Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Missouri, MO Florists

Find florist in Missouri state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a Missouri city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

Missouri Cities

Missouri State Featured Florists

Linda's Flowers, Inc.

1255 W Battlefield St
Springfield, MO 65807

Darlas Flowers Gifts And Scrapbooki

2015 N 36Th St
Saint Joseph, MO 64506

Rambling Rose Floral & Gift

203 N. Cordie
Seymour, MO 65746

Busy Bee Florist & Gifts

109 N Main St Usa
Marceline, MO 64658

Judy's Flower Basket

202 E. Main St
Festus, MO 63028

Missouri Flowers News

Jun 19, 2020

Purple Heart Recipient, Summit High Grad George Colley Dies, 92 - Summit, NJ Patch

Republic of Korea. According to 2nd Infantry reports from January 1952, PFC Colley's unit was one of four regiments designated to defend the Missouri Line in the area known as the "Iron Triangle." A report goes on to list 1,605 "negro personnel" assigned to the division during this time, with Colley being one of 118 soldiers awarded the Bronze Star Medal for Heroic Achievement in a Combat Zone. On Jan. 2, 1952, Colley received the prestigious Purple Heart Medal, for wounds sustained due to artillery attack. Colley's awards also include the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Medal, the Army Service Ribbon, the Good Conduct Ribbon, and the Combat Infantry Badge. After his service in the Army, George began a career as a civil service employee until his retirement. George is preceded in death by both his loving wife Jeannette and loving parents, as well as the following siblings: Mary C. Nevels, Thomas Colley, Edythe C. Bynum, Arthur Colley, Ruth C. Byrd, Walter Colley, Samuel Colley, Jimmie C. Randel, and infant Adolph Colley. Left to cherish his memories are his siblings Herbert Colley and Juanita Neal (Richard), along with numerous nieces and nephews — including lifelong Summit resident Karen Colley. Scholarship established In lieu of flowers, you can donate to the newly established college scholarship in honor of George Everett Colley at the Zion Union Heritage Museum 276 North St, Hyannis, MA 02601. All Cape Cod, Mass. students who are part of the YMCA Cape Cod Achievers Program are eligible to apply.

Jan 4, 2020

Deaths in Leitrim - Friday, December 6, 2019 - Leitrim Observer

Ballyloughane Road, Renmore, Galway), formerly Carrrickmakeegan, Ballinamore, Co. Leitrim, Convents of Mercy, Ballymahon, Co. Longford, and Columbia, Missouri. Surrounded by family and friends, December 3rd, 2019, (peacefully) at Brampton Care Nursing Home, Oranmore. Predeceased by her sisters Bernadette, Sr. Gabriel and brother Ignatius. Deeply regretted and sadly missed by her sisters, Rita (Fitzgerald), and Noreen (Smith) her brother, Brian, sister-in-law, Anne, brother-in-law Brian Smith, nieces, nephews, grand-nieces, grand-nephews, cousins, many friends and Sisters of Mercy, Western Province. Requiem Mass on Friday, December 6th at 11 a.m. in St. Brigid’s Church, Ballybane, followed by funeral service at Shannon Crematorium, Illaunmanagh, Shannon, Co. Clare, V14 PV30. Family flowers only by request, donations, if desired, to Galway Hospice. Susan Beirne (née Rush), 29 Termon Road, Boyle, Co Roscommon Died, peacefully, on 4th of December, after a short illness, surrounded by her loving family and in the care of St. Annes Ward, St Vincent's Hospital, Dublin. Predeceased by her husband Eugene and mother Rosaleen. Sadly missed by her daughter Anne Marie, sons Patrick Christopher and Eugene, her grandchildren Mikey, Ethan, Elizabeth and Freya, her father Martin, sisters Pauline and Rosaleen, brothers Mark, Brian and Michael, her sons in law Edward, Steve and Rory, daughter in law Rebecca, nieces and nephews, sisters and brothers in law, extended family and friends. Reposing in Mahon's funeral home, Boyle, from 3pm to 6pm, Friday 6th, with arriving to St Joseph's Church, Boyle, at 6.15pm. Funeral Mass at 11am on Saturday 7th, with burial afterwards in Assylynn Cemetery Boyle. House Strictly Private at all times, please, for immediate family only. Donald Daly, The Old Bog Road, Wardhouse, Tullaghan, Leitrim Peacefully at Sligo University Hospital. Funeral Mass on Friday (6/12) at 11am ar St. Patrick's Church, Tullaghan. Burial afterwards in St. Aidan’s Cemetery, Kinlough. May they all Rest in Peace.

Oct 10, 2019

Cheryl O'Farrell, 63 of Montrose, Mo. - 921News

January 31, 1956 – October 7, 2019 Visitation: 10:00am-12:30pm, Saturday, October 12, 2019 at Hill and Son Funeral Home in Appleton City, Missouri Funeral Service: 12:30pm, Saturday, October 12, 2019 at Hill and Son Funeral Home in Appleton City, Missouri Interment: Snodgrass Union Cemetery, rural Bates County, Missouri In Lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to House of Hound or St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital Cheryl Denise O’Farrell, 63, passed away peacefully on October 7, 2019 in Chicago, Illinois. She was the daughter of Donald and Margaret Ann (Herberger) Barry born on January 31, 1956. She spent her formative years in the Appleton City area, where she graduated from high school in 1974. Following the completion of her education, she married Clifford “Hoot” O’Farrell, her husband of 31 years. They shared four wonderful children: Chad, Denise, Sean, and Nathan. Cheryl spent many hours raising her children, and also managed to complete her nursing certificate and cosmetology license. She worked as a CNA for many years at Ellet Memorial Hospital, where many patients benefited from her humor and gentle touch.

Jul 26, 2019

Flowers at nature sanctuaries in Columbia are in full bloom - Columbia Missourian

Together, the two properties span 130 acres, according to the Great Missouri Birding Trail’s website. The Columbia Audubon Society finished seeding native Missouri grasses and flowers in this prairie in 2016. The grassy trails that meander through the prairie treat those who explore them to a bouquet of coneflowers, bee balm, brown-eyed Susans and more.Special thanks to Missourian reader Lois Shelton for telling us about the blooms.

Jul 26, 2019

Beargrass and yucca: two signature Montana plants - Valleyjournal

In the late spring of 1806 during their expedition west, Lewis and Clark discovered and named the plant. However, while traveling along the Missouri River above present-day Yankton, South Dakota, in Sept. 2, 1804, Clark’s journal entry mentions seeing “bear grass” (actually yucca) on the dry river plains. In those days, yucca was called beargrass, and since there is a great deal of similarity between the two, it may explain why Lewis and Clark applied the name “beargrass” to the mountain plant when they encountered it in the Rockies. Interestingly, it isn’t a grass and bears won’t touch it, but mountain goats will eat the leaves, and deer, elk and bighorn sheep dine on the blossoms. On the return trip from the Pacific, as the Corps of Discovery neared what would become Montana, they gathered samples of beargrass plants. On June 26, 1806, Lewis wrote: “There is a great abundance of a species of beargrass which grows on every part of these mountains. Its growth is luxuriant and continues green all winter but the horses will not eat it.” During their long winter at Fort Clatsop in Oregon, Lewis noticed the Clatsop Indians making baskets. He recorded: “Their baskets are formed of cedar bark and beargrass so closely interwoven with the fingers that they are watertight without the aid of gum or rosin; some of these are highly ornamented with strans of bear grass, which they dye of several colors and interweave in a great variety of figures; this serves them the double purpose of holding their water or wearing on their heads.” It is for the construction of these baskets that the beargrass becomes an article of traffic among the natives. This grass grows only on their high mountains near the snowy region: “The young blades, which are white from not being exposed to the sun or air, are those most commonly employed, particularly in their neatest work.” Of the beargrass samples collected on the expedition, two still exist: one at the Lewis and Clark Herbarium and the other at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew near London. Also called “soapweed,” “Spanish bayonet” and, as we have just learned, “beargrass,” yucca blooms from a low cluster of long, pointed, spikey leaves. During the growing season, a tall stalk will emerge and produce large n...