Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Chino Hills, CA

Find local Chino Hills, California florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Chino Hills and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Chino Hills Flower Shops

Chino Hills CA News

May 1, 2020

Plan ahead, Mother's Day is not cancelled - Claremont Courier

Wisteria delivers to the cities of Claremont, Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, Fontana, Ontario, Chino, Chino Hills, San Dimas, La Verne and Glendora. Aromatique 319 W. First St., Ste A, Claremont Aromatique is a unique skincare salon, and a bath and body shopping boutique. The licensed staff provides expert skincare treatments such as facials, massage, waxing, make-up artistry, microdermabrasion, permanent make-up, airbrush tanning, lash extensions and various other skincare specialties that hardworking moms can enjoy once the stay home orders are lifted. For $69 (a $10 savings) you can purchase a gift certificate for a 55-minute classic facial, Swedish massage or reflexology session. Aromatique offers free porch delivery within a 15-mile radius for any skincare or gift items and free gift wrapping. Orders can be placed by calling (909) 626-7422 or emailing admin@aromatiqueskincare.com. Visit www.aromatiqueskincare.com for information. Jasmine 271 W. Second St., Claremont Jasmine offers customized Mother’s Day arrangements with shipping, and free local delivery from Glendora to Rancho Cucamonga. Gifts range from $35 to $100, including bath and body products, and loungewear. You can even choose between bath and shower products. Jasmine staff will work with you over the phone to pick products. To place an order, call (909) 659-5909 or email jasminestoreclaremont@gmail.com.

Mar 19, 2020

Eight places to see wildflowers in Southern California - Los Angeles Times

Little shade. Carry water. Info: Griffith Park, (323) 644-2050. Open 5 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Dogs on leash at all times.No bicycles on trails. Chino Hills State Park figure class="Figure" readabilit...

Feb 27, 2020

Chino Hills woman celebrates 100th birthday with family, friends - Chino Champion

Prohibition had taken effect the day before.One hundred years later, Mrs. Barak’s family and friends gathered in Chino Hills at her daughter Ann Vineyard’s home to celebrate the centenarian’s long life.Mrs. Barak, a resident of Pacific Senior Living in the Butterfield Ranch area of Chino Hills, was born and grew up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the oldest of six children. She has been a California resident for decades but has kept in touch with her many friends from all stages of her life.She played the saxophone in a marching band and played the oboe and piano as well. She and her late husband Val loved to dance and attended many polka parties well into their eighties.She also enjoys reading and keeps up with her friends and family with hand-written letters and handmade cards.Among the 43 adults and eight children at the birthday party was a group of friends from the “old neighborhood” of 94th Street in Milwaukee, where she and her husband raised their four children, Ed Barak, Alan Barak, Margaret Coonan and Mrs. Vineyard.All four children and seven of her eight grandchildren were at the birthday bash. Her younger sisters, Ruth and Dolores, both in their 90s, were also there.Guests came from as far as Hawaii, Wisconsin, Cayucos and Palm Springs.Mrs. Barak’s party was decorated...

Nov 28, 2018

Endangered Brodiaea plant produces ‘super bloom’ in hills above Glendora - The San Gabriel Valley Tribune

California poppy, as seen in record numbers in Hemet, Lancaster and Chino Hills. Instead, the thread-leafed Brodiaea, as they are more commonly known, bunch in clusters of eight to 10, standing tall on thin, spindly, green stems, unfurling their star-like purple-striped flowers under the shade of an oak or amidst the shelter of the taller, beige-colored wild oat plants. On Thursday, Croissant walked the lower meadow, explaining how the unusual plant deposits its seeds, known as corms, in the volcanic, clay soil during the winter unique to the Glendora hills. A bounty of rainfall grew the green leaves and stems, producing flowers three days before Earth Day, on April 19, she said. “Here they come!” she exclaimed, pointing to a bunch in the middle of the tall wild oats. “They sneak up on you.” Toward the south end of the 4-acre meadow, the bunches appeared more frequently. “They look for a place to hide, like finding a companion plant,” she explained. That way they can be protected from ravenous deer. “They are survivors.” Even the Colby Fire of January 2014 did not stop them. In fact, the ash from the fire helped enhance the soil, which helped the Brodiaea to germinate. These Brodiaea filifolia in Glendora are the purest of the species, she said. They are pollinated by a bee fly, which keeps their DNA the same. About 20,000 plants are thriving along the ridgeline above the Colby Trail. In Bluebird Canyon exist another 5,000 and about another 10,000 in another hillside canyon, she said. The Colby Trail is open to the public during the daytime. Croissant reminds everyone to stay on the trails. “They are state and federally protected, so that means you could be arrested or cited for any kind of abuse to the plant,” she said. The Glendora Conservancy is hosting a Brodiaea Month and is offering a special program on the plant on May 20 at the Glendora Library, with a lecture by Croissant and a video on the plant’s history. The plant is the city’s official flower. Glendora is the only city in California with an endangered species as its city flower.

Dec 8, 2017

Holiday traditions continue with The Nutcracker at Bridges

Kelsey Dorr from Lake Forest in Orange County, who among other roles will dance a Rose in Waltz of the Flowers, and Lawrence Chen—a young artist from Chino Hills who is also pursuing a mathematics degree at Pomona College—will be dancing The Nutcracker Prince, the Spanish Soloist, Russian and the Soldier Doll. “We are always excited to share our beautiful production of the Nutcracker with loyal fans and new audiences,” Artistic Director Victoria Koenigs said. “This year we are thrilled to introduce five outstanding new dancers who have just joined the company. You don’t want to miss these inspiring dancers who all bring fresh and unique qualities to their roles.”The Nutcracker was first presented in 1892 at the Maryinsky Theater in St. Petersburg, Russia. The ballet was an adaptation of the 1816 story, The Nutcracker and the Mouse King, by E.T.A. Hoffman. The ballet was choreographed by Lev Ivanov with music by Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Marius Petipa, the reigning choreographer at the Maryinsky, fell ill, so the job passed to Ivanov. Tchaikovsky only reluctantly accepted the commission to compose the score which, when completed, he considered “infinitely worse than Sleeping Beauty.”At the premiere, the ballet was deemed a complete failure. More than 60 years and many productions would pass before The Nutcracker would become a staple of the repertoire in ballet companies around the world and one of the universal traditions of the holiday season.IPB’s educational outreach program, “A Young Person’s Guide to the Ballet,” is back this season for students from local area schools. Students are encouraged to participate in simple movement activities in their seats and then view the professional ballet performance, followed by a question and answer session. Teachers also have access to a free study guide to continue the conversation back in the classroom with pre- and post-performance activities aligned through the California State Content Standards for Dance, California Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and the California English Language Development Standards. For many of these students, this will be the first time they get to experience live performance art, being in a theater and learning about ballet.Children’s tickets for IPB’s The Nutcracker start at $23, senior tickets start at $38 and adult tickets start at $41, with premium seats at $59. Group discounts are available.Performances take place from December 9 and 10 at 2 p.m. and December 9 at 7:30 p.m. at Bridges Auditorium at Pomona College, 450 N. College Way, in Claremont.Additional regional performances are offered on December 15 and 16 at 7:30 p.m. and December 16 and 17 at 2 p.m. at Lewis Family Playhouse in Rancho Cucamonga; and December 22 and 23 at 7:30 p.m. and December 23 at 2 p.m. at the Fox Performing Arts Center in Riverside.For more information or to purchase tickets, visit ipballet.org.

Jul 27, 2017

Endangered Brodiaea plant produces 'super bloom' in hills above ...

California poppy, as seen in record numbers in Hemet, Lancaster and Chino Hills.Instead, the thread-leafed Brodiaea, as they are more commonly known, bunch in clusters of eight to 10, standing tall on thin, spindly, green stems, unfurling their star-like purple-striped flowers under the shade of an oak or amidst the shelter of the taller, beige-colored wild oat plants.AdvertisementOn Thursday, Croissant walked the lower meadow, explaining how the unusual plant deposits its seeds, known as corms, in the volcanic, clay soil during the winter unique to the Glendora hills. A bounty of rainfall grew the green leaves and stems, producing flowers three days before Earth Day, on April 19, she said.“Here they come!” she exclaimed, pointing to a bunch in the middle of the tall wild oats. “They sneak up on you.”Toward the south end of the 4-acre meadow, the bunches appeared more frequently.“They look for a place to hide, like finding a companion plant,” she explained. That way they can be protected from ravenous deer. “They are survivors.”Even the Colby Fire of January 2014 did not stop them. In fact, the ash from the fire helped enhance the soil, which helped the Brodiaea to germinate.These Brodiaea filifolia in Glendora are the purest of the species, she said. They are pollinated by a bee fly, which keeps their DNA the same.About 20,000 plants are thriving along the ridgeline above the Colby Trail. In Bluebird Canyon exist another 5,000 and about another 10,000 in another hillside canyon, she said.The Colby Trail is open to the public during the daytime. Croissant reminds everyone to stay on the trails. “They are state and federally protected, so that means you could be arrested or cited for any kind of abuse to the plant,” she said.The Glendora Conservancy is hosting a Brodiaea Month and is offering a special program on the plant on May 20 at the Glendora Library, with a lecture by Croissant and a video on the plant’s history. The plant is the city’s official flower. Glendora is the only city in California with an endangered species as its city flower. (The San Gabriel Valley Tribune)