Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections.

One Main Street Studio

Order flowers and gifts from One Main Street Studio located in Stow MA for a birthday, anniversary, graduation or a funeral service. The address of the flower shop is 6 Massachusetts 117, Stow Massachusetts 01775 Zip. The phone number is (978) 897-5720. We are committed to offer the most accurate information about One Main Street Studio in Stow MA. Please contact us if this listing needs to be updated. One Main Street Studio delivers fresh flowers – order today.

Business name:
One Main Street Studio
Address:
6 Massachusetts 117
City:
Stow
State:
Massachusetts
Zip Code:
01775
Phone number:
(978) 897-5720
if this is your business: ( update info) (delete this listing)
Express you love, friendship, thanks, support - or all of the above - with beautiful flowers & gifts!

Find One Main Street Studio directions to 6 Massachusetts 117 in Stow, MA (Zip 01775) on the Map. It's latitude and longitude coordinates are 42.4295069516495, -71.4769611710786 respectively.

Florists in Stow MA and Nearby Cities

77 Main St
Hudson, MA 01749
(4.38 Miles from One Main Street Studio)
20 Nixon Road
Framingham, MA 01701
(6.62 Miles from One Main Street Studio)
92 Boston Post Road
Sudbury, MA 01776
(7.19 Miles from One Main Street Studio)
89 Main St
Concord, MA 01742
(7.83 Miles from One Main Street Studio)
310 Boston Post Rd
Wayland, MA 01778
(8.27 Miles from One Main Street Studio)

Flowers and Gifts News

Aug 3, 2020

Obituary: Ann Hope Crawley - Montclair Local

Montclair YMCA, where she enjoyed a close community of Y enthusiasts.Hope was born in Morristown, N.J., and spent most of her childhood in Waterbury and Watertown, Conn. She attended Trinity Washington University (Class of 1954) in Washington, D.C., and was active in their alumni community.Hope Crawley was known for her generous hospitality — her dining room table was crowded at holidays — and her careful listening.Hope is survived by her eight children: Patricia D’Ambrosio and husband John of Andover, Mass.; Frank Crawley and wife Kries of Kessel-Lo, Belgium; Anne Mernin and husband Michael of Montclair; Michael Crawley and wife Agnes of South San Francisco, Calif.; Joseph Crawley of Montclair; Mary Lea Crawley and husband Rob Pratt of Madison, N.J.: Matthew Crawley of Charleston, S.C.; and Paul Crawley and wife Christine of Glen Rock, N.J. Hope leaves 15 grandchildren: John, Paul, Maria, Frankie, Liesbeth, Ryan, Emily, Nikki, Joseph, Kaitlyn, Henry, Hope Pratt, Alison, Taylor and Brandon and her great grandson Matthew. She is greatly missed by her dog, Ginger.Hope believed in the power of love and forgiveness. She felt blessed to live her adult life in Montclair and gratitude for the community at the Newman Center at Montclair State University, Immaculate Conception, the Montclair YMCA, the Salvation Army and St. John’s Episcopal church. She was deeply inspired by her friends on Montclair Avenue and the unending care and grace of that special neighborhood.Due to the unfortunate circumstances of COVID-19, a memorial will be planned at a future date. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the Parkinson’s Foundation.

Mar 19, 2020

From flower shops to comic book stores, some ‘non-essential’ businesses stay open during coronavirus scare - PennLive

Linda Diener, the owner of the Hummelstown flower shop said she had to stay open.“I’m a single business owner and this my only money I make,” she said.Almost all of her business is delivery with very little foot traffic and a lot of the business is over the internet from national companies.“We just leave the flowers at the door,” she said.Diener says that her store is taking precautions. They spray down everything and they have glove and hand sanitizers.On Monday Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf “strongly urged” non-essential businesses across the state to close for 14 days, starting Tuesday, to help mitigate the spread of the coronavirus.Nonessential industries include:entertainmenthospitality and recreation facilitiescommunity and recreation centersgymsyogabarre and spin facilitieshair salons and barber shopsnail salons and spascasinosconcert venuestheaterssporting event venuesgolf coursesretail facilities, including shopping malls except for pharmacy or other health care facilities within retail operationsBut on Tuesday, man...

Feb 1, 2020

Deaths for the week of Jan. 10, 2020 - The Jewish News of Northern California

He had to drop out of school to get a job, but he learned to be an expert cook, working in restaurants. When the war was over, he stowed away on a ship to Australia. He was caught but managed to slip away and live as an undocumented person under the name Johnny Corn. Finally, he turned himself in and with the help of the Jewish community avoided jail time and was able to leave for the U.S. In Los Angeles, he worked as a chef until he was drafted into the Army at Fort Ord. As a soldier, he drove the Army bus to take enlisted Jews to a synagogue in Salinas, where he met his wife, Eva, our mother. Once his enlistment was over, they married and remained in Carmel where they opened a gourmet French restaurant, Le Coq D’Or. However, his heart was in music and Jewish life, so he took Eva, who was pregnant, and their two small children to New York to study to become a Cantor. Five years later, after graduation, he spent two years as Cantor in South Bend, Indiana. Then the family moved to Palo Alto, California, where he served as Cantor at Congregation Beth Jacob in Redwood City with Rabbi Teitelbaum for over three decades. He earned a master’s degree from Stanford and an honorary doctorate from Hebrew Union College. In the ’90s, he was diagnosed with throat cancer, but after two successful surgeries, he was able to live cancer-free for many years. Sadly, his voice was greatly impacted, and he was no longer able to eat normally. Yet, in retirement, he led services for Jewish holidays on cruises. He lost Eva to lung cancer shortly after their 50th anniversary. As part of his healing process, he published his autobiography, “Risen from the Ashes, Tales of a Musical Messenger,” which aptly describes his great courage and indomitable will to survive. He married Nina, who has been by his side for 20 years. In all his years, Judaism, service to others and education have been his guiding values. Hans is preceded in death by his parents, Max and Ida Cohn, and his wife, Eva Cohn. He is survived by his second wife, Nina, and his daughters Becki Cohn-Vargas (Rito Vargas), Ruth Cohn (Michael Lewin) and Barbara Liepman (Michael Liepman), and six grandchildren. Donations can be sent in his memory to the Hans Cohn Music Fund and CBJ Cares Committee by going to the Congregation Beth Jacob website donation page at bethjacobrwc.org/donate. Shirley Lenore Daniel March 15, 1921–Dec. 16, 2019 Shirley Lenore Daniel, 98, passed away peacefully December 16, 2019, in Millbrae, CA. Shirley was born March 15, 1921, in San Francisco to Sam and Silvia Wenger and spent the majority of her life in the city she loved. She had an idyllic childhood and idolized both her parents. Shirley graduated from George Washington High School, class of 1938, just the second year after the school’s opening. Shirley was predeceased by her husband, Leslie, of 56 years. She was also predeceased by her brother, Irwin Wenger. Shirley is survived by her three sons, Bruce Daniel, Clifford Daniel (Gigi) and Sanford Daniel (Janis). Also survived by her grandchildren, Aaron and Julia Daniel. Mom was very dedicated to her family and proud of all their accomplishments. She was proud of her Jewish identity. Mom was very enthusiastic about being a native San Franciscan (born and raised), even having walked across the Golden Gate Bridge on the day it opened in 1937. Mom engaged in many activities to keep her mind sharp, including a lifelong love of playing bridge, mahjong and knitting. Services were held Dec. 20 at Home of Peace Cemetery Chapel in Colma. Contributions to San Francisco Campus for Jewish Living (formerly Jewish Home for the Aged), 302 Silver Ave., SF, CA 94112 preferred. SINAI MEMORIAL CHAPEL-SAN FRANCISCO Allen Marvin Dekelboum May 21, 1930–Dec. 7, 2019 Allen Marvin Dekelboum...

Feb 1, 2020

AAGOT KATE NORMAN ROSELLINI - Mercer Island Reporter

What a legacy to bestow! Special thanks to all the caretakers at Nov Adult Family Home and Providence Hospice for the tender care she received to the end. Kate is survived by her children: Jack (Diane) Rosellini, Sandra (Felipe) Ochoa, Taale Rosellini and Mary Ann (Bruce) Flynn. Kate was so proud of her 11 grandchildren: Alejandra,Jacquie, Ana Maria, Pilar, Yvonne, Monica, John, Michael, Ryan, Jason, and Erik. Kate was also blessed with a growing number, “21”, of great-grandchildren. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in her memory to the Kate Norman Rosellini & Leo John Rosellini, M.D., Endowed Scholarship in Nursing at the University of Washington http://tiny.cc/ROSNUR Kate’s family and friends look forward to celebrating her life at a later date. -- -- ...

Feb 1, 2020

6 Plants and Flowers Native to Florida That You May Not Know About - Florida Insider

Jamaica, Bahamas and other areas all over the Caribbean and Asia. The Porter Weed gets its name from medicinal properties bestowed upon them in the Caribbean and in Florida. Some of South Florida’s native plants may not be as striking as some of their more exotic counterparts. However, some do possess attractive foliage, colorful fruits, or add a pleasing form or texture to the landscape. South Florida has a wide variety of native plants that are both attractive and useful as landscape plants. 4. Marlberry Marlberry (Ardisia escallonioides) in Pine Island Ridge Natural Area, Davie, Florida, USA. Photo Credit: Holly Guerrio/Shutterstock.com The Marlberry (ardisia escallonioides) is actually a fast-growing, evergreen small tree or shrub with dark green foliage. Clusters of small cream-colored flowers make this plant an attractive sight to behold. The plant also provides fruits for birds. It grows about 10-15 ft. tall, although it can get as tall as 20 ft. They can be planted with other flowers and plants in the same space, creating a beautiful, scenic view of a garden or front yard. Their multiple trunks can stand out when trained well into a small tree and can be lighted at night, creating a magnificent display. 5. Jamaican caper Another interesting flower native to our sunny Florida (Miami) is the Jamaican caper (capparis cynophallophora). Jamaica caper flowers are quite showy, with two-inch-long purple stamens and white anthers and white petals. The evergreen, glossy leaves of this small shrub are folded together when they first open up to give the plant a bonze appearance. They can be trained into small plants as well, working well in soils with good drainage. Jamaican caper flower. Photo Credit: www.ebay.com/ 6. Bougainvillea Showy ornamental bracted carmine pink blooms of magnificent weeping colorful bougainvillea. Photo Credit: alybaba/Shutterstock.com The bougainvillea (Nyctaginaceae) is a popular, pretty-flowered plant here in warm Miami, Florida. Indeed, it is a popular ornamental plant that can be seen hung as a decoration in many south Floridian homes and gardens. Although native to South America (“buganvilea” in Portuguese and “buganvilla” in Spanish is representative of the languages spoken in this continent’s countries), bougainvillea is very populous here in Miami. Almost any and every house along the streets of Miami can have a garden full of bougainvillea and are probably the pride and joy of every abuelita. The fact that it’s a drought-tolerant plant helps it survive the harsh Miami summer months, making it the perfect hot season plant. Its long, arching thorny branches bear heart-shaped leaves and masses of papery bracts in white, pink, orange, purple and burgundy (oh, pretty colors)! All of these flowers will add a beautiful exotic ...

Jan 4, 2020

How a Hawthorne woman's floral creations made it to the White House and the pope - NorthJersey.com

Charlie Miller, bought a farm in Ridgefield Springs, New York, a village 14 miles north of Cooperstown, in 1972. Soil at the 33-acre farm was rich in organic fertilizer, though Miller calls it something else. "The ground had so much cow manure that everything I planted came up gorgeous," Miller said. "I ended up doing five huge gardens." Miller wound up with a multitude of flowers, and at first she did not know what to do with them. "I just sat in the barn, and I said: 'What a waste. All of these flowers are going to die. Can't I try to make their life a little longer?' " Miller recalled. She tried different methods to dry her flowers, finding that some, such as cockscomb, could be dried out simply by hanging them upside-down.

Disclaimer

All trademarks, service marks, trade names, trade dress, product names and logos appearing on the site are the property of their respective owners, including One Main Street Studio florist on this page.