Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Kula, HI

Find local Kula, Hawaii florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Kula and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Kula Flower Shops

Kula HI News

Oct 26, 2018

Tropical Gardening: Protea flowers are a rare treat from Down Under

Experiment Station. When Parvin became director in 1968, he was highly impressed with the obvious superior growth of Proteas that were planted at the Kula station three years earlier. As he was familiar with Proteas being grown in California, he was inspired to explore the potential of a Protea industry in Hawaii. This industry has indeed developed and continues to grow. With partial funding for Protea research coming from the Governor's Agricultural Coordinating Committee, several College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources researchers have been able to solve some of this young industry's problems and help improve production and handling. Parvin worked on the management aspects of the crop, such as the selection of superior cultivars, propagation, density spacing, pruning and plant nutrition. I-Pai Wu, a professor of agricultural engineering, developed drip irrigation systems to meet water requirements in the field and make better use of available water resources. John Cho, Stephen Ferreira and Norman Nagata, plant pathologists, examined fungicides for the control of root rot, a disease problem in Protea production. Ronald Mau and Arnold Hara, entomologists, helped solve some of the pest problems, including those that could lead to the rejection of shipments to other areas. Philip Ito, a Hilo-based horticulturist, worked on new types of Protea for the world market. Robert Paull, a plant physiologist, solved problems arising during shipping and ways to extend Protea shelf life. Of course, all these efforts became meaningful because of key Protea growers, who developed a good marketing system and took research to action. So, you see the intriguing Protea blossoms on display in homes and places of business such as hotels didn't just happen. They are the result of concerted efforts by Hawa...

Oct 26, 2018

Protea flowers a rare treat from down under

G When Parvin first became director in 1968, he was highly impressed with the obvious superior growth of proteas that had been planted at the Kula station three years earlier. As he was familiar with proteas being grown in California, he was inspired to explore the potential of a protea industry in Hawaii. This industry has indeed developed and continues to grow with partial funding for protea research coming from the Governor's Agricultural Coordinating Committee, several College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources researchers have been able to solve some of this young industry's problems and help improve production and handling. Dr. Parvin worked on the management aspects of the crop, such as the selection of superior cultivars, propagation, density spacing, pruning, and plant nutrition. Dr. I-Pai Wu, a professor of agricultural engineering, developed drip irrigation systems to meet water requirements in the field and to make better use of available water resources. John Cho, Stephen Ferreira, and Norman Nagata, plant pathologists, examined fungicides for the control of root rot, a disease problem in protea production. Ronald Mau and Arnold Hara, entomologists, helped to solve some of the pest problems, including those that could lead to the rejection of shipments to other areas. Dr. Philip Ito, a Hilo based horticulturist, worked on new types of protea for the world market. Dr. Robert Paull, a plant physiologist, solved problems arising during shipping and ways to extend protea shelf life. Of course, all these efforts became meaningful because of key protea growers who developed a good marketing system and took research to action. So you see that the intriguing protea blossoms on display in homes and places of business such as hotels didn't just happen. They are the res...

Sep 10, 2018

Maui Obituary Notices: Week of August 12, 2018

St. Joseph's Church Cemetery.Patricia VenturaPatricia VenturaMarch 16, 1944 – August 8, 2018 SPONSORED VIDEO Patricia Marie Ventura, 74 of Kula, passed away at her home on Wednesday, August 8th, 2018. She was born on March 17th,1944 in Puunene and raised in Kailua, Maui. Patricia is remembered for working many years at Liberty House and later retired from Macy's. Her hobbies included gardening, crafting, traveling and classic cars. It was her and her husbands love for classic cars that inspired them to become the founders and Presidents of the Maui Classic Cruisers Car Club over 40 years ago.She is survived by her loving husband of 55 years, Kenneth Ventura; daughter, Desiree Ventura Jackman (Michael), numerous aunties and uncles, nieces and nephews and many God children. She is also predeceased by her daughter, Dawnette Ventura-Paxton and mother, Mary "Meta" Emmsley.Visitation will be held at Norman's Mortuary on Friday, August 17, 2018 from 6:00 p.m.to 9:00 p.m. with prayer service to begin at 8:00 pm.Services will continue at Holy Ghost Church in Kula on Saturday, August 18, 2018 from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. with Mass to begin at 12:00 p.m.Gavilan Kepa’aGavilan Kepa’aFebruary 13, 1949 – August 6, 2018Gavilan "Gavi" N. Kepa'a was a beloved husband, father, brother, and friend. He passed away on August 6, 2018 at Maui Memorial Medical Center. He was born on February 13, 1949 in Honolulu to parents William Kepa'a and Clara Olival Kepa'a. Gavi resided on Hawai'i Island for much of his youth until graduating from Honoka'a High School. Upon graduation, Gavi was drafted into the U.S. Navy and received orders for Vietnam. He served in the Vietnam War as part of special forces with MACVSOG. After the war, Gavi lived on O'ahu until 1998, and then moved to Maui where he lived the remainder of his life. Gavi is survived by wife Chris...

May 7, 2017

Orchids make classy Mother's Day gifts

Such conditions occur naturally in Volcano, Waimea and upper Kona, Kula on Maui, Kalae on Molokai, Pupukea on Oahu, Waimea on Kauai, and other areas, mostly above 1,500 feet elevation, around the state.The species and hybrids of miniature cymbidiums require basically the same growing conditions as the larger conventional types. A major cultural difference is that most of the miniatures do not require temperatures nearly so cool as their larger relatives. The preferred temperature range for “minis” is 70 to 80 degrees during the day followed by a 10-degree drop at night, a condition much easier to achieve in Hawaii’s lowland areas than that required by the conventional types.To grow most orchid species, here are some hints:• Most orchids require partial shade for best growth. A good rule to follow is to give the plants all the light they can stand without scorching. Excessive shade will result in lush, dark green foliage and few flowers. Too much light may produce scorched spots on the foliage. This means shade is needed immediately. Saran, lath or trees, may be used for overhead shade.• Many cattleya, epidendrum, oncidium and vanda species will tolerate temperatures down to 45 degrees, if in a sheltered location. But most orchids prefer minimum night temperatures of 55-60 degrees. In Hawaii, there really is no maximum temperature for orchids if the humidity and ventilation are increased in proportion to the rise in temperature. In general, temperatures that are comfortable for people also are agreeable for orchid plants.• Watering orchids must be adjusted to the need of each plant and the media in which it is grown. Many orchids can be grown in coarse cinder or even gravel. A large plant will require more water than a small one; orchids in large pots will dry out slowly compared to plants in small pots. Orchids in active growth will require more water than those in a semi-dormant state. This means that plants will require more frequent watering during the warm summer months than the cool winter season. Over-watering has been the main cause of death of orchid plants. Roots will rot, and the medium becomes soggy and soft, which is harmful to the plant. Remember, never water a wet plant under any circumstances.Fertilization can be a controversial subject. Plants growing in cinder or rock may be fertilized with a complete liquid fertilizer of a 1-1-1 ratio. Follow the directions on the label. You may apply this mixture every three to four weeks in place of a normal water application.You can minimize orchid care by attaching orchids to a tree like plumeria or calabash. That way you can have dozens of blooming orchids even in a small garden. Other epiphytes, like staghorn ferns, bromeliads and some vireya rhododendrons, may be incorporated to create air gardens.Many more rare and interesting species will be available at next weekend’s Mother’s Day Orchid Show and Sale, along with expert orchid enthusiasts to answer your gardening questions. (West Hawaii Today)

Mar 2, 2017

Obituaries for Oct. 23, 2016

Philip Kanialama InciongPhilip Kanialama Inciong, of Lihue, Kauai, and formerly of Kula, Maui, died on Sept. 18, 2016, at Wilcox Memorial Hospital in Lihue, Kauai at the age of 95.Philip is survived by his children, Alex (Suzanne) of Wisconsin, Gary of Wisconsin, Tricia Feiteira (Alan) of Maui, Cindy Nobriga (John) of Oregon, Stacie (Lee) of Kauai; numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great- grandchildren. Philip is preceded in death by his wife, Alexa Kilipohi Tavares Incion,g and by his son, Kevin James Tavares.Philip was born on Dec. 23, 1920, in Kilauea, Kauai, to Benito and Roselani Ho’oipoikamalanai Gooman Inciong. The family lived in a town what was known as Kahili and then moved to Kekaha. At the age of 8 years old, they moved to Haiku, Maui, where he graduated from Maui High School in 1938.At Maui High, he played football and track and field. He also played various sports with a charitable organization called The Alexander House Settlement for the County of Maui, Territory of Hawaii, which developed athletic programs for the public schools a... (Thegardenisland.com)

Feb 3, 2017

Obituaries for Thurday, Jan. 19, 2017

Harriet Kehaulani Kaili Rita Malapit Harriet Kehaulani Kaili Rita Malapit age 67 lost her battle with Thyroid Gland Cancer has passed away in Kula, Maui, Hawaii, on Dec. 27, 2016, at home surrounded by her hanai (caretaker’s) family, Mama Mattie Kukahiko-Kaeo, Kulani, Pono, Kapio, No’I, Tupu, Waipa “Bozo”, Tessie, Kalae and Manoha Kaeo, and her beloved dog Pojo. She was born on Waimea, Kauai, Hawaii, on Aug. 17, 1949, to Hannah Kahawaii Haleakala Kaili and Abraham Waikaka Kualu Kuwalu her parents later divorced. Her mother Hannah remarried to Joseph Nawahini Kaili, who adopted her and her siblings than took them to be sealed in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Laie, Oahu, Hawaii Temple. She is preceded in death by her parents, her husband’s Tom Rita and William “Willie” Malapit and her brother Abraham Stanley Kaili. Harriet is survived by daughter Roseann Cannon of Wainae, Oahu, Hawaii; brother Harrom Hookano Kaili (Haunani) of Anahola, Hawaii; sister’s, Dora Lima Daley (Kent) of Provo, Utah. Emmaline Kaili of Lihue, Hawaii; 6 grandchildren Kalani, Joseph, Melody, Tyler, Hallie, and Bryson; Nieces and nephews... (Thegardenisland.com)