Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Vermont, VT Florists

Find florist in Vermont state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a Vermont city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

Vermont Cities

Vermont State Featured Florists

Wildflowers Florist And Bee's Hallmark Shop

4574 Main Street
Manchester Center, VT 05255

Valley Flower Company Fax

93 Gates St
White River Junction, VT 05001

The Flower Basket

156 Daniels Rd
Hardwick, VT 05843

Just Because Flowers

11 Liberty St
Bristol, VT 05443

Creative Muse Floral Design

261 Main St
Enosburg Falls, VT 05450

Vermont Flowers News

Aug 17, 2018

Deep field set for Bridge of Flowers 40th anniversary

The third-place finisher from a year ago, Scott Mindel, of Burlington, Vermont, also returns.Rop is a member of the Western Mass. Distance Project, and will have four teammates joining him. One of those is Amos Sang, of Chicopee, who won the 2014 Bridge of Flowers. Sang won the New England 5-mile championship this season with a time of 24:36.Northampton's Ben Groleau, another Western Mass. Distance Project runner, is the UMass record-holder in the mile with a time of 4:01. Groleau was fourth at the New England 5-mile championships in 25:27. Dennis Roche, of Springfield, another WMDP runner, finished fifth last year at the Bridge of Flowers.The women's field will be just as deep. Last year's champion, Holly Rees, of Cambridge, is returning. Rees ran an average of just under 6 minutes a mile in winning the women's crown in 37:05.Rees will be challenged by Semehar Tesfaye, of West Roxbury. Tesfaye won the Bridge of Flowers in 2016 in 39:03.Another major challenger is newcomer Aisling Cuffee, who graduated from Stanford but now lives in North Grafton and runs for Saucony under coach Ray Treacy. Cuffee has a 15:11 personal record in a 5K.The third, fourth and fifth-place finishers from a year ago also return in the women's field. Apryl Sabadosa, of Westfield, took third. Karen Bertasso, of Albany, New York, is a two-time Bridge of Flowers winner. She was fourth last year. The fifth-place finisher from a year ago was Jenna Giglioti, of Northampton, who joins Sabadosa as two of the top female runners in the Western Mass. Distance Project.Another person to keep an eye on is newcomer Kim Nedeau, of Leverett, who is a top hill runner in New England and placed second at the Mount Washington Road Race in 2016.Ashley Krauss, of Easthampton, recently placed eighth at the James Joyce 10K in Dedham, which served as the U.S. championship for the Master's (ages 40-49) Division. Sidney Letendre, of Florence, returns after running an 8:11 pace on the course last season at the age of 62.

May 24, 2018

Brandon remembers: The origins of a Memorial Day tradition

I can't prove it, but it seems very obvious that she would have organized the flower girls." Thornton, whose movie will air Thursday night on Vermont Public Television, said when he moved to Brandon in 2000 he was taken by the town's Memorial Day ceremonies and watched the young girls surrounding the monument with flowers. "It just looked Victorian," he said. He said the earliest proof he can find of the flower girl tradition is 1902, based on Memorial Day programs at the Brandon Historical Society. Knapp, he said, "knew more than anybody." As far as Thornton and Knapp know, the flower girl ceremony is now unique in Vermont, although it may not have always been that way. One photograph of a group of young girls in white, joined by older women in white and boys in suits all standing on the steps of the Brandon Congregational Church, could have been on Memorial Day, Thornton said, but he isn't sure. He said the use of children during Memorial Day ceremonies was common in the late 19th and early 20th century. "It was a Victorian thing to do to use children in a ceremony, and in 1890, as veterans s...

May 24, 2018

The Outside Story: Mountain Laurel Is Special, In Bloom or Not

Lake Sunapee. New Hampshire's Russell-Abbott State Forest, Pisgah State Park, and Wontastaket State Forest have thick stands, as does Vermont's Black Mountain Natural Area. Maine's largest stand is in the Bijhouwer Forest in Phippsburg. Spectacular collections are found at Arnold Arboretum in Jamaica Plain, Mass.Laurie D. Morrissey is a writer in Hopkinton, N.H. The illustration for this column was drawn by Adelaide Tyrol. The Outside Story is assigned and edited byNorthern Woodlandsmagazine: northernwoodlands.org, and sponsored by the Wellborn Ecology Fund of New Hampshire Charitable Foundation: wellborn@nhcf.org.

Jan 26, 2018

Gardening: Flower shows offer spring in deep winter

Hudson Valley Community College. I hope to go. From their photos and write-up, I imagine it will be similar in size and scope to the Vermont Flower Show — which is now an every-other year show, and is not occurring this year.Bangor, Maine, has an annual flower show, though I’ve never attended. This year it will be held in the Alfond Arena in Orono, Maine, on April 20 to 22. If you go, please contact me so I’ll learn more about it.Last year I crossed one more item off my “Bucket List”. My partner Cindy Heath and I flew to London and attended the Chelsea Flower Show. It is in a league by itself, both in size and scope. Mostly outdoors, it includes displays with full-sized trees planted for the week. Under a big tent are displays of flowers of every ilk: hellebores, alliums, iris, narcissus, tulips, vegetables, carnivorous plants and much, much more. To see my article about the show and see a dozen photos, go to dailyuv.com/feed/905682.The Chelsea Show is held this year May 22 to 26. If you plan to go, join the Royal Horticulture Society to get reduced prices and access before the rest of the world (the first two days are just for RHS members). One member can bring in three guests. The Brits love their flowers, and know how to celebrate them. Bring a flowered dress or vest and bowtie, and walk around drinking champagne if you wish — many people do.I called my friend Jill Nooney of Bedrock Gardens in Lee, New Hampshire, to talk about the flower shows. Jill has exhibited at the Boston Show seven times, winning many awards for her garden designs. I asked her, why go to the flower shows? “Nobody can resist the smell of humid mulch-filled air in the middle of March,” she said. I agree. We all need that taste of spring before all the snow has gone.— Henry Homeyer’s blog appears twice a week at dailyuv.com/gardeningguy. Write to him at P.O. Box 364, Cornish Flat, NH 03746. Please include a SASE if you wish a mailed response. Or emailhenry.homeyer@comcast.net. (The Providence Journal)

Nov 2, 2017

ECOVIEWS: State flowers and trees make statements

Having a state legislator who is a botanist might be a good idea considering some choices that have been made. Georgia, Vermont and Alabama each picked a non-native species for their state flower. Georgia’s Cherokee rose is no more Cherokee than any other Asian plant that was introduced to the New World in the 1700s. They may be pretty, but they are not native. Cherokee rose is even considered an invasive species in some areas.Vermont, likewise, made the odd choice of red clover as its state flower. Where the first red clover plants introduced to the country came from may be debated, but the origin was certainly Europe, Asia or Africa, not Vermont.Alabama may hold the record for the most perplexing selection of a state flower. In 1959, the legislature replaced goldenrods, beautiful fall-blooming native plants, with camellias. Legend has it that the change was pushed through by garden club ladies who did not think a wild flower should have pride of place.In 1999, legislators specified Camellia japonica as the state flower, thus giving Alabama a pretty Asian bloom as its state symbol. Perhaps in an effort to counter that puzzling decision, at the same time, the oakleaf hydrangea was designated the “official state wildflower.” Goldenrod remains as the state flower of Kentucky and Nebraska. (Despite a widespread misperception, goldenrod does not cause hay fever. The real culprit is ragweed.)The cabbage palmetto, or sabal palm, would be a distinctive state tree if South Carolina, the Palmetto State, had exclusive rights. But Florida picked the same tree. South Carolina’s state flower, the yellow jessamine (aka jasmine), has a trait to be reckoned with. The vines, roots and trumpet-shaped flowers of the jessamine are packed with strychnine, making them poisonous to ingest. Jessamine is even toxic to some pollinators, including honeybees, which would presumably produce some dangerous honey if that were their primary nectar source.Official recognition of trees and flowers as representative of a state can help increase public awareness of regional plant diversity. The same is true for state animals. Selecting a non-native species as a state symbol undermines that goal. Knowing a state’s wildlife symbols (tree, flower, insect, mammal, fish, etc.) should be a requirement for children in school.Having students learn about their state’s symbols can hav... (The Star)