Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections.

Valentine's Flowers

Show her that you want to celebrate your love in the most prefect way, send flowers today!

Valentine's Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Florists in Mexico City, ME

Find local Mexico City, Maine florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Mexico City and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Mexico City Flower Shops

Kisu Floreria

Calle Norte 81 No. 202
Mexico City, ME CP020

Mexico City ME News

Aug 3, 2020

Howard Dungan - Obituary - Legacy.com

Methodist Church in La Mesa, and had a custom home built in Spring Valley where they resided until they passed. They vacationed in Mexico City, and traveled extensively throughout the U.S. and Canada with a succession of travel trailers. These trips were later accompanied by their only child, Michelle Dungan, now a retired California Department of Transportation Associate Environmental Planner. After Anita passed in 2006,Howard eventually resumed travel in a Roadtrek motorhome, completing the last trip to Kearney, Nebraska by himself at age 97, where he was interviewed by the newspaper. Howard flew with Honor Flight to Washington D.C. and spoke to a 5th grade class in Carlsbad that had written letters to the veterans to read on the flight, befriended the teacher, and later attended the middle school graduation for the students. This was the subject of a local news story. Another story was about his flight on a B-25, his first since World War II. On a trip to Hawaii with aniece, he honored a relative killed on the U.S.S. Arizona at Pearl Harbor, his first visit there after the war.Howard worked hard to live as independently as he could, frequented the zoo, read extensively, and watched televised sports until COVID-19 forced him to replace them with old television westerns and more classic movies. A rerun of the original "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo" which featured B-25s like he flew was rarely missed, along with "Catch-22", which he said captured some of the absurdities of the war. He still drove well, shopped, and balanced his checkbookuntil a few weeks before he passed.Howard is survived by his daughter, Michelle Dungan and her wife, Veronica Zerrer; numerous nieces and nephews; friends and former students whose lives he touched; and the family dog, Jacqui, who recently saved him from a bad fall by warning Veronica that he had a leg cramp and was trapped on the steep slope next to a vertical embankment while weeding his yard.Both Howard and Anita supported good public education for everyone, and that would include a broad curriculum helping students understand history, society, and government so they can become good citizens. It must also provide a solid foundation for all students whether they aspire to vocational or to a college education. In lieu of flowers for services at Glen Abbey in Bonita and interment at Fort Rosecrans, please consider a contribution to Honor Flight, or your favorite charity or other group that could support the above educational goals. Published in San Diego Union-Tribune on Aug. 2, 2020.

Nov 28, 2018

The Christmas flower - The Hutchinson News

Montezuma, the last Aztec ruler, even had the plants delivered to him by caravan because they would not grow in the high altitude of Mexico City.The Nov. 25 issue of the Hutch News featured a Sandra Milburn photographic spread of poinsettias. Poinsettias are the best-selling potted plant in the U.S. and Canada, accounting for more than $250 million in annual sales, mostly in the weeks between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Although there are over 100 shades and colors of poinsettias, my personal favorite is still the bright crimson one.That color ties in with one of my favorite legends about poinsettias and their association with Christmas. In 16th century Mexico, a poor peasant girl named Pepita wanted to take a gift to the Christ Child to celebrate his birthday. Having no money, she gathered some weeds from a ditch, fashioned a small bouquet and placed them in front of the crib on Christmas Eve. That evening the scraggly bouquet of weeds burst into brilliant red blooms. All who saw them were convinced they had witnessed a Christmas miracle. In Mexico and Guatemala, poinsettias are referred to Flores de Noche Buena, or Flowers of the Holy Night.Beginning in the 17th century, Franciscan friars in Mexico included poinsettias in their Christmas celebrations. The star-shaped leaf pattern is said to remind people of the Star of Bethlehem, while the red color represents the blood sacrifice of Christ’s crucifixion.Poinsettias might have remained south of the border were it not for the intervention of the first U.S. ambassador to Mexico, Joel Poinsett. Poinsett, a botanist, was so enchanted by the plant he discovered in Mexico that he sent cuttings back to his home in Charleston, South Carolina in 1828. The rest is, as they say...

Oct 26, 2018

Day of the Dead comes to life in Petaluma

Solar, director of Hispanic ministry for St. Vincent de Paul Church, has fond memories celebrating the Day of the Dead when he was growing up in Mexico City. Every year Solar and his family would gather at his grandmother's grave site where they would clean the area, put out fresh flowers, pray and, of course, eat. When a family member dies, they need assistance from those they leave behind so they can properly pass on, Solar said. By bringing food and praying each year, they honor their memory, allowing the dead to successfully navigate the afterlife. "They believed that after leaving the valley of life, you go to the valley of death, but it's always a long journey," Solar said. "You needed food, spiritual guidance and even also the (guide animal) … so you can cross safely without getting lost in the valley of just being forgotten."This year marks the 18th celebration of El Dia de los Muertos Petaluma, and the 2018 theme is "hope," spotlighting the feeling that comes with each new addition to the valley of the life, Solar said."The celebration in Petaluma is part of the community now," he said. "It doesn't belong to any ethnic group. It's a Petaluma festivity. Everybody who wants to honor and share the legacy of their loved ones, who have come before them, the celebration is there to share and build community."Throughout October, events are held to help bring different elements of the celebration to life.The IceHouse Gallery, which has become the unofficial hub for the holiday, has been hosting receptions to highlight the work of local Latino artists. EL DIA DE LOS MUERTOS CLOSING EVENTSaturday, Oct. 27 from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m.The Day of the Dead candlelight procession begins at 3 p.m. at the IceHouse Gallery (405 E. D Street). The march will continue down E. D Street toward Payran Street, and will end inside the Petaluma Fairgrounds.Interested participants are encouraged to bring electric candles and photos to honor their loved ones.The Petaluma Fairgrounds (175 Fairgrounds Drive) will host El Dia de los Muertos Petaluma, featuring food, music and family-friendly activities and entertainment. The event is free, but donations are accepted. For more information, check out "El Dia de los Muertos Petaluma" on Facebook. ...

Aug 17, 2018

Watch Iceage's Japanese Flower Art-Inspired Video for 'Under The Sun'

White Oak Music Hall Downstairs # ^ Nov. 19 – New Orleans, LA @ One Eyed Jacks # ^ Nov. 20 – Birmingham, AL @ Saturn # ^ Nov. 22 – Mexico City, CDMX @ Sala Nov. 23 – Atlanta, GA @ The Earl # ^ Nov. 24 – Atlanta, GA @ The Earl # ^ Nov. 25 – New York, NY @ Music Hall of Williamsburg Nov. 27 – New York, NY @ Elsewhere Dec. 5 – Berlin, DE @ Bi Nuu Dec. 7 – London, UK @ Hackney Arts Centre ∞ Related Hear Jillian Jacqueline and Keith Urban’s New Duet ‘If I Were You’ Review: The Beths’ ‘Future Me Hates Me’ Is a Power-Pop Monument ≠ = Shiny Darkly * = Josiah Konder # = with Black Lips ^ = with Surfbort ∞ = with Astrid Sonne and Helm In This Article: Iceage Want more Rolling Stone? Sign up for our newsletter. Show Comments a href="https://blockads.fi...

Aug 17, 2018

New York's flower district is dying a slow death as many of Manhattan's markets disappear

Louboutin and Barney's exotic bamboos or purple dancing ladies for catalog and window displays. Mendez was only 12 when he moved to New York from Mexico City. By the time he was 14, he was unloading boxes of flowers in the predawn gloom. Like the elder Rosenberg, he spoke little English, but worked hard to succeed in a physically strenuous environment."Everyone here starts from the bottom," he says.Now 30, Mendez is a naturalized citizen who has spent more than half his life working on West 28th Street. "I've learned so much here," he says, pausing to tend to a fashionably dressed customer purchasing tropical plants for a photo shoot. "New York is the only one for me," Mendez says. "If the market moves away, I'll stay here and continue working with flowers."The U.S. flower industry has shifted radically over the past two decades. Page, who has worked in the flower district since 1984, says the industry has always been volatile, ebbing and flowing with the economy. Flowers, after all, are a short-lived luxury that sell well only when people have money to burn. "Nothing has ever been as bad as the recession," Page says from an office above his Chelsea shop. "New York has always been about bling. But after the recession hit, ther...

Aug 17, 2018

Flower District is next as Manhattan's old markets vanish

Louboutin and Barney's exotic bamboos or purple dancing ladies for catalog and window displays. Mendez was only 12 when he moved to New York from Mexico City. By the time he was 14, he was unloading boxes of flowers in the predawn gloom. Like the elder Rosenberg, he spoke little English, but worked hard to succeed in a physically strenuous environment. "Everyone here starts from the bottom," he says. Now 30, Mendez is a naturalized citizen who has spent more than half his life working on West 28th Street. "I've learned so much here," he says, pausing to tend to a fashionably dressed customer purchasing tropical plants for a photo shoot. "New York is the...