Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Cherokee, NC

Find local Cherokee, North Carolina florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Cherokee and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Cherokee Flower Shops

Cherokee NC News

Feb 8, 2018

Tri-Cities business mixing chocolate and charity for Valentine's Day

I give back in my life."Bellafina Chocolates is located at 123 Cherokee Street in Kingsport. Bellafina Chocolates has a special webpage for Kuda Vana set-up here. You can also mention Kuda Vana while checking out online and your money will be earmarked for Kuda Vana. To learn more about the organization, visit the Kuda Vana website.Bellafina Chocolates talks truffle... (WJHL)

Nov 2, 2017

ECOVIEWS: State flowers and trees make statements

Georgia, Vermont and Alabama each picked a non-native species for their state flower. Georgia’s Cherokee rose is no more Cherokee than any other Asian plant that was introduced to the New World in the 1700s. They may be pretty, but they are not native. Cherokee rose is even considered an invasive species in some areas.Vermont, likewise, made the odd choice of red clover as its state flower. Where the first red clover plants introduced to the country came from may be debated, but the origin was certainly Europe, Asia or Africa, not Vermont.Alabama may hold the record for the most perplexing selection of a state flower. In 1959, the legislature replaced goldenrods, beautiful fall-blooming native plants, with camellias. Legend has it that the change was pushed through by garden club ladies who did not think a wild flower should have pride of place.In 1999, legislators specified Camellia japonica as the state flower, thus giving Alabama a pretty Asian bloom as its state symbol. Perhaps in an effort to counter that puzzling decision, at the same time, the oakleaf hydrangea was designated the “official state wildflower.” Goldenrod remains as the state flower of Kentucky and Nebraska. (Despite a widespread misperception, goldenrod does not cause hay fever. The real culprit is ragweed.)The cabbage palmetto, or sabal palm, would be a distinctive state tree if South Carolina, the Palmetto State, had exclusive rights. But Florida picked the same tree. South Carolina’s state flower, the yellow jessamine (aka jasmine), has a trait to be reckoned with. The vines, roots and trumpet-shaped flowers of the jessamine are packed with strychnine, making them poisonous to ingest. Jessamine is even toxic to some pollinators, including honeybees, which would presumably produce some dangerous honey if that were their primary nectar source.Official recognition of trees and flowers as representative of a state can help increase public awareness of regional plant diversity. The same is true for state animals. Selecting a non-native species as a state symbol undermines that goal. Knowing a state’s wildlife symbols (tree, flower, insect, mammal, fish, etc.) should be a requirement for children in school.Having students learn about their state’s symbols can have small but positive impacts, both direct and indirect, on attitudes toward the environment. With a little creative thinking in the classroom, enterprising teachers and stude... (The Star)

Oct 19, 2017

City projects: Summit future, firehall, flowers | The Cleveland Daily ...

There are a number of projects planned for downtown, including continuing discussion of the future of the old Cherokee Hotel (Summit Apartments).City Manager Joe Fivas said the city is continuing to talk with the owners of the historic old building, Summit LLC of Knoxville. The owners would like to reach an agreement with the city to purchase the property, so they can move forward with plans for construction of new residential complex at another location.If this were to happen, all, or almost all, of the tenants of the Summit Apartments would move to that facility.Fivas said negotiations are continuing, but there has been no agreement relating to the city’s purchase of the old hotel. There is also no concensus on how the hotel property might be used. “We’re looking at commercial and residential possibilities,” he said.Other downtown projects include the Inman/Cleveland Greenway Trailhead extension, Taylor Spring Park, a flower basket program, streetscapes, the addition of downtown parking, and work on a downtown master plan.Most easements have been collected for the trailhead extension, and the project is expected to be completed next summer. Taylor Spring Park is ongoing, and fundraising continues. The city council formed a Taylor Spring Advisory Committee to oversee the effort.Taylor Spring is where the city was founded 175 years ago. It is located on 1st Street, just west of the downtown area. It was where early settlers to the community lived, and was called Taylor’s Place for early settler Andrew Taylor.Earthwork has begun, and the committee is working to make the design of this new city park fit into the city’s Greenway system.City staff is working with the MainStreet Cleveland organization in an attempt to beautify the downtown area. Hanging baskets are being placed throughout downtown, with the final results of the projects to be determined by the city’s master plan.Streetscapes will be extensive in the downtown area. Design and planning are underway for Central Avenue, and Edwards, Church, Inman and Parker streets. The city staff is working closely with Lee University on these plans.Plans for additional downtown parking is a major goal of city planners. Negotiations are underway in relation to this effort. “We’re looking to add 100 to 150 (parking) spaces in the downtown area, to relieve traffic ... (Cleveland Daily Banner)

Sep 22, 2017

City projects: Summit future, firehall, flowers

There are a number of projects planned for downtown, including continuing discussion of the future of the old Cherokee Hotel (Summit Apartments).City Manager Joe Fivas said the city is continuing to talk with the owners of the historic old building, Summit LLC of Knoxville. The owners would like to reach an agreement with the city to purchase the property, so they can move forward with plans for construction of new residential complex at another location.If this were to happen, all, or almost all, of the tenants of the Summit Apartments would move to that facility.Fivas said negotiations are continuing, but there has been no agreement relating to the city’s purchase of the old hotel. There is also no concensus on how the hotel property might be used. “We’re looking at commercial and residential possibilities,” he said.Other downtown projects include the Inman/Cleveland Greenway Trailhead extension, Taylor Spring Park, a flower basket program, streetscapes, the addition of downtown parking, and work on a downtown master plan.Most easements have been collected for the trailhead extension, and the project is expected to be completed next summer. Taylor Spring Park is ongoing, and fundraising continues. The city council formed a Taylor Spring Advisory Committee to oversee the effort.Taylor Spring is where the city was founded 175 years ago. It is located on 1st Street, just west of the downtown area. It was where early settlers to the community lived, and was called Taylor’s Place for early settler Andrew Taylor.Earthwork has begun, and the committee is working to make the design of this new city park fit into the city’s Greenway system.City staff is working with the MainStreet Cleveland organization in an attempt to beautify the downtown area. Hanging baskets are being placed throughout downtown, with the final results of the projects to be determined by the city’s master plan.Streetscapes will be extensive in the downtown area. Design and planning are underway for Central Avenue, and Edwards, Church, Inman and Parker streets. The city staff is working closely with Lee University on these plans.Plans for additional downtown parking is a major goal of city planners. Negotiations are underway in relation to this effort. “We’re looking to add 100 to 150 (parking) spaces in the downtown area, to relieve traffic ... (Cleveland Daily Banner)

Sep 8, 2017

Heirloom flowers take root

Senior Center plans to get more flowers from Campbell in the fall. Campbell also plans to donate flowers to Cherokee Baptist Church for their garden. “I want to donate some there at the church where my mom was a member for 60 or 70 years or more,” Campbell said. Her main goal in donating the flowers is to preserve them, she said. “I want some of them where they’ll be preserved because there’s going to come a point in time where I can’t live by myself way out in the country anymore,” she said. “I don’t want them taken over with bushes and weeds and honeysuckle.” Campbell grew up caring for the flowers and has inherited the green thumb of her family members.“I used to say give me something to dig with and a pile of dirt, and I was happy,” she said. “I loved my big vegetable garden and flower garden and working in the yard.” However, for the last year or so it has been difficult to do due to health reasons, she said, and she’s had to have help getting work done outdoors.“I’m afraid those gardening days are over,” Campbell said. “I’d like to see others enjoy (the flowers.) I have a saying, ‘I want my flowers while I’m living, but they won’t do me any good when I’m dead and gone.’” Since the irises at the Senior Center were without flower, she brought photographs of some of her irises in bloom to show their color, a pale blue. “They’re not some of the newer hybrid ones,” she said, pointing to the photograph of her flowerbed at home. “This is an old-timey iris that’s been there forever and ever and ever.” That’s another reason to preserve them, she said, because they are non-hybrid.After gazing at the photo for a moment, she put it away, shaking her head. “I wish my mom knew what all her flowers mean to me.” The Jonesborough Senior Center is located at 307 E Main St. They are open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday. (Herald & Tribune)

Apr 7, 2017

Gardening: Edible dogwoods, pick at peak ripeness

There are even fairies associated with aforementioned tree, with the Cherokee believing that the Dogwood People, a race of tiny benevolent 'brownies', lived in the trees doing good deeds and watching out for those who dwelled nearby.There are other benefits to having a dogwood in the garden and the one we seem to overlook the most are the abundant edible berries or drupes that they bear.The Cornelian Cherry or Cornus mas has the longest history of cultivation, dating back to the ancient Greeks and Romans. This tree is native to southern Europe and adjacent parts of Asia, with the rod-shaped red fruits (which also come in yellow) having a tart cranberry-sour cherry flavour.These are used to process into sauces, syrups and homemade liqueurs – all of which are very high in vitamin C. This species can be grown as a tree or bush form and has very attractive bright yellow flowers that cover the branches starting in late winter, before the leaves emerge.Large pear-shaped fruits are also available from cultivars such as ELEGANT, which hails out of Ukraine.Bunchberry or Cornus canadensis is an often difficult to grow evergreen groundcover that is found across Canada.While notoriously onerous to establish in cultivated gardens (if you want to try, I suggest 1 gallon pot size to start), they are commonly found growing in abundance in open alpine forests, such as those surrounding Whistler.The white flowers are perfect miniatures of the four-petaled bracts found on many tree forms and are followed by clusters of bright red drupes that are high in pectin, making them useful to adding to runny jell... (Maple Ridge News)