Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Wyoming, WY Florists

Find florist in Wyoming state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a Wyoming city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

Wyoming Cities

Wyoming State Featured Florists

The Shoppe Floral & Gift

116 S 6Th St
Thermopolis, WY 82443

Western Bouquet Floral & Greenhouse

114 Barber St
Dubois, WY 82513

Ridley's Family Markets #1131 Floral Mgr

3112 Grand Ave
Laramie, WY 82070

Owlfies Flowers & Gifts

110 Uinta Dr
Green River, WY 82935

Suzens Garden

115 E Ivinson Ave
Laramie, WY 82070

Wyoming Flowers News

Jul 5, 2019

Summer Solstice Marks Beginning Of Fun In Apple Valley-Rosemount - Apple Valley, MN Patch

Native American tribes have long observed the summer solstice, and many continue the rituals today. Tribes in present-day Wyoming constructed a "medicine wheel," a stone wheel with 28 spikes at the top of Bighorn Mountain, to observe the solstice. It was aligned with the sunrise and sunset on the solstice, and is accessible only in the summer months. Similar wheels have been found in South Dakota, Montana and parts of Canada. Another ceremonial ritual is the Sundance, originated by the Sioux tribe in the western and northwestern U.S., because it was believed the sun was a manifestation of the Great Spirit. The four-day celebration of singing, dancing, drumming, prayer and meditation, and skin piercing concluded with a ceremonial felling of a tree, symbolic of the connection between the heavens and Earth. 2. Thousands will gather at Stonehenge, a Neolithic megalith monument in the south of England, to celebrate the summer solstice. Stonehenge, built around 2500 B.C., lines up perfectly with both the summer and winter solstices. There are some conspiracy theories about the formation of rocks — including that Stonehenge was built as a landing zone for alien aircraft, according to Popular Mechanics. A more believable explanation is that Stonehenge was built as an ancient calendar to mark the passing of time. 3. Not all cultures called June 21 the summer solstice and it meant different things to different people. According to History.com, in northern Europe, the longest day of the year was known as Midsummer, while Wiccans and other Negopagan groups called it Litha, and some Christian churches called it St. John's Day in commemoration of the birth of John the Baptist. On ancient Greek calendars, the summer solstice and the beginning of a new year coincided, and it also marked the one-month countdown to the opening of the Olympic games. 4. The summer solstice is steeped in pagan folklore and superstition. According to some accounts, people wore protective garlands of herbs and flowers to ward off evil spirits that appear on the summer solstice. Among the most powerful, according to History.com, was "chase devil," known today as St. John's Wort because of its association with St. John's Day. Lore also holds that bonfires on Midsummer, as the solstice was known among northern Europeans,...

Jul 6, 2018

Gardens run the gamut: 2018 tour features exotics and natives, commercial displays and private retreats

His new garden features the dark-red leaves of Wyoming cannas and the variegated foliage of Stuttgart cannas as well as many unique plants like Ismene (Peruvian daffodil), snaggletooth, pineapple lily, King Tut grass, datura, foxtail lilies, and a double yellow tree peony.Perry uses his cutting garden to create floral bouquets that he shares with others. He added a Montreal rose and a Quebec rose to his rose garden this year. One of his favorite flowers, the Mexican petunia, is flanked by Mexican heather and Mexican hat flowers. Beyond the cutting garden is a deck and terraced steps. The fast-growing "sem" spirea line the steps going to the lower yard and lakeshore. Watch for these potted plants: bougainvillea, gardenia, trumpet flower and voodoo lilies.Bill and Jessie Blanchard1016 Fillmore St.AlexandriaNestled behind a white picket fence, Bill and Jessie have created a retreat filled with native perennials to attract butterflies, hummingbirds and bees. Benary giant zinnias greet visitors on the right as they enter the yard. Some plants are seedlings and may not be blooming yet. Bill and Jessie are participating in the Great Sunflower Project by planting Lemon Queen sunflowers; they then track the number of bees that visit to shed light on the effects of pesticides on pollinators.A new garden area in the backyard includes many pollinator-friendly plants, such as compass plants, royal catchfly, late figwort, sweet black-eyed Susan and giant purple hyssop, as well as coneflowers, lobelia, lupines and several types of native liatris that rabbits and deer won't touch. They have a bee balm garden, a surprise garden and whimsical yard art.Alexandria Golf Club2300 N. Nokomis NEAlexandriaThe Alexandria Golf Club welcomes the public to view its golf course. The club takes great pride in its well-maintained greens, bentgrass fairways, colorful flower beds and lake views. Club members will take visitors out in golf carts to share the beauty of the grounds. The terraced landscaping and flowers by the clubhouse, patio and first tee-box are a "must-see." The clubhouse will be open to anyone interested in buying refreshments or food during the tour.

Nov 2, 2017

ECOVIEWS: State flowers and trees make statements

California and Louisiana are the golden poppy and the magnolia blossom, respectively. The cottonwood is the state tree of Kansas, Nebraska and Wyoming perhaps because the choice of native trees that grow throughout each state is somewhat limited.The official tree of Texas is the pecan. (And, as of 2013, pecan is the official state pie.) For the folks in West Texas, the mesquite tree might have been a more suitable selection. Considering its size, perhaps Texas should have two state trees. The choice of the Texas bluebonnet as the state flower seems a reasonable one.Having a state legislator who is a botanist might be a good idea considering some choices that have been made. Georgia, Vermont and Alabama each picked a non-native species for their state flower. Georgia’s Cherokee rose is no more Cherokee than any other Asian plant that was introduced to the New World in the 1700s. They may be pretty, but they are not native. Cherokee rose is even considered an invasive species in some areas.Vermont, likewise, made the odd choice of red clover as its state flower. Where the first red clover plants introduced to the country came from may be debated, but the origin was certainly Europe, Asia or Africa, not Vermont.Alabama may hold the record for the most perplexing selection of a state flower. In 1959, the legislature replaced goldenrods, beautiful fall-blooming native plants, with camellias. Legend has it that the change was pushed through by garden club ladies who did not think a wild flower should have pride of place.In 1999, legislators specified Camellia japonica as the state flower, thus giving Alabama a pretty Asian bloom as its state symbol. Perhaps in an effort to counter that puzzling decision, at the same time, the oakleaf hydrangea was designated the “official state wildflower.” Goldenrod remains as the state flower o... (The Star)

Oct 19, 2017

Luzerne Borough lauds flower lady

Looking out over the bridge, he said, “This bridge is really a hub, central to many surrounding communities including Wyoming, Forty Fort, Swoyersville and Courtdale.”Keller presented Simonovich with a plaque Saturday, in appreciation of the entire Simonovich family and Bernard Simonovich’s 10 years of service as a councilman.?Ted Ritsick, representing state Rep. Aaron Kaufer, presented a citation to Simonovich from the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, lauding her spirit of service.“Service such as hers is vital to the success of great communities like Luzerne,” said Ritsick.Police Chief Michael Kotwasinski was on hand to direct traffic, delaying a trip to the Bloomsburg Fair when scheduled officers got busy with other duties.“When I became the police chief, I made a commitment to the borough, on and off duty,” he said. “It was a pleasure for me to make it possible for this wonderful resident to be honored.”Rhonda Keller, a borough business owner, thoroughly enjoys the flower display throughout the warmer months.“I go through this intersection a lot, and when I’m at the red light, I just so much enjoy looking at the flowers,” she said. “I think a lot of residents go through here from all over the area and really like it.”Councilwoman Mary Ellen Schell saluted Simonovich’s hard work over many years.“She very much deserves to be recognized,” said Schell.As for Simonovich, ever humble and self-effacing, she simply enjoyed the gathering of over a dozen residents.When asked her secret to growing the flowers that many credited with injecting a bit of joy into their daily lives, she revealed: “Well, last year, we used a lot of Miracle-Gro.”Ted Ritsick, representing state Rep. Aaron Kaufer, presents a citation to Audrey Simonovich on Saturday in honor of her commitment to beautifying a bridge in Luzerne Borough. Longtime Luzerne resident Audrey Simonovich was honored Saturday for her beautification of the borough’s bridge for over 20 years. Mayor James Keller prepares to present Audrey Simonovich with a plaque in honor of her service to the borough by planting flowers along the Luzerne Borough Bridge. (Wilkes Barre Times-Leader)

Sep 22, 2017

Fair teaches lessons about best flowers to grow locally

Monarda (beebalm) entries received red ribbons and only $4 premiums.I chatted with one of the two floriculture judges afterwards. Chris Hilgert, Wyoming Master Gardener coordinator and extension horticulture specialist, explained he thought all the beebalm was a little past its prime.Beebalm flower heads are made up of tiny florets that bloom in groups, one concentric ring at a time. Mine had already been in bloom five weeks. But pansies have no florets, just five petals per flower. Mine have been putting out fresh flowers nearly every day since they started blooming in April.Hilgert has been judging several fairs a year for the last 14 years. He looks for entries that are healthy with no sign of disease or pests. You can pinch off bad leaves, but you can’t remove many bad flower petals without ruining a bloom.The containers don’t matter, Hilgert said, though he prefers that they be a size matching the stem length. He’d rather not fish flowers out of the water when they fall into too tall vases. Our fair’s rules call for clear glass or plastic containers and it doesn’t matter to Hilgert whether they are vases or just jars and bottles.When a class description asks for three stems, or three blooms, the three need to be as uniform as possible: same size flowers, same length stem, and flowers at the same stage of bloom. This year I had a bumper crop of Rudbeckia (gloriosa daisy or black-eyed susan), but only three were identical, and luckily, were fresh enough to last the whole week of the fair.Avoiding wilting, another of Hilgert’s benchmarks, was easy this year – it was a cool, rainy day when we brought our entries to the Exhibition Hall. However, during hot weather, the fair’s rules stating that all open class entries must be turned in between noon and 8 p.m., but not judged until the next morning, doesn’t work well for some tender plants. And it is another day before the public can view them. Volunteers keep the containers of flowers and the potted plants watered during fair week.There is a simple strategy for entering floriculture at our fair. Before the entry deadline at the end of June, put in online for every class for which you have something planted. There is no entry fee. No one can predict what will look best the beginning of August when the flowers need to be picked. While seven people had great Shasta daisy entries this year, mine were already finished blooming. Of the 35 classes I put in for, I only brought 14 entries. I didn’t even have hail damage this year. It was just a matter of bloom timing.There is a competitive aspect to the floriculture department – those other awards that give you bragging rights: Superior, Best of Show, Reserve Champion and Champion. Those are the purple ribbons, some with fancy rosettes, that transcend the classes.This year gardeners were rewarded with them for an exceptional hybrid tea rose, a sunflower, a salpiglossis, two mints, three potted plants and a fairy garden. A truly wonderful flowering tuberous begonia, ent... (Wyoming Tribune)