Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Florists in Bentonville, AR

Find local Bentonville, Arkansas florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Bentonville and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Bentonville Flower Shops

Bloom Floral & Gifts

3316 SW I Street
Bentonville, AR 72712
(479) 273-1190

Matkin's Flowers & Greenhouse

205 Sw 3Rd St
Bentonville, AR 72712
(479) 273-2692

Bentonville AR News

Nov 9, 2019

Business Spotlight: Blooming Business - Springfield Business Journal

Springfield in 2018. Owner Eden Garrett earlier this year moved the business to Arkansas, where the flower truck serves the Bentonville and Rogers areas. Hartman says she’s starting to see the trend grow nationally. “Since we’ve started, I’ve seen more pop up across the country,” Hartman says. “I still get emails pretty frequently asking how to start a flower truck, and the whole concept is gaining momentum.” Kate Penn, CEO of the Society of American Florists, says retail floral sales have been growing – to the tune of $35 billion in 2017, a $2 billion increase from the year prior, according to a U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis report on personal consumption expenditures. Penn says the mobile floral business is catching on, and she describes it as “experiential, interactive purchasing.” “There’s a lot of innovation and entrepreneurialism in the flower-buying space right now,” Penn says, noting floral sales have steadily increased during the last decade. “There is a big trend across retail right now, and the floral industry is no different. It’s the idea of trying to do something creative that makes what you’re purchasing interactive and memorable and fun.” The consumer appeal, she says, is being able to walk down the street, stop at a flower truck and purchase flowers by the stem, or create an individual bouquet. “It’s a super smart business model,” Penn says. ...

Nov 24, 2016

Wal-Mart kicks off Cyber Monday on Friday

Thanksgiving. And they're now offering many of the same deals online as they do in stores on Thanksgiving. This year, Wal-Mart, based in Bentonville, Arkansas, is making Thanksgiving deals available online at 12:01 a.m. EST on the holiday, three hours earlier than last year. Wal-Mart is starting its deals at its stores at 6 p.m. on the turkey feast, the same time as last year. Ravi Jariwala, a Wal-Mart spokesman, told The Associated Press that three out of the four customers it polled said that they wanted to shop Cyber Monday deals earlier - after the kickoff in stores. The move comes as Wal-Mart aims to compete more aggressively with online leader Amazon.com. Wal-Mart reported last week that its online sales growth accelerated to 20.6 percent in the third quarter from its 11.8 percent pace in the prior quarter. Wal-Mart's online business has been helped in part by its growth in product assortment. It now offers 23 million products online, nearly triple from last year's holiday shopping season. ComScore predicts online spending on Cyber Monday will jump to $3.5 billion from $3.12 billion last year. The firm's preliminary holiday shopping forecast is for online sales to rise as much as 19 percent to $81 billion. Aside from a dip the day after the contentious presidential election, there are no signs that shoppers' appetite for spending has been seriously weakened, said comScore analyst Andrew Lipsman. Another firm, Adobe Digital Insights, forecasts online sales will be up 11 percent to $91.6 billion this holiday season. --- Follow Anne D'Innocenzio: http://twitter.com/ADInnocenzio © 2016 Cox Media Group. (WPXI Pittsburgh)

Apr 22, 2016

Weekend Calendar

Hours: 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Saturday. Admission $8. (479) 444-0066. CRYSTAL BRIDGES MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART 600 Museum Way, Bentonville. "The Open Road: Photography and the American Road Trip," through May 30. Demonstrations, classes, art talks. Hours: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday, Saturday-Sunday; 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Wednesday-Friday. crystalbridges.org or (479) 418-5700. DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST through Friday, Integrity First Bank, 502 Hickory St., Mountain Home, hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday; Monday-May 13, First Integrity Bank, 2696 U.S. 62, Mountain Home. Hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-noon Saturday. (870) 508-6149. FORT SMITH MUSEUM OF HISTORY 320 Rogers Ave., Fort Smith. Steel Horse Motorcycle Rally events, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. April 30. "Motorcycle Memories" exhibit, Gen. William O. Darby, April 29-30. Alphonso Trent documentary Alphonso's Gold, various times April 29-30."Roots, Rhythm and Rock -- Music That Moved Fort Smith: Part I 1880-1945," through May 28. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. Admission: $7, ages 6-16 $2. fortsmithmuseum.org or (479) 783-7841. GARVAN WOODLAND GARDENS 550 Arkridge Road, Hot Springs. "Fabulous Fibers," Darlene Garstecki, through April 30. "Enchanted Forest: An Art Installation," W. Gary Smith, Monday-April 29. Hours: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Admission: $15, children 6-12 $5. (501) 262-9606. JUSTUS FINE ART GALLERY 827-A Central Ave., Hot Springs. Works by Taimur Cleary, Beverly Buys, Rebecca Thompson, through Monday. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday-Friday and by appointment. (501) 321-2335. MUSEUM OF NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY 202 S.W. O St., Bentonville. "The Jim and Nancy Blair Meso-American Art Collection," continuing. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Saturday. (479) 273-2456. NORTH CENTRAL ARKANSAS ART GALLERY Fairfield Bay Conference Center, 110 Lost Creek Parkway, Fairfield Bay. New artworks by painters, sculptors, photographers, potters, stained-glass artists. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday. (501) 680-2741. OUACHITA BAPTIST UNIVERSITY 410 Ouachita St., Arkadelphia. "It's Complicated," Perri Adcock and Lauren Scarbrough, Monday-May 6; reception, 7 p.m. April 29. Hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Fr... (Arkansas Online)

Apr 1, 2016

Planting The Seed

Yin and yang. Old and new. The mother tree and the seedling. Pa Lao arranges flowers at her family's booth at the Bentonville Farmers Market last year. (By: Flip Putthoff) (Credit: NWA Democrat-Gazette) Yer Vang of Colcord, Okla., helps a customer at the Rogers Farmers Market. The summer market opens April 30 at the Frisco Sta... (By: Jason Ivester) (Credit: NWA Democrat-Gazette) Carrots from NWA Natural Produce in Lincoln are on display at the Fayetteville Farmers’ Market Winter Market, which ended Mar... (By: Andy Shupe) (Credit: NWA Democrat-Gazette file photo) Amy Edie of Fayetteville works on an animal portrait last year at the Fayetteville Farmers’ Market. The eclectic mix of food ... (By: David Gottschalk) (Credit: NWA Democrat-Gazette file photo) There's a new kid in town, but the grand dame of Northwest Arkansas farmers markets is alive and well, too. FYI All the Markets We Could Find Bella Vista Bella Vista Farmers Market — 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sundays starting April 17 at Mercy Medical. bellavistaar.gov/farmers-market or (479) 936-6314. Bentonville Downtown Bentonville Market — 7:3... (NWAOnline)

Feb 3, 2016

Joplin accident prompts victim's mom to seek tougher hit-and-run laws

Neosho High School graduate, had lived in Neosho since 2008. In March 2015, Stacey Stevens started splitting her time between Neosho and Bentonville, Arkansas, where she now lives full time. She wanted Matthew to move to Bentonville with her, but he decided to stay. Neosho was his home, and he wanted to be where his friends lived. His Asperger's syndrome made transitions difficult for him, she said. Matthew spent much of his time staying with friends. Not long before the accident, he told his mother that he was trying to enroll at Crowder College and was thinking about living in campus housing. He'd struck up a deal with his mom to start looking at Job Corps if he didn't enroll in college or find a job soon. A friend was trying to help him get a job at Wendy's. He also had a girlfriend. "He was looking forward to a future," Stevens said. "He was looking forward to, 'Hey, I'm going to start college.' He should have been starting college now." The night he was killed, Matthew had been walking into town after seeing his girlfriend, who lived in Crowder student housing, she said. Following the accident, Matthew's family was out in force putting out fliers and urging people to come forward with information. Almost two weeks later, Neosho police announced that investigators had seized a 2001 Ford Escape with extensive front-end damage. Sixty-one-year-old Oren R. Rinehart of Neosho was charged with a felony count of leaving the scene of an accident. According to a probable-cause statement, Rinehart allegedly admitted to hitting Matthew Stevens on his way home but told investigators he thought he hit a deer, and so he continued on. He later turned himself in to authorities, according to the statement. Multiple messages left for Rinehart at work and with his attorney to get their version of events and the explanation for why Rinehart turned himself in were not returned. A preliminary hearing is scheduled for Monday. Under Missouri law, leaving the scene of an accident is a class D felony if the accident results in physical injury to another person or causes more than $1,000 in property damage. Otherwise, leaving the scene of an accident is a misdemeanor. A class D felony is currently the lowest level of felony in Missouri, and a conviction carries a punishment of up to four years in prison and a fine of up to $5,000 or a combination of those, said Newton County Prosecuting Attorney Jake Skouby. New laws taking effect in 2017 will change some of the language in the statute, but if the accident results in physical injury, the maximum amount of time a person could spend in prison if he or she is convicted of leaving the scene would still be four years. A charge of leaving the scene deals specifically with the act of leaving the site, but not with any evidence that might exist as to how and why the accident happened, Skouby said. He said authorities still don't know the circumstances surrounding Matthew's death, he said. In that case, Rinehart was charged with leaving the scene of the accident because it's... (Columbia Missourian)

Feb 2, 2016

Real Estate Transactions: Feb. 2

Richard Bruce Williford, Susan G. Williford, Regina Ruth Williford Lee and T.W. Lee to John Rodney Long Sr. and Christina M. Ezzell, 0.5 acres in Bentonville Township, $8,500. Habitat for Humanity of Johnston County Inc. to Alicia Carlson, 0.146 acres in Selma Township, $100,000. Reba Cushing, et al, to Mark Titlon Godwin and Lora E. Godwin, 47.25 acres, $85,000. Ercell B. Lee to Kenneth Earl Lee and Darlene B. Lee, tracts in Bentonville Township, $16,500. Ercell B. Lee to Janice L. Gregory Joseph C. Gregory, tracts in Bentonville Township, $16,500. Walter A. Goebel and Julia Santiago, agent, to Marcos Alfonso Puga Holguin, Lot 110 in Grovewood subdivision, $109,000. Francis Steinbach and Mary Steinbach to Hillary Blizzard, Christopher Cohrs and Walter Blizzard, Lot 77 in Country Estates subdivision, $105,000. Scott D. Nicol and Angela B. Nicol to Anna Alencio-Comar, tracts, $50,000. Georgianna M. Petrilli to Michelle Alligood Fore, Lot 3261 in Riverwood Athletic Club subdivision, $196,000. William H. Richards Jr. and Mandy L. Richards to Stephanie Anne Thompson and Rory Drew Murphy, Lot 554 in South Plantation subdivision, $128,500. Anne Mundinger to Deborah S. Wilson and Frederick P. Panasci, Lot 5 in Drayton Downs subdivision, $216,000. U.S. Secretary of Agriculture to Roger C. Peterson, Lot 78 in Glen Haven subdivision, $84,000. Heather Rhodes Pope and Patrick W. Pope to Tiffany Nicole Hicks and Stephanie Sue Pierce, Lot 13 in The Highlands of Middle Creek subdivision, $118,000. Richard V. Kujawa and Leslie M. Kujawa to Michelle Clark and Gregory M. Clark, Lot 3 in Jones Homestead subdivision, $187,500. Clayton Community Church to Discovery Church, 4.763 acres, $625,000. Paradise Homes of Johnston County to David D. Smith and Nina L. Smith, Lot 17 in Ridgewood subdivision, $73,000. M&N Rentals, et al, to Wesley B. Heflin, one tract, $85,000. The Three J’s Inc. Highway Investors LLC to Tonya Best Lee, Lot 40 in Lakeview Estates subdivision, $41,500. Richard P. Anderson Jr. and Samantha Hardison to IH6 Property North Carolina, Lot 264 in Cobblestone Village subdivision, $161,500. Cumberland Homes Inc. to Donna Ann Loverdi, Lot 8 in Carsons Creek subdivision, $264,500. Legacy Custom Homes Inc. to Rodney J. Alsop and Alice M. Alsop, Lot 52 in Taft Woods East subdivision, $385,000. Gary Bragg and Samantha Jo Frame to Crystal Lynn Morgan, tract in Boon Hill Township, $98,000. Kenny Justice and Sunshine May Justice to George David Smith II, Lot 3 in Fox Ridge Estates subdivision, $259,500. Gray Wolf Development LLC to Frances A. Pope Sr. and Diane M. Pope, one lot, $275,000. Frank Gaddy III and Caroline Gaddy to Scott Fuller, Lot 29 in North Farm subdivision, $183,000. Inland Builders LLC to John M Kozlowski and Stacy Kozlowski, Lot 55 in Broadmoor West subdivision, Cleveland Township, $520,000. Janet B. Anderson, trustee of the Janet Anderson Revocable Living Trust, to Brandon Boggs and David Boggs, 0.378 acres in Selma Township, $104,000. Edward N. Byrd II to Richard P. O’Connor, Lot 58 in Lockwood Forest subdivision, $115,500. Letchworth Land Co. LLC to Veronelli Homes Inc., Lot 16 in Glen Iris subdivision, $21,000. Sherrie Clayton Shears to CMH Homes Inc., lot on Medlin Road, $18,000. FSC III LLC to RMS Investments LLC, two lots in Riverwood Athletic Club’s Deer Valley subdivision, Wil... (News & Observer)