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Florists in Bypro, KY

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Bypro KY News

Mar 15, 2019

Surprise Eviction Notices Have This Old Plantation Community Up In… - Honolulu Civil Beat

Dela Cruz, a 45-year-old former Honolulu City Council member who now chairs the Senate Ways and Means Committee, said the uproar is a natural byproduct of progress. He said the state has a goal of preserving agricultural land and developing the industry, and he is leading the effort. Sen. Donovan Dela Cruz, pictured here in 2014, has secured millions of dollars for the state’s Agribusiness Development Corp. to buy agricultural land in central Oahu.PF Bentley/Civil Beat Dela Cruz has made no secret of his strategy of buying up land. Conceptual plans for the Whitmore Project are on his Senate webpage. He says he presented the project to the neighborhood board in 2013. The next year, he talked to Civil Beat extensively about what he was doing. "In regard to the mechanics of ADC and what's going on, that's growing pains," he said. "It's a positive thing: it means something is going on." The ADC's Whitmore Project calls for turning what's now largely fallow farmland and old buildings into a hub for diversified agriculture, including packaging and processing facilities, a warehouse, workforce housing and thousands of acres of land. The corporation soon will own some 4,000 acres of farm land in Central Oahu, says Dela Cruz. It's a big change for a once-sleepy agency. Established by the Legislature in 1994, the ADC was set up to capitalize on the decline of Oahu's sugar and pineapple plantations, which presented the state "an unprecedented opportunity for the conversion of agriculture into a dynamic growth industry." To carry out that mission, lawmakers gave the corporation broad powers, including the authority to buy, own and develop land. The agency was mostly dormant for much of its history, but has recently gone on a buying spree. Over the last five years alone, state budget information shows, the Legislature has appropriated more than a quarter of a billion dollars to the ADC, inc...

Oct 26, 2018

Surprise Eviction Notices Have This Old Plantation Community Up In Arms

Dela Cruz, a 45-year-old former Honolulu City Council member who now chairs the Senate Ways and Means Committee, said the uproar is a natural byproduct of progress. He said the state has a goal of preserving agricultural land and developing the industry, and he is leading the effort. Sen. Donovan Dela Cruz, pictured here in 2014, has secured millions of dollars for the state’s Agribusiness Development Corp. to buy agricultural land in central Oahu.PF Bentley/Civil Beat Dela Cruz has made no secret of his strategy of buying up land. Conceptual plans for the Whitmore Project are on his Senate webpage. He says he presented the project to the neighborhood board in 2013. The next year, he talked to Civil Beat extensively about what he was doing. "In regard to the mechanics of ADC and what's going on, that's growing pains," he said. "It's a positive thing: it means something is going on." The ADC's Whitmore Project calls for turning what's now largely fallow farmland and old buildings into a hub for diversified agriculture, including packaging and processing facilities, a warehouse, workforce housing and thousands of acres of land. The corporation soon will own some 4,000 acres of farm land in Central Oahu, says Dela Cruz. It's a big change for a once-sleepy agency. Established by the Legislature in 1994, the ADC was set up to capitalize on the decline of Oahu's sugar and pineapple plantations, which presented the state "an unprecedented opportunity for the conversion of agriculture into a dynamic growth industry." To carry out that mission, lawmakers gave the corporation broad powers, including the authority to buy, own and develop land. The agency was mostly dormant for much of its history, but has recently gone on a buying spree. Over the last five years alone, state budget information shows, the Legislature has appropriated more than a quarter of a billion dollars to the ADC, inc...

Jul 6, 2018

In Bloom: What to know before you go to Raleigh's Dix Park sunflower field

Neuse River Resource Recovery Facility, one of the city's wastewater treatment plant. Biosolids, a stabilized sludge, are a byproduct of the wastewater treatment process and used as fertilizer on the sunflower fields. The sunflowers were planted to keep the nitrogen-rich soil from washing into the streams and rivers in the watershed. Despite city warnings (and the fact that the fields were sprayed with a byproduct of the wastewater treatment plant), hundreds of sunflower seekers jumped the fence to get a closer look at the flowers. The rural location also wasn't set up to handle the hundreds of people who came out daily to see them. So, this year, the city planted soybeans in the original sunflower field - and moved the flowers to Dix Park. You can find them off Hunt Drive near its intersection with Western Boulevard. Here's what you'll need to know if you go see Raleigh's sunflower field Is there admission? The sunflowers are free to see. The fields are open daily. What's the deal with parking? You can find the sunflowers off Hunt Drive very close to the soccer fields that are right near Hunt's intersection with Western Boulevard and across the street from Central Prison. You can park in the soccer field parking area during weekdays. On weeknights and weekends, designated parking lots with green striping will be available for public use. Is it a long walk? The field is a very short walk from the parking lot. The entrance is at the far end of the parking lot. Be prepared to walk along a rocky, unpaved path and grass. A jogging stroller might be easiest to use here - but any would probably work. How close can I get to the flowers? Really close. It's OK to walk among the flowers. In fact, the city has put some paths through the field so that you can really walk among the sunflowers. More details ... There are a lot of bees. This is, after all, a field of sunflowers. So just ...

Jul 6, 2018

Nature Journal: A look inside the mountain laurel flower

Beauty, as we perceive it, is a byproduct of this essential process. Form follows function. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. And so on. At the core of this process is the pollen produced on the anthers of a flower's stamens, the male parts of the plant. In order to achieve fertilization, pollen must be transferred from the stamens to the female part, the pistil, of the same or another flower. More: Tommy the tortoise called Asheville home for 22 years. Now, he needs your help In our temperate zone, hummingbirds and small mammals might assist in this regard, but the exchange is most often accomplished via the wind or by insects. The beautiful and highly individual sculpturing of a pollen grain's outer wall is a unique feature of each plant species - so much so, in fact, that scientists have been able to determine the presence or abundance of various species over time in specific place by separating pollen from cores of peat extracted from acidic bogs. The specific configuration of the pollen grains for many plants can be observed with a hand magnifier. You will be looking directly at one of the most beautiful and functional aspects of the natural world, and in the process you might be able to determine the manner in which the pollen grains are distributed. More: Nature Journal: Goldfinches soar with the grace of ballet dancers More: Nature Journal: How do crickets make that chirping sound? The familiar mountain laurel (Kalmia latiflora) is a case study in this regard. Almost a century ago, Herbert Waldron Faulkner provided an account in his "Mysteries of the Flowers" (Stokes, 1917). I have inserted some asides in brackets: "Each corolla [cluster of petals] is provided with a ring of twelve small po...

Apr 7, 2017

Fruition Seeds focuses on locally adapted food and flowers

Page-Mann says. So Fruition developed a flower variety that has more than 100 petals per head.In the seed-saving business, food is the byproduct, so when Fruition found itself with 7,000 pounds of certified organic winter squash a few years ago, they connected with Foodlink, whose workers followed a protocol for harvesting the seeds and kept the food for their operation."When farmers are no longer seed savers, it's like a fundamental part of democracy is missing," Page-Mann says. "It's like saying, 'Well, we really don't have to vote.' It's a tremendous right; to know and make choices."The practice of saving seeds goes deep into human history — about 10,000 years, Page-Mann says. And for the vast majority of that time, we had no idea what genetics were; it wasn't until about 60 years ago that we even understood what DNA was. So seed-saving was based off of the appearance and taste of the plants.For 2,000 years we were keen observers, she says, but today we aren't so adept at pattern recognition.The basic process of refining a variety involves "roguing" or killing the plants that are not demonstrating the desired qualities, thereby eliminating those traits from the genetic pool."When I hear people say 'I love to garden, but I tend to kill plants,' I giggle to myself, because I kill tens of thousands of plants every year very intentionally," she says.This involves an understanding of phenotypical, or observable traits and unexpressed traits, and how they are linked. There are certain indicators Page-Mann has learned to identify, like the specific curl of a zucchini leaf that means the plant is susceptible to a kind of mildew. Because she knows these traits are linked, she'll rogue those plants early, before they start dying or passing their genes along.Fruition also develops new varieties of plants through hybridization, which involves taking two carefully selected, inbred parent lines and manually crossing them, and then securing them with airtight bags to keep airborne pollen and bees out."By the time 50 years have passed, they'll be beloved heirlooms for our grandchildren," Page-Mann says. "We think of seeds as books. It's important that we have 500-year-old books and five-year-old books, but it's also important that we continue to write new books constantly."... (Rochester City Newspaper)

Mar 16, 2017

Commentary: Public gardens grow the economy in Philadelphia area

Join me in applauding our public gardens for their growing and lasting impact on our region.Matt Rader is president of the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society.president@pennhort.orgTo view the complete study, visit: click here.More CoveragePublished: March 16, 2017 — 9:04 PM EDT The Philadelphia Inquirer Do you have a minute?...Over the past year, the Inquirer, the Daily News and Philly.com have uncovered corruption in local and state public offices, shed light on hidden and dangerous environmental risks, and deeply examined the region’s growing heroin epidemic. This is indispensable journalism, brought to you by the largest, most experienced newsroom in the region. Fact-based journalism of this caliber isn’t cheap. We need your support to keep our talented reporters, editors and photographers holding government accountable, looking out for the public interest, and separating fact from fiction. If you already subscribe, thank you. If not, please consider doing so by clicking on the button below. Subscriptions can be home delivered in print, or digitally read on nearly any mobile device or computer, and start as low as 25¢ per day.We're thankful for your support in every way.]] ]] Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. (Philly.com)