardens. “They said, ‘Could you do Christmas for us?’ ” recalls Miller,... (NorthJersey.com)

Feb 2, 2016

Is this the end of the remarkable career of Mark Buehrle?

Gold Glove Award winner over his 16 years in Major League Baseball to go along with his 214 wins and you have to seriously consider talking Cooperstown in five years. Mark Buehrle may not be a first ballot, or even second ballot Hall-of-Famer, but he certainly needs to be in the discussion. He was a modern marvel of longevity, and durability in the era that saw astronomical Tommy John surgeries and pitchers spending seasons at a time on the disabled list. If this is it for Mark Buehrle, and we have seen the last dance for the southpaw workhorse , which all indications point to… This is a sad realization for White Sox fans and baseball enthusiasts alike. What a class act Mark Buehrle was for nearly 20 years in professional baseball, a guy from middle-America who was never the flashiest player on the field, but always that hardest working guy on the field. I can say looking back that as much as I love Paul Konerko, and Frank Thomas, and all the other greats that came through 35th & Shields,  Mark Buehrle is one of my most beloved players ever. So if somehow you stumble across this article in this massive world of publications, I want to say thank you for all of the memories, and thank you for being an admirable ambassador of how the game should be played, and how ball players of any age level should carry themselves. (Southside Showdown)