Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

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Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

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Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections.

Piedmont Flowers & Gifts

Order flowers and gifts from Piedmont Flowers & Gifts located in Monroe NC for a birthday, anniversary, graduation or a funeral service. The address of the flower shop is 6216 Morgan Mill Road, Monroe North Carolina 28110 Zip. The phone number is (704) 283-4994. We are committed to offer the most accurate information about Piedmont Flowers & Gifts in Monroe NC. Please contact us if this listing needs to be updated. Piedmont Flowers & Gifts delivers fresh flowers – order today.

Business name:
Piedmont Flowers & Gifts
Address:
6216 Morgan Mill Road
City:
Monroe
State:
North Carolina
Zip Code:
28110
Phone number:
(704) 283-4994
if this is your business: ( update info) (delete this listing)
Express you love, friendship, thanks, support - or all of the above - with beautiful flowers & gifts!

Find Piedmont Flowers & Gifts directions to 6216 Morgan Mill Road in Monroe, NC (Zip 28110) on the Map. It's latitude and longitude coordinates are 35.082611, -80.46814 respectively.

Florists in Monroe NC and Nearby Cities

204 N Hayne St
Monroe, NC 28112
(0.55 Miles from Piedmont Flowers & Gifts)
200 S Main St
Monroe, NC 28112
(0.58 Miles from Piedmont Flowers & Gifts)
1207 Concord Avenue
Monroe, NC 28110
(1.27 Miles from Piedmont Flowers & Gifts)
3708 Rocky River Rd
Monroe, NC 28112
(6.89 Miles from Piedmont Flowers & Gifts)
202 East Main St
Marshville, NC 28103
(9.82 Miles from Piedmont Flowers & Gifts)

Flowers and Gifts News

Feb 27, 2020

New recreational marijuana shop offers different type of Valentine’s Day flower - MLive.com

Choice Labs and 20 Past 4, are in Leoni Township.This is Kinship’s first location, but the business plans to open additional marijuana shops in Monroe County, near where Molino is from.Of Molino’s four business partners, two of them are his brothers. The Molinos ventured into the marijuana business after one of their brothers died from ALS about a decade ago. Doctors prescribed him medical marijuana pills to help his calorie intake and his nerves, before he died.That’s when the Molinos learned medical marijuana can be “another source of wellness,” and there was opportunity in the market for the brothers to pursue it. Kinship opened for medical marijuana in September before getting a license also allowing them to sell recreationally.Kinship offers flower, cartridges, CBD, edibles, topicals and more, for medical and recreational marijuana, Assistant Manager Kathleen Bailey said."The edible gummies on the recreational side are like hotcakes," Bailey said. "Quicker than I can say 'edible gummies,' they're off the shelf."The 2,400-square-foot building was built from scratch, and two more buildings are on their way up on the property so Kinship can grow and process their own marijuana. From the parking lot to the security system to the building itself, Molino said Kinship wants to dispel stereotypes about what marijuana shops look like."People don't want to have to buy their product in the alley," Molino said. "They want to come here, feel safe and secure, know that the medicine's been tested and it's been tracked."Township limits number of marijuana businessesParma, Pulaski and Leoni townships as well as the city of Jackson are the only communities in Jackson County to opt into allowing recreational marijuana businesses to open up.In Parma, the planning commission decided to limit the number of businesses to two – allowing each business to stack grower, processor and retailer licenses for the same property. The township is limiti...

Nov 9, 2019

Brazos County flower farm hit hard due to freeze - KBTX

We lost about $10,000 worth of floral product last night, "said Georgia Monroe of Basecamp Farms, "Normally it's really pretty but this is just all the frost damage from last night and so it just made it very limp," she said as she walked around the fields of dead flowers. "We had frost everywhere and as you can see we had flowers the flowers had frost all on them so we knew it was a lot worse than we had planned for," she said. They have greenhouses that saved crops for next year but everything outside died. The day before sunflowers stood several feet tall before being zapped by the cold. Now they need to be mowed down. "We normally sell wholesale to florists. We sell to many of the florists in Bryan / College Station. We also have flash sales and you pick here at our farm so obviously we're done right now. But in the spring of 2020 we'll be back," said Monroe. She and her husband Jordan are only in their second season growing flowers. "And I feel like we've experienced it all now so we had extremely wet winter last year. Last winter was really wet before that we had 16 weeks of drought during our first summer," said Monroe. "We're hoping to triple our production this next year...

Jul 26, 2019

Is Norwalk losing another flower shop? - Norwalk Reflector

If you have an item for the business roundup column, send the information to the Norwalk Reflector in care of Zoe Greszler, 61 E. Monroe St., Norwalk, Ohio 44857, or email it to [email protected] ...

Jul 5, 2019

Summer Solstice Marks Beginning Of Fun In Apple Valley-Rosemount - Apple Valley, MN Patch

June 26: Yoga Mindfulness at Falcon Ridge Middle School, Apple Valley June 28, 6 p.m.: Music in Kelley Park Featuring Michael Monroe, Apple Valley July 4, 10 p.m.: 4th of July Fireworks, Apple Valley July 13, 9 p.m.: Free Movie in the Park, Rosemount July 19-28: Rosemount Leprechaun Days Solstice comes from the Latin words "sol" and "sistere," and it literally means "sun stands still." While June 21 is generally recognized as the first day of summer, no authoritative body has ever deemed when the seasons start. For example, Earthsky.org notes that in meteorology, summer starts on June 1. Here are five things to know about the summer solstice: 1. Native American tribes have long observed the summer solstice, and many continue the rituals today. Tribes in present-day Wyoming constructed a "medicine wheel," a stone wheel with 28 spikes at the top of Bighorn Mountain, to observe the solstice. It was aligned with the sunrise and sunset on the solstice, and is accessible only in the summer months. Similar wheels have been found in South Dakota, Montana and parts of Canada. Another ceremonial ritual is the Sundance, originated by the Sioux tribe in the western and northwestern U.S., because it was believed the sun was a manifestation of the Great Spirit. The four-day celebration of singing, dancing, drumming, prayer and meditation, and skin piercing concluded with a ceremonial felling of a tree, symbolic of the connection between the heavens and Earth. 2. Thousands will gather at Stonehenge, a Neolithic megalith monument in the south of England, to celebrate the summer solstice. Stonehenge, built around 2500 B.C., lines up perfectly with both the summe...

May 31, 2019

Novato Girl Scouts troop plants seeds of recovery for monarch butterflies - The Mercury News

A monarch had already found it, already laid eggs and there were already caterpillars,” said Mia Monroe, a Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation volunteer and former Girl Scout who helped with the project. “So it really shows that the effort is worth it.” These types of waystations are critical given the startling news from the beginning of the year. Only 28,429 monarch butterflies were counted across 213 locations in California this past fall — an 86% drop from the 2017 count and a 99% decline since the 1980s, according to the Xerces Society. Compare that with the 48,000 monarchs that could be found at each of the butterflies’ overwintering havens on coastal Marin during the 1980s, according to Monroe. Just decades earlier, monarch butterfly population estimates in California were in the millions. Grace Gatlin, 11, the Troop 31068 scout who came up with the idea of the waystation after meeting with Marin Humane, said she was among the many people who didn’t know of the monarch’s plight. “I just thought they were beautiful orange butterflies,” Grace said. “But then as I learned more, it’s shocking how they’ve gone down from the 1980s.” It’s not entirely clear why there was such a significant drop in monarch numbers in 2018, but late-season storms and the extreme wildfires are believed to have played a role, Monroe said. The decline of monarch butterflies is a decades-old issue. Habitat loss, pesticides and climate change have played a more significant role in the long-term decline of the species, according to the Xerces Society, a national wildlife conservation organization. Marin County used to be a haven for western monarch butterflies when they would travel to areas such as Novato, Corte Madera, San Anselmo and Mill Valley in search of milkweed plants on which to lay their eggs and for nectar plants to build up their fat reserves. The co...

Apr 27, 2019

Wild for flowers: Spring blooming season finally arrives in Pittsburgh region - Tribune-Review

Braddock’s Trail Park, North Huntingdon Allegheny County • Fall Run Park, Shaler • Trillium Trail, Fox Chapel • Indian Hill Meadow, Boyce Park, Monroeville • Frick Park, Squirrel Hill and Regent Square, Pittsburgh • Schenley Park, Oakland, Pittsburgh Elsewhere • Raccoon Creek State Park wildflower reserve, Hanover Township, Beaver • Meadow Run Trail and others, Ohiopyle State Park, Fayette • Fallingwater, near Ohiopyle, Fayette • Flight 93 National Memorial, Stonycreek, Somerset • Wolf Creek Narrows Natural Area, near Slippery Rock, Butler • Mingo Creek County Park, near Finleyville, Washington Renatta Signorini is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Renatta at 724-837-5374, rsignorini@tribweb.com or via Twitter . Wildflower Walk• May 3 and 10, 6-8 p.m.• In the Laurel Highlands area• Registration is required with Rachael Mahony at 724-259-2201 or rmahony@pa.gov TribLIVE's Daily and Weekly email newsletters deliver the news you want and information you need, right to your inbox. More Westmoreland Stories ...

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