Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections.

Nikkibana Floral Design

Order flowers and gifts from Nikkibana Floral Design located in San Diego CA for a birthday, anniversary, graduation or a funeral service. The address of the flower shop is 6090 Friars Rd, San Diego California 92108 Zip. The phone number is (619) 587-2676. We are committed to offer the most accurate information about Nikkibana Floral Design in San Diego CA. Please contact us if this listing needs to be updated. Nikkibana Floral Design delivers fresh flowers – order today.

Business name:
Nikkibana Floral Design
Address:
6090 Friars Rd
City:
San Diego
State:
California
Zip Code:
92108
Phone number:
(619) 587-2676
if this is your business: ( update info) (delete this listing)
Express you love, friendship, thanks, support - or all of the above - with beautiful flowers & gifts!

Find Nikkibana Floral Design directions to 6090 Friars Rd in San Diego, CA (Zip 92108) on the Map. It's latitude and longitude coordinates are 32.7666053684811, -117.184061919943 respectively.

Florists in San Diego CA and Nearby Cities

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San Diego, CA 92115
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4832 Home Ave
San Diego, CA 92105
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2405 El Cajon Blvd
San Diego, CA 92104
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4235 Texas St
San Diego, CA 92104
(2.49 Miles from Nikkibana Floral Design)

Flowers and Gifts News

Aug 3, 2020

Howard Dungan - Obituary - Legacy.com

Frances Latham who settled in Rhode Island by 1638 and known as "The Mother of Governors," former teacher and counselor with the San Diego Unified School District, passed away July 12, 2020, in Alvarado Hospital of complications of a pancreatic mass and congestive heart failure.Howard was born in Newark, Nebraska August 2, 1920, raised on the family homestead farm there, rode a pony to a one-room schoolhouse, did homework by kerosene lamp, drew water from an outdoor hand pump, and graduated from high school in Kearney, Nebraska where he lettered in sports and set pins in a bowling alley at night. He completed a semester of college in Kearney, picked apples in Colorado, was a carpenter's helper, worked with poultry, tried out fora farm club of the St. Louis Cardinals, and went hungry sometimes as it was the Great Depression. He later learned banking at an uncle's bank in Ilwako, Washington, and helped his parents move off the Nebraska farm in a packed car with little more than the change in their pockets and had to leave his beloved dog, Fritz, behind in the care of a tenant. By 1940 he joined his parents and other relatives in San Diego and did clerical work for Cadahy Packing Company.It was during a day trip to T...

May 1, 2020

Coronavirus hit California's cut-flower industry at the worst time - Los Angeles Times

Coastal farms from San Diego County through Humboldt County likewise laid off most of their workers and went into dormancy at the very time when they usually earn the bulk of revenue — the string of holidays from Valentine’s Day through Mother’s Day. Chain groceries were among the first to cancel orders, said F.J. Trzuskowski, vice president of sales for Washington-based Continental Floral Greens, which grows the “supporting cast” green foliage for bouquets on three California farms. Advertisement “There was no forewarning of this. It was like, ‘Hey, stop all shipments starting now,’” Trzuskowski said. “Then with social distancing, all of a sudden the wholesaler can’t be open to the public. It was a very quick stop to the industry.”Mellano said he also was hit hard by cancellations of events such as conferences, particularly in Las Vegas. Weddings were put off, along with their roses, said Eufloria’s Nelson.“Maybe they didn’t happen right now, but they’re going to happen, right?” he said. “We just don’t know what size they’re going to be when they do happen. Budgets are going to be different.” Advertisement The California Cut Flower Commission has told its members that floriculture is protected under the agricultural exemption to closure orders. But with the collapse of the distribution pipeline, the clarification amounts to a technicality. Los Angeles’ historic flower market, like others around the nation, is a ghost town. “We’ve got wholesale companies closing down and retail stores, which in some cases have business, are losing their normal lines of distribution,” CEO Pruitt said. “We’re in the process of trying to put that back together.”Pruitt said it’s hard to predict how many farms will fail and which ones will have enough funds left to reboot once demand increases. Growers could switch crops or hedge their bets, as some of the financially strapped greenhouse operations did by leasing space for cannabis cultivation when that crop was added to the California agricultural portfolio in 2016.Cut flowers are a $1.3-billion industry nationwide, though most of that revenue comes from the sale of imported flowers, predominantly from Colombia, according to the UC Davis Agricultural Issues Center. Domestic growers account for about 27% of national sales, down from 37% roughly a decade ago. California-grown flowers account for three-quarters of the national domestic sales, according to the UC Davis researchers. Advertisement Trade deals that favored Andean nations in South America as part of the war on drugs are largely responsible for the decline of California’s flower industry. While Colombia and Ecuador dominate the market for bouquet mainstays such as carnations, chrysanthemums, gerbera and roses, California growers shifted to species that can’t be grown in the cool upland valleys of the Andes.Longtime California growers switched to Continental’s specialty — the “supporting cast” of greenery in traditional bouquets including ferns, eucalyptus and Israeli ruscus, as well as Christmas trees and holly. That stock can be sustained through the shutdown. Eufloria’s roses, likewise, can survive. But they all have to be nourished, pruned and protected from weather and insects.“As long as we irrigate and we do pest control, they’re still in good shape for sales when this opens up,” Mellano said. “Probably 35% of our crop mix are annual crops, and those have to be picked when they’re ready, within days, or else t...

Mar 19, 2020

Exploring San Diego: Circus acts, Flower Fields open, Mariachi Fest - 10News

SAN DIEGO (KGTV) — The circus comes to San Diego this weekend in a pair of fun events and, of course, the craft beer and spirits are flowing elsewhere.Circus Vargas brings the big top back to Mission Valley for a weekend of acrobatic and astounding acts by circus performers. Chula Vista also hosts Circus in the Park with shows and workshops with performers with Fern Street Circus.Carlsbad's Flower Fields open for business this weekend, with their 50-acre display of beautiful Ranunculus flowers in bloom for the spring.The Mission Valley Craft Beer and Food Festival serves up delicious craft beers and food with a bacon twist from independent brewers and local chefs. The Mariachi Fest also pairs dazzling mariachi and folklórico performances with taco and tequila tastings in Escondido.THURSDAYCircus VargasWhere: Westfield Mission Valley; Cost: $17 - $72Take your kids to the Big Top for a weekend packed with circus action as Circus Vargas hits Westfield Mission Valley. Acrobats, daredevils,...

Feb 27, 2020

Muncie Origins: Normandy Flower Shop continues family florist tradition - Ball State Daily News

Benken’s adult children. Audrey Scott, Benken’s daughter, said she once left Muncie with her husband to move to San Diego. Scott made a career for herself working at a vet clinic but found herself missing Normandy Flower Shop. Now, she is her family's fourth generation of florists. “I delivered something to someone on [Ball State’s] campus one time, and she said, ‘It's so pretty, thank you,’” Scott said. “You could just hear this college girl squealing because she was so excited to get flowers. I didn't get to see it, but I heard it after she shut the door." Because of the internet, Benken said, the floral business has changed over the years. Many times, customers will come in with images of designs they specifically want, and this can lead to needing to substitute flowers within their desired design. “[Customers] find something they want, and they expect you to have all of that, and you got to do it today and get it delivered,” Benken said. “Sometimes it's possible, but sometimes we have to substitute things. We try [to keep supplies in stock.] I try more now than ever to carry everything there is. So many people, instead of just calling us, a brick and mortar actual flower shop, go through what we call order gatherers… They pretend to be flower shops, but they aren't even a flower shop. They're just getting your money.” Even with the changing industry, Benken said she enjoys the challenge when someone gives the shop the creative freedom behind a flower arrangement. “[I enjoy] when we can do something creative, and it’s not a picture of something [a customer] has seen online,” Benken said. “They give you some money, they give you a general idea and you just run with it.” Contact Pauleina Brunnemer with comments at pdbrunnemer@bsu.edu or on Twitter @pauleina15.

Feb 1, 2020

Mosquitoes Are Drawn to Flowers As Much as People — Now Scientists Finally Know Why - SciTechDaily

Riffell’s team, which includes researchers at the UW, Virginia Tech and UC San Diego, has discovered the chemical cues that lead mosquitoes to pollinate a particularly irresistible species of orchid. As they report in a paper published online on December 23, 2019, in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the orchid produces a finely balanced bouquet of chemical compounds that stimulate mosquitoes’ sense of smell. On their own, some of these chemicals have either attractive or repressive effects on the mosquito brain. When combined in the same ratio as they’re found in the orchid, they draw in mosquitoes as effectively as a real flower. Riffell’s team also showed that one of the scent chemicals that repels mosquitoes lights up the same region of the mosquito brain as DEET, a common and controversial mosquito repellant. Their findings show how environmental cues from flowers can stimulate the mosquito brain as much as a warm-blooded host — and can draw the mosquito toward a target or send it flying the other direction, said Riffell, who is the senior author of the study. The researchers used bags placed over the orchids to collect samples of their scents in the field. Credit: Kiley Riffell The blunt-leaf orchid, or Platanthera obtusata, grows in cool, high-latitude climates across the Northern Hemisphere. From field stations in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest in Washington state, Riffell’s team verified past research showing that local mosquitoes pollinate this species, but not its close relatives that grow in the same habitat. When researchers covered the flowers with bags — depriving the mosquitoes of a visual cue for the flower — the mosquitoes would still land on the bagged flowers and attempt to feed through the canvas. Orchid scent obviously attracted the mosquitoes. To find out why, Riffell’s team turned to the individual chemicals that make up the blunt-leaf orchid’s scent. “We often describe ‘scent’ as if it’s one thing — like the scent of a flower, or the scent of a person,” said Riffell. “Scen...

Feb 1, 2020

Mosquitoes are drawn to flowers as much as people — and now scientists know why - UW News

Riffell’s team, which includes researchers at the UW, Virginia Tech and UC San Diego, has discovered the chemical cues that lead mosquitoes to pollinate a particularly irresistible species of orchid. As they report in a paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the orchid produces a finely balanced bouquet of chemical compounds that stimulate mosquitoes’ sense of smell. On their own, some of these chemicals have either attractive or repressive effects on the mosquito brain. When combined in the same ratio as they’re found in the orchid, they draw in mosquitoes as effectively as a real flower. Riffell’s team also showed that one of the scent chemicals that repels mosquitoes lights up the same region of the mosquito brain as DEET, a common and controversial mosquito repellant. The researchers used bags placed over the orchids to collect samples of their scents in the field.Kiley Riffell Their findings show how environmental cues from flowers can stimulate the mosquito brain as much as a warm-blooded host — and can draw the mosquito toward a target or send it flying the other direction, said Riffell, who is the senior author of the study. The blunt-leaf orchid, or Platanthera obtusata, grows in cool, high-latitude climates across the Northern Hemisphere. From field stations in the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest in Washington state, Riffell’s team verified past research showing that local mosquitoes pollinate this species, but not its close relatives that grow in the same habitat. When researchers covered the flowers with bags — depriving the mosquitoes of a visual cue for the flower — the mosquitoes would still land on the bagged flowers and attempt to feed through the canvas. Orchid scent obviously attracted the mosquitoes. To find out why, Riffell’s team turned to the individual chemicals that make up the blunt-leaf orchid’s scent. “We often describe ‘scent’ as if it’s one thing — like the scent of a flower, or the scent of a person,” said Riffell. “Scent is actually a complex combination of chemicals — the scent of a rose consists of more than 300 — and mosquitoes can d...

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