Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Ames, IA

Find local Ames, Iowa florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Ames and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Ames Flower Shops

Ames Greenhouse Floral Ia

3011 South Duff Street
Ames, IA 50010
(515) 232-1332

Coe's Campus Floral & Gifts

2619 Northridge Pkwy
Ames, IA 50010
(515) 292-5432

Holub Garden And Greenhouses Inc

22085 580Th Avenue
Ames, IA 50010
(515) 232-4769

Hy-Vee Floral Shop

640 Lincoln Way
Ames, IA 50010
(515) 232-1407

Mary Kay's Flowers & Gifts

3134 Northwood Dr
Ames, IA 50010
(515) 232-3993

Ames IA News

Aug 3, 2020

Willie Beaty, Sr. | Obituary | Valdosta Daily Times - Valdosta Daily Times

Roosevelt Beaty and Sarah Ruth Beaty, both of whom preceded him in death. He attended the public schools in Valdosta, GA, and St. James Missionary Baptist Church. He enjoyed singing in both the Senior Choir and the Men's Choir, and was a soloist on a few songs. In 1951, he married Mamie L. Drayton. They had two children, Debra and Willie, Jr. The marriage ended in divorce after thirty years. Mr. Beaty later married Lillian Roberson, also of Valdosta, GA, who preceded him in death. Mr. Beaty was a proud WWII veteran who served his country abroad in the United States Army Air Corps, which later became the Air Force. Upon returning to Valdosta after his military service, he earned a Certificate/Diploma in Brick Masonry from Valdosta Technical School. He went on to become a licensed brick mason contractor building many residential and commercial buildings in Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina. Some of his work included St. James Missionary Baptist Church in Valdosta, GA and the Marine barracks in Paris Island, SC, where he worked as a subcontractor. He trained and mentored many young men who went on to start their own businesses. Mr. Beaty was proud of the fact that he saved his money for years, and upon marrying his first wife, Mamie, he paid cash for their new home on Lake Park Rd in 1951. This shaped his theory on home ownership which was, "if you are paying on it, you don't own it... the bank does!" He spent the last 16 years of his life with his two children and their families in Northern Virginia. He joined Heritage Fellowship Church in Reston, VA. He enjoyed reading his Bible every day; going to church; shooting pool; vacationing with his family in Georgia; Florida; and the Caribbean; going to the Senior Center three times a week; and most of all, going out for ice cream! Mr. Beaty is survived by his daughter and son-in-law, Debra and Rochester Murphy of Great Falls, VA; his son, Willie E. Beaty, Jr., and hi...

Aug 3, 2020

Mansfield woman enjoys cactus blooms, if only for one night a year - Mansfield News Journal

The flowers are short-lived, and some of these species, such as Selenicereus grandiflorus, bloom only once a year, for a single night.Other names for one or more cacti with this habit are princess of the night, Honolulu queen, Christ in the manger and queen of the night.This has been a banner year for Theisen's night-blooming cereus. "I have had blooms before, maybe two, three, four or five," she said. "For it to have 24, it's unusual to see."The delicate white flowers can be eight inches across. Theisen saw seven blooms of Tuesday night.On Wednesday, she invited some people over for a little get-together. They celebrated the occasion with champagne.Theisen estimates the plant is at least 30 years old. "I more or less inherited this from my mom," she said. "It requires very little care. All you have to do is occasionally water it. It's obviously loving where it's at."Theisen turned off Christmas music and sat in a chair to tell a reporter about her night-blooming cereus. Her Bichon Frise, named Lilly, joined her, squeezing into the chair with her small frame.Lacking prickly spines, the night-blooming cereus doesn't look like a typical cactus. "During the year, it's not a big deal," Theisen said. "I water it and let it go. When the latter part of June or July comes around, that's when you start seeing the blooms that will develop."I start watching."Theisen says she loves flowers and is fortunate that one of her four adult children owns a nursery."Being here, you're not allowed to plant flowers outside," Theisen said of her condominium complex on the far south side o...

Aug 3, 2020

Flower Power: The Benefits of 6 Key Floral Extracts in Skin Care - NewBeauty Magazine

INCI name (International Nomenclature of Cosmetic Ingredients), which aligns with the Latin or scientific name. More than 28,000 INCI names, published by the Personal Care Products Council, have been developed by the INCI Committee with participation by the FDA. Beauty BloomsOne flower is not more beneficial than another for the skin, says Fresh cofounder Alina Roytberg. “Different flowers provide different benefits that address skin’s varying needs.” From petal to stem, these six flowers bear complexion- pe...

Aug 3, 2020

Daisies bring a sunny look to the garden - Sumter Item

SO MANY FLOWERS WITH "DAISY" IN THEIR NAMES Nowadays, we gardeners use the word "daisy" to represent many different flowers in the daisy family. In the chrysanthemum genus, for example, there's the ox-eye daisy (C. leucanthemum), its white petals encircling a clear yellow disc. It's a familiar roadside plant. This plant, like the English daisy, was a native of Europe, but has firmly established itself in America (many consider it a weed). Other perennial chrysanthemum daisies include the Nippon daisy (C. nipponicum), also with white petals, and the painted daisy (C. coccineum), whose red, pink or white flowers begin their show in early summer. The high, or giant daisy (C. uliginosum) is aptly named, because its white flowers tower 4 to 7 feet above the ground. The crown, or garland daisy (C. coronarium) is an annual species, with yellow or white flowers atop 3-foot stalks. The Erigeron genus and the aster genus also have some "daisies;" the former sometimes are called fleabanes, for their alleged ability to drive away fleas, and the latter sometimes are called Michaelmas daisies. Whereas the fleabanes generally bloom in spring and early summer, the asters bloom from late summer into fall. Two representatives of Erigeron that are good garden daisies are the orange daisy (E. aurantiacus) and the seaside, or double-orange daisy (E. glaucus). The list goes on, including the perennial globe daisy (Globularia trichosantha), a low-growing native of Asia producing a globular, blue flower; the Swan River daisy (Brachycome iberidifolia), a graceful little annual with blue, rose or white flowers; and the blue daisy (Agatheae coelestris), a plant best suited for greenhouse-growing, with sky-blue petals surrounding a yellow eye. Next spring, I will plant a sweep of pastel landscape with African daisies (Arctotis grandis), whose petals, white skyward over lavender undersides, surround steel-blue centers. In contrast, individual attention is demanded from each flower of Transvaal daisies (Gerbera jamesonii), which blossom in shades of salmon, pink and apricot in clay pots on my terrace. A green thumb isn't required to enjoy daisies. Most are hardy plants, free from pests, and able to tolerate poor, dry soils. If daisies have captured your fancy, sow seeds of perennial forms now. Sow seeds of annual daisies next spring. Daisies are adaptable plants that can bring their sunny disposition to the formal garden, cottage garden, meadow or abandoned lot. After all, the name daisy comes from a reference to the sun, "day's eye." Lee Reich writes regularly about gardening for The Associated Press. He has authored a number of books, including "The Ever Curious Gardener" and "The Pruning Book." He blogs at http://www.leereich.com/blog. He can be reached at garden@leereich.com. ...

Jun 19, 2020

Purple Heart Recipient, Summit High Grad George Colley Dies, 92 - Summit, NJ Patch

Purple Heart Medal for his service, passed away on June 1. Colley was born on Christmas of 1927 in Ludowici, Ga., to James Colley and Rubye Colley Baker. George attended school in Ludowici before moving to Summit to live with family. George graduated from Summit High School in 1947 and entered the U.S. Army. Following Basic Training, PFC Colley was assigned to the 23rd Infantry Regiment, in the 2nd Infantry Division, with duty in the Republic of Korea. According to 2nd Infantry reports from January 1952, PFC Colley's unit was one of four regiments designated to defend the Missouri Line in the area known as the "Iron Triangle." A report goes on to list 1,605 "negro personnel" assigned to the division during this time, with Colley being one of 118 soldiers awarded the Bronze Star Medal for Heroic Achievement in a Combat Zone. On Jan. 2, 1952, Colley received the prestigious Purple Heart Medal, for wounds sustained due to artillery attack. Colley's awards also include the Korean Service Medal, the United Nations Medal, the Army Service Ribbon, the Good Conduct Ribbon, and the Combat Infantry Badge. After his service in the Army, George began a career as a civil serv...

Jun 19, 2020

Evening Primroses: Watch the Magic - Columbia Star

At dusk one single creamy yellow blossom starts the magic show in gardens growing the common evening primrose (Oenothera biennis) and the Tina James Magic Primrose (Oneothera glazioviana). Gardeners observe how the buds on the four-petaled flowers quiver and swell, the sepals peel back, and in a blink petals unfurl wide open like a fairy umbrella. Common evening primrose flowers are 2” in diameter and ‘Tina James’ flowers are 4” wide. These green background plants by day transform into lemon yellow princesses at night as they stage and star in evening garden parties aka primrose parties drawing revelers and nocturnal pollinators like humming-bird moths. Hundreds of flowers can open in a 30-minute period. Each flower lasts only one night and closes by mid-morning the next day. The 4-H Children’s Garden at the Michigan State University in Lansing, Michigan has featured a program called “Moonlight Magic’ where guests gather to watch the primroses bloom. Children can be heard making testable inferences like “the smaller flowers seem to open first” and “the flowers higher on the stem are slower to open.” Adults start counting blossoms and predicting which will open next. Swedish University in Uppsala is studying the evolution of Oenothera biennis defense in response to herbiv...