Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Florists in Advance, MO

Find local Advance, Missouri florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Advance and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Advance Flower Shops

The Flower Box

306 Gabriel Stpo Box 138
Advance, MO 63730
(573) 722-3528

Valeria's Florals & Gifts

33257 Missouri 25
Advance, MO 63730
(573) 568-9988

Advance MO News

Feb 1, 2020

Sarasota orchid show, now in its 63rd year, has a flower for everybody - Sarasota Herald-Tribune

Monday of every month at 6 p.m.While there’s plenty of room for beginners interested in orchid keeping, there’s also a lot of fun to be had by more advanced enthusiasts. Look no further than retired orchid taxonomist Stig Dalstrom, known as The Wild Orchid Man, who has lived in Sarasota since moving from Sweden in 1997 and spends his time traveling the world and researching orchids with the support of the Sarasota Orchid Society while making documentaries with filmmaker Darryl Saffer.“There’s so much variety. We don’t know how many different kinds of orchids there are; it could be as many as 35,000 different species — we just don’t know. The more we learn, the less we seem to know for certain,” said Dalstrom, who is traveling to Bhutan next week to help with an orchid conservation project administrated by the country’s National Biodiversity Center.And while there are all different types of orchids, the hobby also attracts enthusiasts from all different walks of life, such as Julien Baruch, who studied economics and finance at New College of Florida before graduating in 2018. He now spends his days working with flowering plants at Krull-Smith Orchids in Apopka and, much like Dalstrom, was attracted by the complexity and the immense variety held by the family of flowering plants.“There’s so much more variety than what you see in your average supermarket or Home Depot. There’s so much more to explore than you realize; you’ve just got to keep your eye out for it,” said Baruch. “Keeping orchids is my favorite addiction.” ...

Feb 1, 2020

Roses are red, violets blue. Turns out Valentine’s flowers can be recycled, too - Los Angeles Times

Baltimore that will pick up the old flowers free of charge. Those hosting a big event with lots of floral arrangements can contact ReVased in advance to schedule a pick-up. The company repackages the flowers for its delivery service. For every arrangement purchased, ReVased also donates flowers to nonprofits including Levindale Geriatric Center and Hospital, Goddard Riverside Senior Center and Ronald McDonald House in New York.Sisters Arielle and Aviva Vogelstein started ReVased in 2019 after realizing how many of their own wedding flowers ended up in the trash. Although ReVased primarily works with weddings, it also repurposes flowers from business conferences, bar mitzvahs and holiday and birthday parties. “We think there is too much waste involved and want to make ourselves as accessible as possible,” Arielle says.The sisters’ venture received a boost from two tech accelerators, Conscious Venture Lab and AccelerateBaltimore, through which they raised $125,000 in funding. Next up, they hope to expand their operation into Washington D.C. It’s long been a secret in the wedding industry that donating flowers to charity after the ceremony can be a tax write-off — a convenient benefit considering the average U.S. wedding costs almost $30,000. Advertisement Nonprofits such as the Knoxville, Tenn.-based Random Acts of Flowers don’t resell blooms but instead help facilitate these donations. Founded in 2008, the group works with hospitals and nursing homes to brighten patients’ days with the leftover flowers, which come from weddings, funerals, and grocery store surplus. In the last 10 years, it’s delivered more than 340,000 bouquets and repurposed more than 356,000 vases.April Churchill, founder of the Reflower Project in Boston, has a similar goal with her nonprofit, which she started in 2015. Florists, event planners, and wholesalers in the metropolitan area can contact her to pick up their surplus, which the Reflower Project then donates to nursing homes and women’s shelters such as Rosie’s Place. It’s not only good for the environment but also for patients’ recovery. A 2009 study showed that those in hospital rooms decorated with flowers and potted plants needed less postoperative pain medication, had lower blood pressure and pulse rates, and were less anxious and tired than those without. “You can really see the difference with flowers and how much joy they can bring people,” Churchill says.

Feb 1, 2020

Norma Blanche Pittard Knight, 83, studied the art of Japanese flower arranging - Port City Daily

Norma graduated from Flora McDonald College and taught in public schools for 10 years. She studied the art of Japanese flower arranging, receiving advanced teaching degrees in the Ikenobo and Ohara schools. Norma shared her love of flowers with her closest friends and with garden clubs throughout Eastern North Carolina. She was a member of the Rocky Mount Junior Guild, the Rocky Mount Garden Club and the Cape Fear Garden Club. Norma was preceded in death by her sister, Barbara Pittard Davis; and brother, George Norman Pittard IV. She is survived by her sister, Nancy Pittard Sieler; and brother, Robert Jenkins Pittard. Norma leaves behind her husband of 62 years, Dan Knight and their daughter, Rachel K. McKnight; son-in-law, Vince McKnight; and granddaughter, Maria McKnight, all of Wilmington. The family will receive friends from 5 to 7 p.m., Tuesday, Jan. 7, at Andrews Mortuary, 1617 Market St., Wilmington. A funeral service will be held at 1 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 8, at St. Andrew’s On-the-Sound Episcopal Church, conducted by the Rev. Richard G. Elliot. Burial will be held at 12:30 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 9, at Warrendale Cemetery, Norlina. Memorials may be made to St. Andrew’s On-the-Sound Episcopal Church, 101 Airlie Road, Wilmington, NC 28403. Share online condolences with the family at Andrews Mortuary & Crematory.

Feb 1, 2020

Floral Park requests more time on Belmont project - Featured - The Island Now

Netscape 7.X Select Preferences from the Edit menu. Click the arrow next to Advanced. Click Scripts & Plugins. Check Navigator beneath "Enable Javascript for". Click OK. Finally, Refresh your browser. Netscape 6.X Select Preferences from the Edit menu. Click Advanced Check Enable JavaScript for Navigator Click OK. Finally, Refresh your browser. Netscape 4.X Select Preferences from the Edit menu. Click Advanced. Check Enable JavaScript Check Enable style sheets Click OK. Finally, Refresh your browser. Netscape 4.X for Mac OS 9 Select Preferences from the Edit menu. Click Advanced. Check Enable JavaScript Click OK. Finally, Refresh your browser. Opera (Windows) In the Tools drop-down menu at the top of the window, select Preferences... Select the Advanced tab at the top on the Preferences window. Find the Content item in the list on the left-side of the window and select it. Check the Enable JavaScript checkbox. Click OK to save your changes and close the Preferences window. Finally, Refresh your browser. Opera (MAC) Select the Safari menu item from the Apple/System bar at the top of the screen. From the drop-down menu, select Preferences. Select the Content icon/tab at the top of the Preferences window. Check the Enable JavaScript checkbox./l...

Feb 1, 2020

Celebrate Thanksgiving with beautiful fresh flowers from A Country Flower Shoppe and More, Colts Neck - TAPinto.net

Call in advance at 732-866-6669 and set up an appointment for a consultation. Also known as the Colts Neck Florist, we are located in the Colts Neck Shopping Center next to the Post Office. We are members of Colts Neck Business Association, the Colts Neck Exchange, and we partner with many local fund-raising organizations including PTO's and volunteer groups. We hope you enjoy your online shopping experience with secure 24-hour ordering right at your fingertips. If preferred, you may call us to place orders direct at 732-866-6669. Our friendly design staff takes pride in assisting you with your specific requests and can advise you if you're not sure what to send. To shop and order click HERE.

Feb 1, 2020

Valentine's Day flowers don't have to be so bad for the environment after all - San Francisco Chronicle

Baltimore that will pick up the old flowers free of charge. Those hosting a big event with lots of floral arrangements can contact ReVased in advance to schedule a pick-up. The company repackages the flowers for its delivery service. For every arrangement purchased, ReVased also donates flowers to nonprofits including Levindale Geriatric Center and Hospital, Goddard Riverside Senior Center, and Ronald McDonald House in New York.Sisters Arielle and Aviva Vogelstein started ReVased in 2019 after getting married and realizing how many of their wedding flowers ended up in the trash. Although ReVased primarily works with weddings, it also repurposes flowers from business conferences, bar mitzvahs, and holiday and birthday parties. "We think there is too much waste involved and want to make ourselves as accessible as possible," Arielle says.The sisters' venture received a boost from two tech accelerators, Conscious Venture Lab and AccelerateBaltimore, through which they raised $125,000 in funding. Next up, they hope to expand their operation into Washington D.C.For ReVased's delivery service, which starts at $29 for one bouquet a month, the arrangements always comprise 10 to 20 stems, but the actual flowers are a surprise each month. "The beauty of our service is that we operate under the mentality of you get what we get," Arielle says. "It's very seasonal and event-dependent." It's long been a secret in the wedding industry that donating flowers to charity after the ceremony can be a tax write-off, a convenient benefit considering the average U.S. wedding costs almost $30,000. Nonprofits such as the Knoxville, Tennessee-based Random Acts of Flowers don't resell blooms but instead help facilitate these donations. Founded in 2008, the group works with hospitals and nursing homes to brighten patients' days with the leftover flowers, which come from weddings, funerals, and grocery store surplus. In the past 10 years, it's delivered more than 340,000 bouquets and repurposed more than 356,000 vases. April Churchill, founder of the Reflower Project in Boston, has a similar goal with her nonprofit, which she started in 2015. Florists, event planners, and wholesalers in the metropolitan area can contact her to pick up their surplus, which the Reflower Project then donates to nursing homes and women's shelters such as Rosie's Place. It's not only good for the environment but also patients' recovery. A 2009 study showed that those in hospital rooms decorated with flowers and potted plants needed less postoperative pain medication, had lower blood pressure and pulse rates, and were less anxious and tired than those without. "You can really see the difference with flowers and how much joy they can bring people," Churchill says. a href="https://blockads.fi...