Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Azusa, CA

Find local Azusa, California florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Azusa and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Azusa Flower Shops

Heavenly Flowers

5571 N Azusa Ave
Azusa, CA 91702
(626) 969-5454

Azusa CA News

Nov 28, 2018

Endangered Brodiaea plant produces ‘super bloom’ in hills above Glendora - The San Gabriel Valley Tribune

And they are flourishing at super-bloom status,” said Ann Croissant, a plant physiologist, botanist, professor emeritus from Azusa Pacific University and the founder and president of the Glendora Community Conservancy. Listed as endangered by the state of California and threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act, the shy plant that stopped a housing project in 1989 and sparked a community conservancy movement in this conservative town is now in the midst of the largest bloom in modern times. When the Conservancy began buying land to preserve plant and animal species in the hills above Glendora and Azusa, it purchased property known as the Colby Trail at the top of Loraine Avenue in eastern Glendora. On a meadow badly damaged by agricultural activity, botanists counted 900 plants in 1993. That grew to 6,900 plants in 2012 and about 8,500 today, Croissant estimates. “They are spectacular. It’s just incredible what’s going on even in the lower level of the Colby Trail,” she said. “This is the best bloom I’ve ever seen.” The debutantes of the bloom ball being celebrated in Southern California this spring don’t display a blanket-like palette like the state flower, the orange-hued California poppy, as seen in record numbers in Hemet, Lancaster and Chino Hills. Instead, the thread-leafed Brodiaea, as they are more commonly known, bunch in clusters of eight to 10, standing tall on thin, spindly, green stems, unfurling their star-like purple-striped flowers under the shade of an oak or amidst the shelter of the taller, beige-colored wild oat plants. On Thursday, Croissant walked the lower meadow, explaining how the unusual plant deposits its seeds, known as corm...

Jul 27, 2017

Endangered Brodiaea plant produces 'super bloom' in hills above ...

County where they exist. And they are flourishing at super-bloom status,” said Ann Croissant, a plant physiologist, botanist, professor emeritus from Azusa Pacific University and the founder and president of the Glendora Community Conservancy.Listed as endangered by the state of California and threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act, the shy plant that stopped a housing project in 1989 and sparked a community conservancy movement in this conservative town is now in the midst of the largest bloom in modern times. When the Conservancy began buying land to preserve plant and animal species in the hills above Glendora and Azusa, it purchased property known as the Colby Trail at the top of Loraine Avenue in eastern Glendora. On a meadow badly damaged by agricultural activity, botanists counted 900 plants in 1993. That grew to 6,900 plants in 2012 and about 8,500 today, Croissant estimates.“They are spectacular. It’s just incredible what’s going on even in the lower level of the Colby Trail,” she said. “This is the best bloom I’ve ever seen.”The debutantes of the bloom ball being celebrated in Southern California this spring don’t display a blanket-like palette like the state flower, the orange-hued California poppy, as seen in record numbers in Hemet, Lancaster and Chino Hills.Instead, the thread-leafed Brodiaea, as they are more commonly known, bunch in clusters of eight to 10, standing tall on thin, spindly, green stems, unfurling their star-like purple-striped flowers under the shade of an oak or amidst the shelter of the taller, beige-colored wild oat plants.AdvertisementOn Thursday, Croissant walked the lower meadow, explaining how the unusual plant deposits its seeds, known as corms, in the volcanic, clay s... (The San Gabriel Valley Tribune)

May 25, 2017

Endangered Brodiaea plant produces 'super bloom' in hills above Glendora

County where they exist. And they are flourishing at super-bloom status,” said Ann Croissant, a plant physiologist, botanist, professor emeritus from Azusa Pacific University and the founder and president of the Glendora Community Conservancy.Listed as endangered by the state of California and threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act, the shy plant that stopped a housing project in 1989 and sparked a community conservancy movement in this conservative town is now in the midst of the largest bloom in modern times. When the Conservancy began buying land to preserve plant and animal species in the hills above Glendora and Azusa, it purchased property known as the Colby Trail at the top of Loraine Avenue in eastern Glendora. On a meadow badly damaged by agricultural activity, botanists counted 900 plants in 1993. That grew to 6,900 plants in 2012 and about 8,500 today, Croissant estimates.“They are spectacular. It’s just incredible what’s going on even in the lower level of the Colby Trail,” she said. “This is the best bloom I’ve ever seen.”The debutantes of the bloom ball being celebrated in Southern California this spring don’t display a blanket-like palette like the state flower, the orange-hued California poppy, as seen in record numbers in Hemet, Lancaster and Chino Hills.Instead, the thread-leafed Brodiaea, as they are more commonly known, bunch in clusters of eight to 10, standing tall on thin, spindly, green stems, unfurling their star-like purple-striped flowers under the shade of an oak or amidst the shelter of the taller, beige-colored wild oat plants.AdvertisementOn Thursday, Croissant walked the lower meadow, explaining how the unusual plant deposits its seeds, known as corms, in the volcanic, clay s... (The San Gabriel Valley Tribune)

Apr 20, 2017

Planting flowers, shrubs and trees this spring? Here's where they were born

Monrovia, under the direction of Harry E. Rosedale, started growing plants outside a small house in the city of Monrovia in 1926. It moved to Azusa, where for decades business flourished before the land was sold 10 years ago. Azusa remains the main office of the container plant business, which today encompasses more than 4,000 varieties and 22 million plants. Fields with plants that “Grow Beautifully,” as the company boasts, are in Visalia; Dayton, Oregon; Cairo, Georgia; and Granby, Connecticut.Monrovia is one of the country’s largest growers of container perennials, trees and shrubs, with four growing areas chosen for a diversity of climates and conditions.“We want to be able to grow peonies that like the cold to water-wise plants for Southern California as well as to be able to ship all year long,” said Kate Karam, Monrovia spokeswoman.Southern California gardeners have Monrovia plants grown mainly in Visalia and Cairo, while boxwoods and Japanese maples, for instance, are from Dayton.“People are surprised at the scale of commercial growers when they know about it,” she said. “Many think local nurseries grow their own plants.”The meticulously cared for field/greenhouse plants of all the commercial growers, which generally are not open to the public, paint the fields in brightly colorful hues, much like what Mother Nature is doing naturally with expanses of wildflowers. Many of the commercially grown plants, though, are shielded from the humidity and heat or the cold and frost.The plant/horticulture industry is much the same as any other: Name recognition and reliability are key elements of success an... (LA Daily News)

Apr 7, 2017

This week's Tulip Festival events | Entertainment | goskagit.com

Vernon: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, later if weather permits. Gardens, flowers, gifts and more. $7, free for ages 6 and younger. No pets. 360-424-8152.Azusa Farm and Gardens, 14904 Highway 20, Mount Vernon: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Display gardens, plants, flowers, art and more. 360-424-1580.AdvertisementChristianson’s Nursery, 15806 Best Road, Mount Vernon: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily. Gardens, greenhouses, plants, art and more. 360-466-3821.Skagit Valley Gardens, 18923 Peter Johnson Road, Mount Vernon: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Gardens, plants, gifts, cafe and more. 360-424-6760.WSU Discovery Garden, 16650 Highway 536, Mount Vernon: Dawn to dusk daily. Gardens showcasing plants that do well in the Pacific Northwest. Docents on hand to answer gardening questions on the weekends.FIRST THURSDAY ART WALKApril 6: The Mount Vernon Downtown Association kicks off the fourth season of First Thursday Art Walks from 5 to 8 p.m. Visit 14 locations exhibiting original works by local and regional artists. Featured artists Maria Wickwire and Dee Doyle will present “Figures and Faces — Private Scenes and Brilliant Dreams” at the Front Gallery, 420 Myrtle St. A group show, “Color Theory-Contemorary Abstraction” will be featured at Perry and Carlson, 508 S. First St. Free. 360-336-3801.REXVILLE GRANGE ART SHOWApril 6-9: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Rexville Grange, 19299 Rexville Grange Road, Mount Ver... (goskagit.com)

Jan 8, 2016

James W Jenson III

Idaho on March 27, 1944 to James William Jenson Jr. and Dorothea Crowell. His family moved to So. California when he was a toddler and lived in Azusa and then Glendora. As a boy he loved exploring the mountains near his home. Jim served a 2 year mission to the land of his ancestors- Sweden. His love for the country and the Swedish people remained in his heart the rest of his life. Jim married his beloved Sandy Tipton on March 29, 1969 in the Los Angeles LDS temple. Their love story is nothing short of amazing! They have 5 children, Jim (Kerrie), Rebecca (deceased), Steve (Mindi), Dave (Tina), and Jeff (Steph). He so loved being a grandpa to 14 grandchildren and considered it to be the best time of his life. Jim was a faithful and committed member of the LDS church. He understood the doctrine, loved the scriptures and was a talented teacher and an inspired leader. His family and his faith were the most important things in his life. Jim meant so much to so many. We will miss his wisdom, his wonderful talent to fix and build virtually anything, his warm and comforting conversations and his unqualified love for us all. He is survived by his wife, 4 sons and their lovely wives, grandchildren, 2 sisters and a large extended family. He was joyfully greeted in heaven by his only daughter,... (Daily Herald)