Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Connecticut, CT Florists

Find florist in Connecticut state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a Connecticut city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

Connecticut Cities

Connecticut State Featured Florists

Cheshire Flower Shop

1089 S Main St
Cheshire, CT 06410

Rosy's Flowers

21 Jetland Pl
Bridgeport, CT 06605

Grove Gardens Florist Llc

341 E Main St
Clinton, CT 06413

The Florist Shop

763 Straits Tpke
Watertown, CT 06795

Petal Perfection And Confections

660 Main St S
Woodbury, CT 06798

Connecticut Flowers News

Oct 15, 2020

Don't let the name fool you—Floral Park Market is one of the best places to grocery shop - Atlanta Magazine

Westside. Michelle, his wife of 22 years, grew up on a dairy farm in rural Connecticut; her passion for fresh, local food pushed the flower store to pivot to consumables in the fall of 2016. A vegetarian herself, she doesn’t mind selling fresh sausages, plump organic chicken leg quarters, and big crimson steaks cut from grass-fed local beef.The prepared food is indeed worth the trip alone, ranging from turmeric hummus and dehydrated basil crackers (from healthy-eating guru David Sweeney of the late, lamented Dynamic Dish) to beauteous cold cucumber soup (from Simply Fresh), delicate fresh macarons (from Deborah Johnson, who lived in Paris for more than 20 years and was schooled at Le Cordon Bleu) to frozen wood-fired pizza (from a Brooklyn outfit that got its start on Shark Tank).But that’s hardly the market’s sole selling point. There is a station for dispensing locally made Golda’s CBD kombucha on tap, shelves of local H+F breads next to two crockpots of boiled peanuts, and a large display of organic hand-milled grains. Floral Park Market doesn’t feel like a glorified convenience store. Everything from the spicy Portuguese tinned sardines to the roasted pecans whose proceeds benefit Meals on Wheels has been carefully sourced. If your ideal shopping list includes freshly baked banana bread, a bottle of elderberry syrup, high-quality CBD products, and in-house pickles, jams, and honey butter, there’s no better market in town. And as someone who has long been committed to the imperative to shop local, I’m kicking myself for not finding my way to Floral Park Market sooner.This article appears in our October 2020 issue.Advertisement...

Oct 15, 2020

Middletown cops: Woman stole health center flowers to ‘spread love’ - Middletown Press

Photo: Hearst Connecticut Media File Photo Photo: Hearst Connecticut Media File Photo Image 1 of / 1 Caption Close Image 1 of 1 The Middletown Police Department at 222 Main St. The Middletown Police Department at 222 Main St.

May 1, 2020

12 Native Flowers Are Easy from Seed - Zip06.com

ErnstSeed.com in Meadville, Pennsylvania, which carries some regional ecotypes.Don’t forget to search the online catalogs of Connecticut seed companies, which also feature a wide variety of native plant seeds: www.HartSeed.com, www.NESeed.com, and www.SelectSeeds.com. Finally, if you want to check the native status of any plant, visit GoBotany.NativePlantTrust.org and enter the common or botanical name. Are you ready for success with seeds? You’ll love the results from these 12 native flowers, and so will your fellow creatures.Be Sure to Get the Right OnesIn the order they appeared in this article, here are 12 natives to sow directly into prepared soil. Be sure to check the botanical names, both genus and species, to get the plants described in this article.• Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta)• Spotted bee balm (Monarda punctata)• Partridge pea (Chamaecrista fasciculata)• Wreath goldenrod (Solidago caesia)• Downy goldenrod (Solidago puberula)• White wood aster (Eurybia divaricata)• White snakeroot (Ageratina altissima)• Cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis)• Orange forget-me-not, a.k.a jewelweed (Impatiens capensis)• Common violet (Viola soraria)• White yarrow, (Achillea millefolium)• Anise hyssop, (Agastache foeniculum) Kathy Connolly is a writer and speaker on horticulture, landscape design, and ecology from Old Saybrook. Reach her by email or join her newsletter through her website www.SpeakingofLandscapes.com.

Mar 19, 2020

How the monkeyflower gets its spots - UC Berkeley

UConn Today In a new paper, Blackman and his group at UC Berkeley, in collaboration with Yaowu Yuan and his group at the University of Connecticut, reveal for the first time the genetic programming that helps the monkeyflower — and likely other patterned flowers — achieve their spotted glory. The study was published online today (Thursday, Feb. 20) in the journal Current Biology. “While we know a good deal about how hue is specified in flower petals — whether it is red or orange or blue, for instance — we don’t know a lot about how those pigments are then painted into patterns on petals during development to give rise to these spots and stripes that are often critical for interacting with pollinators,” Blackman said. “Our lab, in collaboration with others, has developed the genetic tools to be able to identify the genes related to these patterns and perturb them so that we can confirm what’s actually going on.” In the study, the research team used CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to recreate the yellow monkeyflower patterns found in nature. On the left, a wild-type monkeyflower exhibits the typical spotted pattern. In the middle, a heterozygote with one normal RTO gene and one damaged RTO gene exhibits blotchier spots. And on the right, homozygote with two copies of the damaged RTO gene is all red, with no spots. (UC Berkeley photo by Srinidhi Holalu) The positions of petals’ spots aren’t mapped out ahead of time, like submarines in a game of battleship, Blackman said. Instead, scientists have long theorized that they could come about through the workings of an activator-repressor system, following what is known as a reaction-diffusion model, in which an activator molecule stimulates a cell to produce the red-colored pigment that produces a spot. At the same time, a repressor molecule is expressed and sent to neighboring cells to instruct them not to produce the red pigment. The results are small, dispersed bunches of red cells surrounded by cells that keep...

Mar 19, 2020

Garden Club to Host “Secret Gardens of Woodbridge” - Woodbridge Town News

The featured gardens include a few of historical significance, two of which are anchored by outstanding Notable Trees of Connecticut. Of these properties, one is extensively documented in the Smithsonian’s archives. A lovely sprawling pollinator garden filled with native plantings is also open for an inspiring visit. Other gardens include lovely water elements with sweeping lawns and flower beds, a peaceful Shakespeare Garden, various themed garden rooms, vegetable and kitchen gardens as well as rose gardens. The tour is rounded out by a spectacular and playful garden designed and tended to by a gifted and talented Master Gardener and State Flower Show Judge. The day promises to be enjoyable and inspiring for all. The tour will be the major fundraiser for The Garden Club of Woodbridge. The club’s many civic activities include the upkeep of three gardens around town, a horticulture therapy program for memory impaired residents at Coachman Square, and support of activities at the Massaro Farm, the Woodbridge Library, and the Woodbridge Center, as well as an annual scholarship for an Amity High School graduate from Woodbridge. The Garden Club of Woodbridge has sixty-four members with a shared purpose to promote interest, education, and involvement in individual and civic gardening of all kinds including horticulture, floriculture, arrangement of flowers, bird life and conservation activities. New member...