Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Arkansas, AR Florists

Find florist in Arkansas state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a Arkansas city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

Arkansas Cities

Arkansas State Featured Florists

Greenwood Flowers And Gift

510 W Center St
Greenwood, AR 72936

Mount Ida Floral

106 W Elm St
Mount Ida, AR 71957

Lyon Florist

305 N. Myrtle St
Warren, AR 71671

R C Floral

2210 Greensboro Road
Jonesboro, AR 72401

Karen's Flower Shop

10 SW Front Street
Hoxie, AR 72433

Arkansas Flowers News

Jan 4, 2020

Breaking ground: Warm winter has landscape plants confused - NWAOnline

IVE PLANT OF THE MONTH Possum-haw is just one of the common names for deciduous holly. There are two species of deciduous hollies that are native in Arkansas — Ilex decidua is commonly called possum-haw, and Ilex verticillata is commonly called winterberry. These common names are often used for either plant. Both are beautiful and can add color to the winter landscape. They have separate male and female plants. The female plants are covered in red or orange berries in the winter. While only the female plants produce fruit, a male holly is needed for pollination. 'Sparkleberry' is a variety of deciduous holly. (Special to the Democrat-Gazette/Janet B. Carson) Typically, there are plenty of hollies in landscapes with male plants that can aid in pollination. Ilex verticillata will produce better berries if you plant a male cultivar in with the females. Some that are usually readily available: • Females — 'Sparkleberry,' 'Red Sprite,' 'Winter Red' and 'Winter Gold.' • Male cultivars are 'Jim Dandy,' 'Apollo' and 'Southern Gentleman.' For the Ilex decidua plants, the most commonly sold variety is 'Warren's Red' for the female and 'Red Escort' for the male plant. Usually one male plant is all that is needed to pollinate four or five female plants. Deciduous hollies make excellent large bushes or small trees in the sunny landscape. They have nice green foliage during the growing season, but the females shine in the winter landscape when the leaves drop to allow the fruits to show their full glory. The berries are an important food source for many birds. Full sun is best, but with at least six hours of sun they can set fruit. They appreciate some added water during extended dry periods. Deciduous hollies are native to Arkansas. (Special to the Democrat-Gazette/Janet B. Carson) Read Janet Carson's blog at arkansasonline.com/planitjanet. HomeStyle on 01/04/2020 ...

Nov 9, 2019

Business Spotlight: Blooming Business - Springfield Business Journal

Eden’s Flower Truck, a similar business concept, launched in Springfield in 2018. Owner Eden Garrett earlier this year moved the business to Arkansas, where the flower truck serves the Bentonville and Rogers areas. Hartman says she’s starting to see the trend grow nationally. “Since we’ve started, I’ve seen more pop up across the country,” Hartman says. “I still get emails pretty frequently asking how to start a flower truck, and the whole concept is gaining momentum.” Kate Penn, CEO of the Society of American Florists, says retail floral sales have been growing – to the tune of $35 billion in 2017, a $2 billion increase from the year prior, according to a U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis report on personal consumption expenditures. Penn says the mobile floral business is catching on, and she describes it as “experiential, interactive purchasing.” “There’s a lot of innovation and entrepreneurialism in the flower-buying space right now,” Penn says, noting floral sales have steadily increased during the last decade. “There is a big trend across retail right now, and the floral industry is no different. It’s the idea of trying to do something creative that makes what you’re purchasing interactive and memorable and fun.” The consumer appeal, she says, is being able to walk down the street, stop at a flower truck and purchase flowers by the stem, or create an individual bouquet. “It’s a super smart business model,” Penn says. ...

Oct 10, 2019

REX NELSON: Selling flowers since 1886 - NWAOnline

Ecuador, and they're filled with fresh flowers. I'm being given a tour of the building by Howard Hurst, the president of Tipton & Hurst, one of Arkansas' oldest family-owned businesses. "There's a jewelry store in Camden that's older than we are [Stinson's Jewelers, founded in 1850], but that's about it as far as retailers go," Hurst says. "Our business started on Main Street in 1886." Howard's grandfather, Joe Hurst Sr., was born in England in 1859 and raised in Scotland. He came to this country at age 18 to work on railroads and wound up in Little Rock, where he entered into a partnership with flower-grower David Tipton. In a box on his desk, Howard Hurst has the original partnership documents. For years, the company had greenhouses at 14th and Park near Little Rock Central High School. Those greenhouses can be seen in the background of some of the photos shot during the 1957 Central High School desegregation crisis, which was the biggest news story in the world that fall. "The Tiptons were into growing orchids, which were used frequently by women as corsages," Hurst says. "They would put them on ice and ship them out by rail. They had glass greenhouses." Tipton & Hurst now has almost 30,000 square feet of warehouse space near Ninth and Thayer streets. Hurst says he has a dream of using open property ad...

Sep 19, 2019

In The Garden | Tiger swallowtail butterflies abundant this summer - Mansfield News Journal

Ohio's worst planting season on record. • Other states prevented from planting due to weather include Arkansas, Michigan and Mississippi. • Northwest Ohio was hit hardest for wet fields, namely Fulton and Williams counties. • In Ohio, a total of more than 1.5 million acres that normally would be planted were unplanted this year — a total of 881,000 acres of corn and 599,000 of soybeans. Our hope is we don't get a couple more back-to-back seasons like 2019 We realize there could be more wet seasons ahead, but hope that doesn't happen. Farmers nationwide appreciate all of the support during this tough year. Brain food • The most beautiful flowers grow in rocky soils and crevices. • Humans have one mouth and two ears; there is a message there. Richard Poffenbaugh is a retired biology teacher and active home gardener since 1960. He is a member of the Mansfield Men's Garden Club and was editor of the club newsletter (The Greenhorn) for 21 years. He resides in Ontario with his wife, Barbara. Reach him at 419-529-2966.

Jul 26, 2019

This sunflower field is Alabama’s happy place - AL.com

Todd, who has worked as a truck driver for the past 26 years, remembers being in Arkansas when he got a call from a friend who asked him, “Do you know what’s going on in your sunflower field? They’re everywhere, man!”Every summer since then, people have continued to be everywhere in his breathtakingly beautiful fields filled with 6-foot-tall, scratchy stalks. It’s become a popular place to capture proposals, senior portraits, birthdays and babies – and to pick bouquets to take home. Professional photographers are welcome to do photo shoots in the field for a $20 fee.In addition to the sunflowers, which are sold for $1 each or $10 for a souvenir bucket that holds about 14 stems, the Sheridans also sell homegrown produce at the field – watermelons, cantaloupes, yellow squash, bell peppers, cucumbers and more. They offer T-shirts for $20 and tea towels for $12.Last year, Todd accidentally killed a whole field when he sprayed liquid fertilizer on the blooms. He had to replant, and the next crop bloomed in August. By then, his wife, Kim, was back at work as a school nurse, and most children were back in school, so attendance was down from what it would have been in July.So far, this has been the best summer yet for The Sunflower Field. “This year, we’ve hit all the marks,” he says. “We’ve finally got it figured out.”The flowers bloom for about two weeks at a time, so Todd plants them in two separate fields. The first 18-acre field was in full bloom around the Fourth of July, and the second one, on about 17 acres, opened to the public July 11. He expects the blooms to last through Sunday, July 21.After the sunflowers’ heads hang low, Todd will use a combine to harvest the seeds and bag them for sale to local feed stores as birdseed. And next May, he’ll start the process all over again.The Sunflower Field is located at 3301 Alabama Highway 14 West in Autaugaville. Open daily while blooms last, from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Admission is free, but the farm is cash-only.