Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Adel, GA

Find local Adel, Georgia florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Adel and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Adel Flower Shops

Lynn's Flowers & Gifts

401 West 4Th Street
Adel, GA 31620
(229) 896-6257

Sister's Florist & Bakery

124 S Burwell Ave
Adel, GA 31620
(229) 896-4637

Adel GA News

Oct 15, 2020

Paul Corya | Obituary | Greensburg Daily News - Greensburg Daily News

He is also survived by two sons, P. David (Vanessa) Corya, Greensburg and Matthew Corya, Greensburg; a brother John (Adele) Corya, Greensburg; a sister Mary Ann Tebbe, Houston, Texas; three grandchildren, sister-in-law Betha (Gordon) Smiley, Greensburg; sister-in-law, Chris Maddy, Terre Haute and ten nieces and nephews. Paul was preceded in death by his parents. He was a devoted husband, loving father, and lifelong member of St. Mary's Catholic Church. A funeral Mass and celebration of life will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, October 8, 2020 at St. Mary's Catholic Church in Greensburg with Rev. John Meyer officiating. Burial will follow in the South Park Cemetery in Greensburg. In lieu of flowers the family requests memorials be made to Our Hospice of Decatur County or to the St. Mary's Catholic Church Endowment Fund. Online condolences can be made to the family at www.popfuneralhome.com Published on October 5, 2020 ...

Oct 15, 2020

Obituary: Ronald Michael Ron Secchi, Sr., 76, of Norwalk - Norwalk, CT Patch

Home) Ronald Michael "Ron" Secchi, Sr., age 76 of Norwalk, died peacefully at Norwalk Hospital on Friday, October 9. He was the loving husband of Adelaide "Honey" (Arbini) Secchi. Ron was born in Norwalk on July 13, 1944, the son of the late Michael J. and Rose (Rose) Secchi. He was a graduate of J.M. Wright Tech and was a retired electrician, having worked for I.B.E.W. Local 208/488 for many years. Ron was a member of the Norwalk Exchange Club and a past member of the South Norwalk Boat Club, Sons of Italy and Yankee Sam's. He was also a devoted member of St. Jerome Church. Ron loved people, Italian food and travelling. He loved dining on Arthur Ave. and taking long RV trips with Honey and especially enjoyed time with his grandchildren. In addition to his wife Honey, Ron is survived by his son, Ronald M. Secchi, Jr. and his wife Eileen (Sass) Secchi of Norwalk, his daughter Diane (Secchi) Ramos and her husband George Ramos of Annandale, VA, his grandchildren Alexandra and Michael Secchi, William and Gianna Ramos, his sister Sharon (Secchi) Toth of Danbury and many nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Jerome Church, 23 Half ...

Oct 15, 2020

If a sunflower blooms in a city, does it make a difference? - Columbia Chronicle

When Sunflower City was created eight years ago, only a handful of sunflowers were planted. Similar to an initiative in Philadelphia where vacant lots were turned into green spaces, Sunflower City was created to demonstrate what it means to heal the environment and a community. McHugh has a background in clean energy and once created fuel out of cooking oil. He wanted to test what growing a biofuel crop in contaminated soil would do. “We looked at sunflowers grown in contaminated soils and if we could produce a seed oil that remained free of lead and other contaminants,” McHugh said. Sunflowers were chosen because they can grow well even in contaminated soils, McHugh said. They can also contribute to clean energy and product development through the use of sunflower oil. The experiment soon became secondary, McHugh said. When the sunflower heads turned downward for the first time in 2012, McHugh knew it was time to harvest them. But he found the residents of the Washington Park neighborhood wanted the sunflower patch to become a permanent fixture. “Over time, I realized that there was something more important than a technical-scientific research project,” McHugh said. “There was something that took precedence over that, and that was what can natural beauty do for neighborhoods.” In addition to being beneficial for wildlife, green spaces in urban areas are also important for “our own human benefit and emotional well-being” to break up what is otherwise a concrete jungle, said Michele Hoffman-Trotter, adjunct faculty member in the Science and Mathematics Department. In Chicago, groups such as Chicago Eco House, 6439 S. Peoria St., are using urban agriculture to beautify neighborho...

Oct 15, 2020

Florists 'bomb' Philly mailboxes for 2020 election ballots - WHYY

Called Porch Petals, Love keeps the delivery radius tight – she only services Philadelphia’s Northwest neighborhoods near her farm. To her surprise, it worked. Porch Petals caught on and saved her business. Floral designer Diane Floss (left) and Jennie Love of Love and Fresh Flowers decorated the mailbox at Germantown Avenue and Bethlehem Pike with a rainbow of flowers for the United by Blooms event. (Emma Lee/WHYY) “Porch Petals is a COVID pivot, but it proves our community here in Chestnut Hill and Mt. Airy – they are phenomenal. I would start weeping if I think about it too much,” she said. “This community saved our farm.” Love is fortunate that she is both a grower and an arranger: she supplies herself. Other florists who rely on shipped flowers have fared much worse as international supply chains have broken down during the global pandemic. Flowers, after all, cannot sit in warehouses. United By Blooms is ostensibly a get-out-the-vote campaign addressing anxieties about voting by mail and the tenuous financial position of the Postal Service. Love says, “I don’t have answers to any of that.” More important to her is that this floral arrangement be a love letter to the community that proves, even during a pandemic, flow...

Oct 15, 2020

Dennis Koeppen Obituary - Longview, WA | The Daily News - Legacy.com

Edward L. and Helen M. Koeppen. Survivors include: a sister, Connie L. Gray, Longview, Wash., wife Deborah M. Koeppen, Tumwater, Wash., daughters Adele S. Dowlin, Oakdale, Calif., and Evelyn R. Hall, Fayetteville, NC. Grandchildren include: Carson and Isabelle Dowlin; Connor and Cayleigh Hall. He has numerous nieces and nephews. Dennis graduated from R. A. Long High School, Longview, WA. in 1960. Dennis enjoyed music and playing guitar, particularly Country and Rhythm and Blues. He enjoyed jamming with his longtime friend, Dan Whyms, who performed in a Johnny Cash Tribute Show around the world. Dan remained a close friend until the road for Dennis ended. Family and friends remember Dennis as a positive and upbeat person. He always seemed to discover the plus side of seemingly negative obstacles and challenges we all face in life. His faith beliefs kept him hopeful and trusting that the future will be glorious and eternal in Jesus Christ our Lord. Due to Covid restrictions we were unable to hold a large gathering. The family is planning to hold a Celebration of Life gathering near Dennis's Birthday in August 2021. In lieu of flowers or gifts, donations can be made to the American Cancer Society or St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.Published by The Daily News on Oct. 13, 2020.

Sep 7, 2020

'Victoria Longwood' water lilies at Hudson Gardens in Littleton are a pretty big deal - parkerchronicle.net

Britain's Crystal Palace. In 1851, specimens were also introduced in the U.S. In 1960, Longwood Gardens, near Philadelphia, introduced the “Victoria Longwood,” which is the variety found at Hudson Gardens. These remarkable plants, with the second largest leaf of any plant in the world, were introduced in the Littleton gardens in 1997 and have been growing well since. This summer, plant lovers can register to be notified when a Victoria water lily is about to open in the evening. Members of the active Colorado Water Garden Society maintain the Water Garden ponds and members meet with viewers to experience the opening of this spectacular bloom. The Victoria water lily is hermaphroditic: It changes from female to male overnight as it blooms. Leaf pads can expand more than 20 inches in a day, growing to as much as 8 feet in diameter, with each leaf lasting about a week. For most of the year, the Victoria water lily is distinguished only by these large lily pads, but in late July and early August, night-blooming flowers appear and last only 48 hours. Each plant produces about 10 to 12 flowers a season, according to the publication available at Hudson Gardens. The day before the plant flowers, a tennis ball-sized bud rises from the water and will open to reveal as many as 50 petals. Its fragrance resembles tuberose, pineapple and banana. In its native setting, the bloom reopens a second night, admitting pollinating scarab beetles, which don't live here — only in South America. The flower closes on the beetles, changes from female to male and opens to release the insects that have fertilized the plants. Hudson Gardens' information also says that the Victoria water lily is over 160 million years old — it appeared when South America was still connected to Africa and Antarctica. There are two species: Victoria Amazonica and Victoria Cruziana. Natives of South America make flour from the seeds of the Victoria water lily ...