Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections.

Christmas Flowers

Your deepest sentiments are sure to warm them from the inside out.

Poinsettias

Send a gift basket to thank someone.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Florists in Cocoa, FL

Find local Cocoa, Florida florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Cocoa and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Cocoa Flower Shops

A Basket Of Love Florist

812 S Cocoa Blvd
Cocoa, FL 32922
(321) 633-7673

Cocoa FL News

Apr 27, 2019

Take a home and garden tour through Eau Gallie - Florida Today

The Mitchell House will again host visitors, this time as one of the stops in this year’s Cocoa-Rockledge Garden Club's Eau Gallie Historic Home and Garden Tour. The tour, scheduled from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. Saturday should make for a pleasant day of investigating the charming nooks and crannies of EGAD. The mild spring weather invites visitors to enjoy a leisurely stroll around the properties, all within walking distance of each other in picture-perfect EGAD. Each stop has its own delights. Among the unique features at the Mitchell House are the parlor fireplace updated with New Orleans fireplace mantle salvaged from Hurricane Katrina and the chandelier which originally hung in a historic Merritt Island hotel. The sun room ceiling was inspired by a porch ceiling seen in Charleston and the dining room by a pineapple Alaskan chandelier purchased in Vero Beach. The laundry room was inspired by a screen door purchased ...

Apr 27, 2019

13 Earth Day 2019 Events Happening In Puget Sound - Seattle, WA Patch

Cleanup Saturday, 9 a.m. Point Defiance Marina, TacomaHelp clean up Owen Beach and the Rhododendron Garden trail network. Free coffee and hot cocoa. Post-cleanup celebration at Dystopian State Brewery. Larson Lake Cleanup Monday, 11 a.m. Samena Swim and Recreation, BellevueMeet at the front desk at 11 a.m. for a cleanup party along the Larson Lake trails. Bags and gloves provided. Hamlin Park Forest Rehab Saturday, 10 a.m. Hamlin Park, ShorelineVolunteers will remove invasive plants in the park. Tools and training provided. Adopt-A-Street Saturday, 10 a.m. Oakbrook Park, LakewoodVolunteers will clean Onyx Drive leading up to the Oakbrook entrance. Tools provided. Plant Guilds Workshop Saturday, 10 a.m. Beacon Food Forest, SeattleLearn from experts how to group trees and plants to create small ecosystems. Tools provided, but bring water and dress appropriately. Our Ocean and You Monday, 6:30 p.m. Mark Twain Elementary, KirklandThis event is for parents and kids in the Lake Washington School District with environmental speaker Annie Crawley. Keep Issaquah Beautiful Day Saturday, 9 a.m. IssaquahIssaquah residents are encouraged to pick up litter, plant flowers or anything to beautify the city. Special emphasis in the downtown area. Earth Day Ivy Pull Saturday, 9 a.m. Edmonds City ParkHelp remove invasive English ivy in the downtown-area park. Carnivorous Terrariums Class Saturday, 11 a.m. Enumclaw LibraryLearn how to care for these delicate and interesting plants. Participants will take home a fly-trap gift bag. Restoration Work Party Saturday, 10 a.m. SHADOW Lake Nature Preserve, RentonVolunteers will clean SHADOW Lake Nature Preserve. Tools pro...

Nov 15, 2018

Flowers & Bread: Seasonal items accent the lineup

Nutella always are available on the table. Another weekend treat: Chocolate rolls ($2 each) are filled with chunky chocolate and dusted with cocoa hearts on top. "We have a good time with bread," Lagrotteria said. onrestaurants@dispatch.com ...

Aug 17, 2018

On Gardening: Planning a cutting garden

Crazy Daisy” and “Sante” Roses >> try some in the caramel and terra cotta range: “Hot Cocoa”, “Cinco de Mayo”, “Pumpkin Patch Herbs >> purple basil and “Berggarten” sage for foliage and fragrance Nigella >> blue blooms, unusual seedpods, and lacy greenery are eye-catchingAfter the gardener has selected plants for the cutting garden, the options are to buy and install small plants at a garden center, or plant seeds. Buying small plants involves paying someone for starting the plants from seed, so it’s faster and more expensive than growing your own. But choices could be limited Planting seeds requires less expense, and also provides access to a wide range of options. Advertisement Seeds should be planted at the right time of the season. Some seeds should be started indoors in early spring; others are best planted in the ground in early spring, early summer, or mid-summer/early fall. This month is still a good time to start certain seeds for a cutting garden. An excellent source of recommendations for seasonal planting of seeds for flowering plants is local expert Renee Shepherd. For a timely list of flowers to plant now, browse to her website, www.reneesgarden.com, click on “Gardening Resources” and search “Time to plant Renee’s Garden Seeds.” Her seeds are among those on display in garden centers. Seed packets typically have brief instructions for successful planting of seeds. Flowering plants that have multiple, branching stems will produce maximum yield of good quality flowers with long stems when their primary stems are cut back (“pinched”) at an early stage of growth. Examples include carnation, cosmos, dahlia, and snapdragon. Pinching is not appropriate for plants that produce just one flower per plant. Examples of such plants include flax, stock, and single-stemmed sunflowers. Growing your own flowers for bouquets and floral arrangements is one of the most satisfying garden activities. A good time to start your own unique cutting garden, and beginning to gain experience and enjoy the process, is mid summer/early fall. That’s right now! Mark Your CalendarsGreat blooms for the cutting garden will be on display on Aug. 25-26 at the annual show of the Monterey Bay Dahlia Society. The event will be at the Museum of Art & History, downtown Santa Cruz. Look for details in this Home + Garden section next week. Tom Karwin is president of the Monterey Bay Area Cactus & Succulent Society, past president of the Friends of the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum, and a Lifetime UC Master Gardener (Certified 1999–2009). Visit ongardening.com for links to information on this subject, and send comments or questions to gardening@karwin.com.

Jul 26, 2018

Ivory Coast cocoa farmers buoyed by strong flowering

ABIDJAN, July 9 (Reuters) - Abundant flowers on Ivory Coast's cocoa trees last week have raised hopes for a strong October-to-March main crop, farmers said on Monday, despite below-average rainfall. Ivory Coast, the world's top cocoa producer, is wrapping up its April-to-September mid-crop and preparing for the 2018/2019 season, which opens in October this year. Crops have been helped by strong rains in recent weeks and farmers said more regular rainfall and sunshine in July and August will be crucial for flowers to bloom and develop into small pods. "The soil is still moist and the flowers are a good sign," said Albert N'Zue, who farms in the centre-western region of Daloa, which produces a quarter of Ivory Coast's output. "If it rains well through August we think trees will fill with pods over the next three months," said N'Zue. Data collected by Reuters shows that rainfall in Daloa, which includes the region of Bouafle, was at 18.5 millimeters (mm) last week, 5.6 mm below the five-year average. Farmers were also satisfied with flowering in the...

Jun 14, 2018

GARDEN SCENTS

Berlandiera lyrata), hardy to Zone 4. It blooms at night, leaving its lingering scent of hot cocoa for you to drink up in the morning.Several Cary Award-winning plants are known for their fragrance. This year's winner, native Bottlebrush Buckeye (Aesculus parviflora), has sweetly scented white flower spikes, is hardy to Zone 4 and grows in the shade. It is a good-sized shrub reaching 6 to 8 feet tall and deer don't seem to bother with it.Last year's winner was Korean Abelia (Abelia mosanesis). It is a small shrub that grows 4 to 6 feet tall and is hardy to Zone 4. It has no pests or disease problems and deer shun its glossy leaves. Once established it tolerates dry conditions and its extremely fragrant pale pink flower clusters attract butterflies.Native shrub Summersweet (Clethra alnifolia) is a previous Cary winner that grows in part shade, likes a wet location, and has luscious smelling flowers. Look for white or pink Ruby Spice. They bloom July and August, grow 4 to 8 feet tall and wide and are hardy to Zone 4. We have both and can vouch for their carefree nature and wonderful scent.If you love the look of wisteria but were afraid to try it, look for 2014 Cary winning American Wisteria (Wisteria frutescans). Unlike the aggressive-growing Asian varieties bent on world domination, this one only grows 10 to 12 feet a year and can be kept in check with annual pruning once it has finished flowering. Native to Texas, it has purple or white racemes of sweetly scented flowers that hang down in clusters from the vines.You can't go wrong with a Cary Award winner. They have been fully vetted and chosen for their excellent performance in New England gardens. To see all the past winners, go to caryaward.towerhillbg.org.Talking about vines don't overlook honeysuckle, annual sweet peas, sweet autumn clematis or the hyacinth-scented corkscrew vine (Vigna caracalla).If you can find the bulbs, you have to try Acidanthera. Also called Abyssinian glad or peacock orchid, it is in the gladiola family and is easily grown from bulbs each year. Other than its sword-like foliage, it doesn't look like a glad at all, but more like an exotic white orchid with a maroon throat. Tuck the bulbs into flower beds between other plants and when they blossom in late summer or early fall you will be surprised by how pretty and fragrant they are. Each bulb bears several flowers that are good for cutting.Become inspired to add plants for your other senses by reading Tovah Martin's new book The Garden in Every Sense...