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Originals By Design

Order flowers and gifts from Originals By Design located in Le Mars IA for a birthday, anniversary, graduation or a funeral service. The address of the flower shop is 200 Plymouth St Se, Le Mars Iowa 51031 Zip. The phone number is (712) 546-1555. We are committed to offer the most accurate information about Originals By Design in Le Mars IA. Please contact us if this listing needs to be updated. Originals By Design delivers fresh flowers – order today.

Business name:
Originals By Design
Address:
200 Plymouth St Se
City:
Le Mars
State:
Iowa
Zip Code:
51031
Phone number:
(712) 546-1555
if this is your business: ( update info) (delete this listing)
Express you love, friendship, thanks, support - or all of the above - with beautiful flowers & gifts!

Find Originals By Design directions to 200 Plymouth St Se in Le Mars, IA (Zip 51031) on the Map. It's latitude and longitude coordinates are 42.79307, -96.163429 respectively.

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Flowers and Gifts News

Apr 13, 2017

Annual Flower Show in Davidsonville advocates for self-sufficient ...

One section of the complex, managed by Kyle Marsh, is filled with composting equipment, grow lamps, indoor growing containers and canvas grow-sheds.Riddle said, "My dad, Don Riddle, came up with the idea for the Flower Show. He was inspired by garden centers and flower shows elsewhere. This spring preview is all about inspiration and getting people excited about the season."To evoke the moods of various eras in the Main Street vignettes, unique props from the past were utilized.One of the Riddle family's old pickup trucks, restored to mint condition, was on display, laden with flowers reminiscent of pre-World War II Maryland. It is a shiny 1939 Ford with 302 horsepower under the hood and sharp-looking sideboards. Across the street from the truck is a "Victory Garden," circa 1930. On the facade of a set built to resemble a house front is a series of old posters from that era.Further down, a yard is decorated with pink flamingos. A fishnet-wearing leg lamp, similar to the one central to the 1983 movie "A Christmas Story" about a family in the early 1940s, is visible through a window. On the grass, flowering plants spilled from a red Radio Flyer wagon.Further down the street, is a current day scene. Nearby, is a vignette advocating for "pollinator gardens," brimming with plants friendly to pollinating creatures including bees, varieties of butterflies, bats and hummingbirds."Instead of mulch," Powers said, "plant greens that are sustainable." He said Homestead had recently taken down some of its older greenhouses and had put a cover crop on the exposed soil to avoid water runoff out in its fields. Shortly, the staff will be planting a large, demonstration pollinator garden where the greenhouses once stood.Powers pointed out the distance from the sustainable farming utilized by the fictitious 1910 farmer to the future tiny house resident growing a vegetable garden and enjoying a self-sufficient lifestyle was not too far or radical."The more things change, the more they stay the same."For more informationFor details about Flower Show classes, workshops and more, visit www.homesteadgardens.com. (CapitalGazette.com)

Apr 7, 2017

The later date of this year's Maine Flower Show means more and different flowers on display

Estabrook said his company is growing thousands of plants for the show, both for its own displays and those of other landscapers and nurseries. While Marstaller is focused on annuals, vegetables and herbs, Estabrook’s is growing the whole gamut.The later date of the flower show also answers another complaint that show-goers have had in past years: the lack of plants for sale. This year, attendees will be able to buy plants.“You could plant some of them outside in the first week of April,” Pierson said, referring to perennials, as well as to the 300 trees and shrubs now growing in his own wholesale company greenhouses for the show. Barring a late-season snowstorm or cold snap, the ground in southern Maine, at least, is often workable and temperatures warm enough then for planting.Pierson’s own booth will be selling a line of small native plants that are ready to go in the ground. Estabrook’s booth, too, will offer a variety of ready-to-plant items, include pansies, ranunculus, hellebores and small shrubs such as magnolias.Both Marstaller and Pierson will have display gardens at the show, among the 16 display gardens in total. Pierson said his company is creating a display garden for the first time since it closed its landscape-design division more than 20 years ago. As MELNA president, he wants to support the show. But there’s another reason, too.“I’m trying to help the home owner understand they can buy plants that are locally grown, that are tested by local growers in this climate, and those growers are employing their neighbors,” Pierson said.He said that Maine’s nursery industry has not done a good job of communicating to the public that the buy-local movement consumers have embraced for fruits and vegetables also applies to ornamental plants.The theme of this year’s flower show is “Plant Something,” in coordination with the association’s marketing campaign, itself part of a national campaign that encourages people to garden and promotes “the environmental, financial and health benefits of trees and plants.”What happens to the display plants once the five-day show ends? The perennials, trees and shrubs whose growth is being sped up in greenhouses will live after the show – although some will need as much as a year to recover from the stress. Most of the annuals, however, will not be saved.And while three local nurseries are producing most of the plants before the show, Estabrook hopes attendees will take up the task after. To increase the odds of that, they can take home free seeds for pollinator-friendly varieties. Information on how to grow the seeds will be posted to the flower show website.Later this summer, whenever they see butterflies and bees hovering around the plants those seedlings produce in their own gardens, flower show attendees can remember the flower show. It will provide some pleasure in the moment as well as advertising for next year’s show.Tom Atwell is a freelance writer gardening in Cape Elizabeth. He can be contacted at 767-2297 or at: [email protected]... (Press Herald)

Mar 23, 2017

Annual Flower Show in Davidsonville advocates for self-sufficient living

One section of the complex, managed by Kyle Marsh, is filled with composting equipment, grow lamps, indoor growing containers and canvas grow-sheds.Riddle said, "My dad, Don Riddle, came up with the idea for the Flower Show. He was inspired by garden centers and flower shows elsewhere. This spring preview is all about inspiration and getting people excited about the season."To evoke the moods of various eras in the Main Street vignettes, unique props from the past were utilized.One of the Riddle family's old pickup trucks, restored to mint condition, was on display, laden with flowers reminiscent of pre-World War II Maryland. It is a shiny 1939 Ford with 302 horsepower under the hood and sharp-looking sideboards. Across the street from the truck is a "Victory Garden," circa 1930. On the facade of a set built to resemble a house front is a series of old posters from that era.Further down, a yard is decorated with pink flamingos. A fishnet-wearing leg lamp, similar to the one central to the 1983 movie "A Christmas Story" about a family in the early 1940s, is visible through a window. On the grass, flowering plants spilled from a red Radio Flyer wagon.Further down the street, is a current day scene. Nearby, is a vignette advocating for "pollinator gardens," brimming with plants friendly to pollinating creatures including bees, varieties of butterflies, bats and hummingbirds."Instead of mulch," Powers said, "plant greens that are sustainable." He said Homestead had recently taken down some of its older greenhouses and had put a cover crop on the exposed soil to avoid water runoff out in its fields. Shortly, the staff will be planting a large, demonstration pollinator garden where the greenhouses once stood.Powers pointed out the distance from the sustainable farming utilized by the fictitious 1910 farmer to the future tiny house resident growing a vegetable garden and enjoying a self-sufficient lifestyle was not too far or radical."The more things change, the more they stay the same."For more informationFor details about Flower Show classes, workshops and more, visit www.homesteadgardens.com. (CapitalGazette.com)

Jan 5, 2017

Floyd Valley Federated Garden Club

The FV Federated Garden Club meets the second Tuesday of the month in the dining room of the Presbyterian United Church of Christ, 858 7th Ave. S.E. Le Mars. Meetings usually begin at 7:00 p.m. There is always an interesting program. Refreshments, too! Annual dues are $12.00. Speaking of interesting programs, the January 10th meeting will feature a program called “Stepping into our Garden & Floral Decorating with Antiques.” The presenter will be Craig Hintze of LeBloom Floral & Antiques. The meeting will begin at 6:00 p.m. and take place at LeBloom Floral & Antiques, 18 Central Ave. N.E. in downtown Le Mars. The FV Federated Garden Club completes several service projects each year including planting a tree in observance of Arbor Day. Over the years, club members have planted trees in various locations throughout Plymouth County. Each May the club holds a sale of “tried and tested” plants from their own gardens. The club is responsible for the Plymouth County “The Best Five Days of Summer” Fair Open Class Horticulture, Food and Preservative Exhibit. A new event, a pie baking contest, was held during the 2016 Fair. Decorating a Christmas tree for several years at the annual Pioneer Village Christmas Tree display is also among the club’s many projects. The club’s 2017 study plant is the Elephant Ear Colocasia that belongs to the araceae family whose members are Aroids. Each member will plant an Elephant Ear and comparisons of the plant will be made at the end of the growing season. When members of FVFGC were rec... (Akron Hometowner)

Dec 15, 2016

Ereck Flowers on decoding his tweets, being Optimus Prime and 'scary' Odell

Me and him are kind of in the same boat, we came in together, we’re just looking to get better, find our way in the league. Q: Offensive tackle Marshall Newhouse. A: Smart player. He comes in works hard every day, man. It’s gonna be fun playing next to him this game. Q: How would you describe your on-field mentality? A: Whatever it takes to win. You try to go out there and be as competitive as you can be out there. Giants running back Rashad Jennings holds back an upset Ereck Flowers durin... (New York Post)

Jun 22, 2016

What the Giants' interest in Eugene Monroe means for Ereck Flowers

Giants should be thinking along the same lines. However, the Giants don't have much in reserve, and their confidence in returning right tackle Marshall Newhouse isn't ultra-high. So while it's nice to get younger and healthier in theory, they could decide that the need to keep Eli Manning upright requires adding a veteran like Monroe for a year while Flowers and other young linemen continue to develop. If nothing else, they could sign him just to bring him to camp, see how healthy he is and add him to the competition for playing time on the line. In the end, Flowers is the Giants' left tackle of the future. And it's possible that, even if they did sign Monroe, they could play him on the right side and leave Flowers on the left. But they're open to options because they know they don't have a perfect solution on the line right now. So keep an eye out for Monroe, and if he signs elsewhere, know the Giants aren't ruling out adding someone from the outside to the mix. (ESPN (blog))

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