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Novella's Flower Shoppe

Order flowers and gifts from Novella's Flower Shoppe located in Rome GA for a birthday, anniversary, graduation or a funeral service. The address of the flower shop is 2036 Maple St, Rome Georgia 30161 Zip. The phone number is (706) 291-9931. We are committed to offer the most accurate information about Novella's Flower Shoppe in Rome GA. Please contact us if this listing needs to be updated. Novella's Flower Shoppe delivers fresh flowers – order today.

Business name:
Novella's Flower Shoppe
Address:
2036 Maple St
City:
Rome
State:
Georgia
Zip Code:
30161
Phone number:
(706) 291-9931
if this is your business: ( update info) (delete this listing)
Express you love, friendship, thanks, support - or all of the above - with beautiful flowers & gifts!

Find Novella's Flower Shoppe directions to 2036 Maple St in Rome, GA (Zip 30161 ) on the Map. It's latitude and longitude coordinates are 34.225281, -85.167412 respectively.

Florists in Rome GA and Nearby Cities

250 Broad St
Rome, GA 30161
(0.59 Miles from Novella's Flower Shoppe)
5 E 4Th Ave
Rome, GA 30161
(0.64 Miles from Novella's Flower Shoppe)
430 Broad St
Rome, GA 30161
(0.66 Miles from Novella's Flower Shoppe)
55 Plainville Rd NE
Rome, GA 30161
(10.71 Miles from Novella's Flower Shoppe)
302 Main St
Cedartown, GA 30125
(17.26 Miles from Novella's Flower Shoppe)

Flowers and Gifts News

Jun 19, 2020

Gardening: This botanical garden is a hidden gem with free admission - OCRegister

One of the outstanding features of the garden is a large slope near the pond that is planted entirely with bromeliads. Last week I wrote about a bromeliad I that I had never seen before (Puya chilensis) and I am about to do that again. The plant in question is Quesnelia testudo, or turtle-head bromeliad. Its genus name honors the plant explorer Martin Quisnel and its species name testudo means turtle in Latin, a moniker given on account of the way the bromeliad’s bulbous flower head extrudes from the foliage. How ironic that it should be situated just a few feet away from the turtle convention mentioned above. It can grow in either sun or shade but its leaves are spiny so wear gloves when handling it. In truth, what we call a bromeliad flower is really a collection of bracts, the same appendages which are actually modified leaves and give color to a variety of plants from poinsettias to bougainvilleas to Anthuriums, those long-lasting indoor plants whose heart-shaped plastic-textured horizontal red bracts enclose vertical yellow flower spikes known as spadixes. Planting bromeliads on a slope makes sense for two reasons and both have to do with drainage. You do not want standing water around bromeliad roots which are typically only for structural support since these plants take in water through the cups formed by their rosetted leaves. Water on a slope is always moving downwards so rot induced from standing water on such terrain is not an issue. The other reason for bromeliad slope planting is the sensitivity many of them have to cold. Cold air, like water, drains off a slope so bromeliads will be less likely to freeze in such a location. In any event, Quesnelia is one of the more cold-tolerant bromeliads, withstanding temperatures down to 25 degrees Fahrenheit. I have learned that this outstanding plant and other Quesnelias are available through vendors on eBay. Another way to procure uncommon bromeliads would be to make contact with members of the San Fernando Valley Bromeliad Society (sfvbromeliad.homestead.com) which meets once a month in Encino or with the La Ballona Valley Bromeliad Society (bsi.org) that holds monthly meetings in West Los Angeles although such public meetings will probably be on hold for now. The Mildred Mathias Botanical Garden is famous for its dawn redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides), thought to be the tallest representative of its species in North America. It was only in 1944, in a remote part of south-central China, that the first living dawn redwoods were discove...

Feb 27, 2020

Obituary: Catherine "Kitty" Mulroe - Montclair Local

Ireland or with friends on organized trips. Memorable destinations were Nova Scotia, Germany, Rome, Medugorje, Lourdes and the Holy Land. Known as “Nana” to her many grandchildre, Kitty would often fix them milkshakes, deviled eggs or her famous “Nana bread.” Her back door was always open to her offsprings’ friends, who would come and go as if the house were their own.Fiercely proud of her Irish Catholic faith and heritage, she was a parishioner at Our Lady of the Lake Church in Verona and, prior to that, Immaculate Conception Church in Montclair. She was a member of the Rosary Altar Society and the Catholic Daughters of America.Kitty was predeceased by her husband Peter and her son Robert. She is survived by her children John (Bernadette), Peter (Susan), James (Anna), Michael (Catherine), Patricia Farley (Bob), Joseph (Lisa), Brian (Sheri); daughter-in-law Karen (Bill); grand- and great-grandchildren Michelle, Kyle, Jack, Brent, Ryan, Patrick, Victoria, Vincent, Megan, Conor, Brigid, Fiona, Danny, Katie, Catherine, Robert, Peter Michael, Peter Joseph, Michael, Pierce, Alex, Joseph, Elijah, Adrian and Nicole; sister Sheila; and brothers Jim, Tom and Dermot.Visitation will be this Sunday, Feb. 16, from 1 to 5 p.m., at the Hugh M. Moriarty Funeral Home, 76 Park St., Montclair. A mass of Christian burial follows Monday, Feb. 17, 10:30 a.m., at the Church of the Immaculate Conception, 30 North Fullerton Ave., Montclair.In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers, PO Box 302, Maryknoll, NY, 10545. For directions and online condolences visit www.moriartyfh.com.#mc_embed_signup{background:#fff;clear:left;font:14px Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;width:100%}...

Feb 1, 2020

Roses are red, violets blue. Turns out Valentine’s flowers can be recycled, too - Los Angeles Times

Examples include the American Cancer Society’s Hope Lodge at the Jerome L. Greene Family Center and the Bowery Mission Women’s Center in Manhattan. “It’s a logistics business, and we’re trying to make sure we are strategic in where we play matchmaker,” Grove says. When the charities are finished with the flowers, Repeat Roses also picks them back up and composts them. The altruism isn’t free — prices start at $1,750 for the removal and repurposing service to account for the transportation and labor costs. If you’re not willing to spend that much, the company will still compost the flowers from your event instead of sending them to a landfill.Through these two methods, Repeat Roses estimates it has diverted more than 98 tons of waste from landfills and delivered almost 53,000 floral arrangements to people in need. Advertisement Although Repeat Roses is a for-profit business, the flower repurposing itself is a tax write-off for the client. As the fair market value of a client’s donated flowers is what’s used for the charitable tax credit and is eligible for deduction, Repeat Roses ensures that the beneficiary sends you an acknowledgment letter including details of your donation. When supplying fresh flowers to customers, the company sources locally grown blooms whenever possible. If the buds must come from international destinations such as the Netherlands, Japan and Ecuador, Repeat Roses calculates the carbon offsets or makes a donation to plant a tree through The Canopy Project. For those interested in giving another life to their blooms without having to pay a fee, startup ReVased operates a flower recycling service in New York and Baltimore that will pick up the old flowers free of charge. Those hosting a big event with lots of floral arrangements can contact ReVased in advance to schedule a pick-up. The company repackages the flowers for its delivery service. For every arrangement purchased, ReVased also donates flowers to nonprofits including Levindale Geriatric Center and Hospital, Goddard Riverside Senior Center and Ronald McDonald House in New York.Sisters Arielle and Aviva Vogelstein started ReVased in 2019 after realizing how many of their own wedding flowers ended up in the trash. Although ReVased primarily works with weddings, it also repurposes flowers from business conferences, bar mitzvahs and holiday and birthday parties. “We think there is too much waste involved and want to make ourselves as accessible as possible,” Arielle says.The sisters’ venture received a boost from two tech accelerators, Conscious Venture Lab and AccelerateBaltimore, through which they raised $125,000 in funding.

Feb 1, 2020

Floral Park requests more time on Belmont project - Featured - The Island Now

The following instructions describe how to enable JavaScript for:Internet Explorer, Firefox, Netscape, Opera, Safari, Chrome, Mozilla and AOL browsers. Internet Explorer 5 and above Select Internet Options from the Tools menu. In Internet Options dialog box select the Security tab. Select the earth(Internet) icon. Click the Custom Level... button. The Security Settings dialog box will pop up. Under Active Scripting category select Enable. Click OK twice to close out. Finally, Refresh your browser. Internet Explorer 5.X for Mac OS X Select Preferences from the Explorer menu. Click the arrow next to Web Browser. Click Web Content. Under Active Content check Enable Scripting. Click OK. Finally, Refresh your browser. Internet Explorer 5 for Mac OS 9 Select Preferences from the Edit menu. Click the arrow next to Web Browser. Click Web Content. Under Active Content check Enable Scripting. Click OK. Finally, Refresh your browser. Internet Explorer 4.X Select Internet Options from the View menu. Click the Security tab. Click Custom. Click Settings. Scroll down to locate Scriptin...

Feb 1, 2020

Valentine's Day flowers don't have to be so bad for the environment after all - San Francisco Chronicle

Examples include the American Cancer Society's Hope Lodge at the Jerome L. Greene Family Center and the Bowery Mission Women's Center in Manhattan. "It's a logistics business, and we're trying to make sure we are strategic in where we play matchmaker," Grove says. When the charities are finished with the flowers, Repeat Roses also picks them back up and composts them. The altruism isn't free-prices start at $1,750 for the removal and repurposing service to account for the transportation and labor costs. If you're not willing to spend that much, the company will still compost the flowers from your event instead of sending them to a landfill. Through these two methods, Repeat Roses estimates it has diverted more than 98 tons of waste from landfills and delivered almost 53,000 floral arrangements to people in need.Although Repeat Roses is a for-profit business, the flower repurposing itself is a tax write-off for the client. As the fair market value of a client's donated flowers is what's used for the charitable tax credit and is eligible for deduction, Repeat Roses ensures that the beneficiary sends you an acknowledgment letter including details of your donation. When supplying fresh flowers to customers, the company sources locally grown blooms whenever possible. If the buds must come from international destinations such as the Netherlands Japan, and Ecuador, Repeat Roses calculates the carbon offsets or makes a donation to plant a tree through The Canopy Project. Repeat Roses also recently opened Blossom Bar, a retail space in Manhattan at Balducci's Food Lovers Market in the Hearst Tower on 56th Street. The flowers stocked there are leftover, unsold inventory from global importers and wholesalers. They come with a small compost bag to ensure you avoid sending the blooms to the landfill. In addition, the company offers a subscription service. For $180 a week, Repeat Roses will deliver fresh flowers to a home or office and donate the previous week's arrangements to a partner community organization-from where the company will also pick up withered blooms for composting and recycling. Companies such as Saks Fifth Avenue, Ketel One Vodka, David Yurman, and Maison de Mode have taken note of the opportunity prevent waste and participated in the repurposing service after their events. For those interested in giving another life to their blooms without having to pay a fee, startup ReVased operates a flower recycling service in New York and Baltimore that will pick up the old flowers free of charge. Those hosting a big event with lots of floral arrangements can contact ReVased in advance to schedule a pick-up. The company repackages the flowers for its delivery service. For every arrangement purchased, ReVased also donates flo...

Jan 4, 2020

Maple Ridge Flower Brigade brightens days of seniors - Maple Ridge News

The community living association provides many different services for adults with developmental disabilities, autism and fetal alcohol syndrome, as well as assisting their families. The association delivers the Meals on Wheels program, as well as many other activities and services, in addition to the flowers. Sawchuk put together a crew, all part of the Options Day Program with the association. The brigade spends most of its time Wednesdays making bouquets of beautiful blooms, which include roses, Gerbera daisies and carnations. Sawchuk and her team arrive at the association’s building on 227th Street in the morning to prepare a selection of flowers, then head to the care homes and knock on doors. Brigade members make the bouquets, tying them with white, green or pink ribbon, making sure that the flowers are in good shape for delivery. They choose the seniors who have either recently lost a loved one, don’t have any family or who tend to be lonely. Sawchuk works closely with the seniors and she knows from her work who in particular might be in need. “There’s so many bad things going on, it’s nice to have something that makes people happy,” Sawchuk said. She added that members of the Flower Brigade almost always receive hugs and kisses from teary-eyed residents, grateful for the gesture. Marje Magowan, a resident at Revera Sunwood Residence Senior Living Residence, 224th Street, said she “absolutely loves it.” It has also, in turn, made an impact on some of Sawchuk’s fellow bouquet creators. Mitch Aeichele, a brigade member who has been in private care at the same family for the past 30 years, never used to talk much, according to Sawchuk. But since he started delivering flowers, he now says hello to the seniors when handing out the bouquets. When Christa Klemm received her flowers from brigade member David Wason this week, she welled up and gave him a big hug. She said that the gesture means so much to her that it is hard to describe. Two seniors’ living facilities are visited by the group, Revera Sunwood Senior Living Residence and Greystone Manor, alternately each week. Magowan and other residents have also received art pieces from the members of the Flower Brigade, which now hang in their rooms. Magowan appreciates their efforts. “T...

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