Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Brunswick, GA

Find local Brunswick, Georgia florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Brunswick and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Brunswick Flower Shops

Dave's Landscaping & Nursery

131 Smith Road
Brunswick, GA 31525
(912) 264-3135

Love Knotts Florist

1908 Gloucester Street
Brunswick, GA 31520
(912) 265-3533

The Flower Basket

2440 Parkwood Dr
Brunswick, GA 31520
(912) 265-5990

The Rose & Vine

1602 New Castle St
Brunswick, GA 31520
(912) 289-9463

Brunswick GA News

Feb 1, 2020

Obituary: Andrew "Drew" Paul Ross - Press Herald

Andrew “Drew” Paul Ross BRUNSWICK – Andrew “Drew” Paul Ross, 36, passed away on Jan. 26, 2020. He was born in Brunswick and attended the Brunswick schools where he enjoyed playing basketball.Drew was a talented carpenter, plumber and painter working for several contractors in the area. The greatest joy and love of Drew’s life was his daughter, Addison. They had a very special relationship and enjoyed spending time together. They loved watching movies, going to concerts, the yearly father daughter Valentine dance, visiting his Dad in Bonita Springs Fla. and going to the beach.Family was so very important to Drew. He looked forward to the Ross Family Reunion’s at his uncle Butch and aunt Susan’s camp every summer, and he made sure he didn’t miss the occasion. Drew also made a spring trip to Florida to spend time with his dad and get out of the cold.He is survived by his daughter Addison “Addy” Ross of Brunswick; mother, Colette Ross of Brunswick, father, Paul Ross of Bonita Springs Fla; a brother, Kevin Ross; ...

Jan 4, 2020

Over Easy: Flower power in the age of aggression - Press Herald

Fighting Fiddleheads of Lincoln County, or the Brunswick Begonias, or the Newcastle Nasturtiums. Flowers have a calming effect on people. Back in 1967, young people were asked to wear flowers in their hair when visiting San Francisco for what was labeled the Summer of Love. That was flowers, not guns or blackjacks or any other kind of weapon. If we adopt this idea, anger and violence may be reduced, because who wants to hit someone dressed like a begonia? And then there’s the ritual holiday sporting events that mark some special day. For example, someday might we not be treated to our classic Thanksgiving turkey while on the television is the special holiday football game pitting the Lupins of Lincoln Academy against the Delphiniums of Morse. Who knows? Comments are not available on this story. « Previous Letter: Thank you, honest people in Maine Next » Life Unwound: From ‘them’ to ‘us’ filed under: Related Stories Latest Articles ...

Dec 18, 2019

A tree in Brazil’s arid northeast rains nectar from its flowers - Science News

While the study details H. cangaceira’s “wildly cool” pollination scheme, evolutionary ecologist Amy Parachnowitsch of the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton, Canada, suggests the team’s isolation of individual, potentially bat-attracting compounds in nectar is the tip of the iceberg. “There are so few studies that have tested nectar for scent that once we start looking there is likely to be many more examples,” says Parachnowitsch. “Scents in nectar are probably common, but we are a very long way from understanding their functional roles and if there is any differences with various pollinators.” ...

Apr 27, 2019

With flower preferences, bees have a big gap between the sexes - Phys.Org

Rutgers-owned Hutcheson Memorial Forest in Franklin Township, Somerset County. Credit: Michael Roswell/Rutgers University-New Brunswick" Agapostemon virescens, also called the bicolored striped-sweat bee, on spotted knapweed in the Rutgers-owned Hutcheson Memorial Forest in Franklin Township, Somerset County. Credit: Michael Roswell/Rutgers University-New Brunswick" A male Agapostemon virescens, also called the bicolored striped-sweat bee, on spotted knapweed in the Rutgers-owned Hutcheson Memorial Forest in Franklin Township, Somerset County. Credit: Michael Roswell/Rutgers University-New Brunswick For scores of wild bee species, females and males visit very different flowers for food—a discovery that could be important for conservation efforts, according to Rutgers-led research. Indeed, the diets of female and male bees of the same species could be as different as the diets of different bee species, according to a study in the journal PLOS ONE. "As we get...

Apr 27, 2019

Wild bee males and females like different flowers - Futurity: Research News

Rachael Winfree, a professor in the department of ecology, evolution, and natural resources at Rutgers University-New Brunswick. A female Agapostemon virescens, also called the bicolored striped-sweat bee, on prickly pear in Highland Park, New Jersey. (Credit: Michael Roswell/Rutgers-New Brunswick) Five years ago, when Winfree Lab members were evaluating federally funded programs to create habitat for pollinators, Roswell noticed that some flowers were very popular with male bees and others with females. That spurred a study to test, for as many wild bee species as possible, whether males and females visit different kinds of flowers. A male Agapostemon virescens, also called the bicolored striped-sweat bee, on spotted knapweed in the Hutcheson Memorial Forest in Franklin Township, Somerset County. (Credit: Michael Roswell/Rutgers-New Brunswick) New Jersey is home to about 400 species of wild bees—not including Apis mellifera Linnaeus, the domesticated western honeybee whose males do not forage for food, Roswell notes. The scientists collected 18,698 bees from 152 species in New Jersey. The bees visited 109 flower species in six semi-natural meadows with highly abundant and diverse flowers. The meadows were managed to promote mostly native flowers that attract pollinators. Female bees build, maintain, collect food for and defend nests, while male bees primarily seek mates. Both sexes drink floral nectar for food, but only females collect pollen that serves as food for young bees, so they forage at greater rates than males. From the flowers’ standpoint, both female and male bees are important pollinators—though female bees are more prolific because they spend more time foraging at flowers. Before mating, the males of some species travel from the area where they were born. Targeting their preferences for flowers may help maintain genetically diverse bee populations...

Apr 27, 2019

Lower Cape Fear Hospice to host 2nd Annual Festival of Flowers - WWAY NewsChannel 3

BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — The Lower Cape Fear Hospice is the region’s longest running nonprofit hospice serving more than 6,000 families annually. The organization is about to host its 2nd Annual Festival of Flowers event on Wednesday, May 1. - Advertisement - “We do this every year because we need to sustain our mission at Lower Cape Fear Hospice,” said LCFH Development Manager Anne Hewett. “We’re here for people at their end of life, for a quality end of life, its about transitioning people and helping them at the most challenging time of their life.” LCFH serves people as far north as Duplin County and as far south as Georgetown County, SC. The Festival of Flowers is a major fundraiser that helps the nonprofit raise money to continue helping people throughout our area. “We had a great turn-out for our first event and we’re hoping this year’s event is even bigger and better and its such a great cause because everyone has been affected by hospice at some point or another,” sai...