Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

South Dakota, SD Florists

Find florist in South Dakota state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a South Dakota city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

South Dakota Cities

South Dakota State Featured Florists

Flower Mill

3600 E 10Th St Ste 100Brandon
Sioux Falls, SD 57103

Jenny's Floral

243 Elm St
Hill City, SD 57745

Flowers On Main

513 Main Ave
Brookings, SD 57006

Kris' Floral

410 W Railroad St N
White Lake, SD 57383

Clark Flower & Gift Shop

102 N Commercial St
Clark, SD 57225

South Dakota Flowers News

Aug 22, 2019

Council: Sioux Falls would benefit from hemp, bee-friendly flowers and more cop training - Sioux Falls Argus Leader

The South Dakota Legislature's 2020 to-do list from the Sioux Falls City Council will include legalizing industrial hemp, planting pollinator-friendly plants on state grounds and training more police officers. Each year, councilors establish what are called "legislative priorities" that are sent to state lawmakers as well as the South Dakota Municipal League, the lobby group that works on behalf of South Dakota cities and towns each winter during the legislative session. Many of the 20 items on this year's provisional list (meaning it could be changed ahead of the next session) aren't new ambitions of the city, like the desire to do away with the state's public notice requirement that legal publication be published in newspapers and support for a local tax on alcohol. More: Why lawmakers are frustrated with S.D. officials' lack of hemp research This year, though, councilors through last-minute amendments added three more items to their wish-list: "The City Council supports legislation to legalize the growth, production, and processing of industrial hemp in South Dakota. The Sioux Falls Council supports legislation to increase the student capacity at the South Dakota's Law Enforcement Training facility. The city council supports legislation that promotes pollinator friendly plantings on all state-owned properties and right-of-way.” Hemp and the biotech industry Industrial hemp has been a hot-button topic in South Da...

Aug 22, 2019

Eugene Day Obituary - Pacifica, CA | San Francisco Chronicle - Legacy.com

Cecelia and Gene also remodeled a second home in Ramona, South Dakota (the town where "Celia" was raised) and they spent a good portion of the year there. Gene became not only the "handyman" for the town, but even a bartender when the bartender couldn't make into work.Eugene had a productive life full of love, joy and service to others and he will be missed by the many people whom he has touched. He has chosen to be cremated and buried in Ramona, South Dakota. Services will be held in Pacifica on Saturday, September 7 at 10:30 AM at Saint Peter Parish located at 700 Oddstad Blvd. We welcome all to join the family for a reception directly following services at St. Peter's.In lieu of flowers, Eugene would request that donations in his honor be made to the Rebuilding Together Peninsula 841 Kaynyne St. Redwood City, CA 94065 or Missionary of Charity Gift of Love 160 Milagra Dr. Pacifica, CA 94044...

Jul 26, 2019

Beargrass and yucca: two signature Montana plants - Valleyjournal

Lewis and Clark discovered and named the plant. However, while traveling along the Missouri River above present-day Yankton, South Dakota, in Sept. 2, 1804, Clark’s journal entry mentions seeing “bear grass” (actually yucca) on the dry river plains. In those days, yucca was called beargrass, and since there is a great deal of similarity between the two, it may explain why Lewis and Clark applied the name “beargrass” to the mountain plant when they encountered it in the Rockies. Interestingly, it isn’t a grass and bears won’t touch it, but mountain goats will eat the leaves, and deer, elk and bighorn sheep dine on the blossoms. On the return trip from the Pacific, as the Corps of Discovery neared what would become Montana, they gathered samples of beargrass plants. On June 26, 1806, Lewis wrote: “There is a great abundance of a species of beargrass which grows on every part of these mountains. Its growth is luxuriant and continues green all winter but the horses will not eat it.” During their long winter at Fort Clatsop in Oregon, Lewis noticed the Clatsop Indians making baskets. He recorded: “Their baskets are formed of cedar bark and beargrass so closely interwoven with the fingers that they are watertight without the aid of gum or rosin; some of these are highly ornamented with strans of bear grass, which they dye of several colors and interweave in a great variety of figures; this serves them the double purpose of holding their water or wearing on their heads.” It is for the construction of these baskets that the beargrass becomes an article of traffic among the natives. This grass grows only on their high mountains near the snowy region: “The young blades, which are white from not being exposed to the sun or air, are those most commonly employed, particularly in their neatest work.” Of the beargrass samples collected on the expedition, two still exist: one at the Lewis and Clark Herbarium and the other at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew near London. Also called “soapweed,” “Spanish bayonet” and, as we have just learned, “beargrass,” yucca blooms from a low cluster of long, pointed, spikey leaves. During the growing season, a tall stalk will emerge and produce large numbers (10 to 15) of substantial, 2.5-inch-long, greenish-white, bell-shaped flowers...

Jul 5, 2019

Summer Solstice Marks Beginning Of Fun In Apple Valley-Rosemount - Apple Valley, MN Patch

It was aligned with the sunrise and sunset on the solstice, and is accessible only in the summer months. Similar wheels have been found in South Dakota, Montana and parts of Canada. Another ceremonial ritual is the Sundance, originated by the Sioux tribe in the western and northwestern U.S., because it was believed the sun was a manifestation of the Great Spirit. The four-day celebration of singing, dancing, drumming, prayer and meditation, and skin piercing concluded with a ceremonial felling of a tree, symbolic of the connection between the heavens and Earth. 2. Thousands will gather at Stonehenge, a Neolithic megalith monument in the south of England, to celebrate the summer solstice. Stonehenge, built around 2500 B.C., lines up perfectly with both the summer and winter solstices. There are some conspiracy theories about the formation of rocks — including that Stonehenge was built as a landing zone for alien aircraft, according to Popular Mechanics. A more believable explanation is that Stonehenge was built as an ancient calendar to mark the passing of time. 3. Not all cultures called June 21 the summer solstice and it meant different things to different people. According to History.com, in northern Europe, the longest day of the year was known as Midsummer, while Wiccans and other Negopagan groups called it Litha, and some Christian churches called it St. John's Day in commemoration of the birth of John the Baptist. On ancient Greek calendars, the summer solstice and the beginning of a new year coincided, and it also marked the one-month countdown to the opening of the Olympic games. 4. The summer solstice is steeped in pagan folklore and superstition. According to some accounts, people wore protective garlands of herbs and flowers to ward off evil spirits that appear on the summer solstice. Among the most powerful, according to History.com, was "chase devil," known today as St. John's Wort because of its association with St. John's Day. Lore also holds that bonfires on Midsummer, as the solstice was known among northern Europeans, would banish demons and evil spirits and lead young maidens to their future husbands. Also, the ashes from a summer solstice bonfires not only protected people against misfortune, but also carried the promise of a bountiful harvest. 5. June 21 marks the beginning of winter in the Southern Hemisphere. The forecast high temperature for the first day of winter in Esperanza, located on the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula (the coldest place on Earth), is 8 degrees, with a low of minus 3. However, at the height of summer ...

Jun 22, 2019

Door to Nature: Thimbleberry Flowers and Fruit - Door County Pulse

It actually ranges from the Bruce Peninsula in Ontario, across the upper Great Lakes region to southern Alaska, into the Black Hills of South Dakota and south to the mountains of Mexico, Arizona and California. There is little doubt in my mind that this sought-after fruit is at its very best in lands bordering the upper Great Lakes. The growing conditions in northeastern Wisconsin – always near the cool Lake Michigan shore, but away from the water’s edge – are similar to those encountered at a specific altitude on the wooded mountain slopes of the West. Perhaps no plant genus – other than the Crataegus (thornapple) genus – is in such a chaotic condition as the Rubus when it comes to Latin names and identities. The genus has 250 to 700 species! The outstanding thimbleberry is one of the well-proven and studied species. One place to admire them is along the roads bordering Lake Michigan northeast of Sturgeon Bay. Their large, five-petaled blossoms remind me of a single white rose set against handsome, deep-green leaves that are very slightly tacky to the touch and impart a clean, subtle perfume to the surrounding air. This would be my idea for a can of air freshener: clean, invigorating, but not overpowering or artificial. What a pleasure it is to carefully walk through a patch of thimbleberries as you pick the fruit: no thorns! You don’t have to wear a suit of armor as when picking blackberries, when you earn every berry plucked off those thorny canes. Prepare yourself for some slow pail-filling when you go in search of thimbleberries. Then line your pail with several of the huge plant leaves to cushion the delicate fruit as you put it into the container. Walk slowly and carefully because the huge, dense foliage tends to hide fallen logs. I remember going to pick some thimbleberries one mid-morning during the dry summer of 1976. I was going through the rocky south point of Baileys Harbor with a plastic ice cream pail and had picked enough berries to cover its bottom when I looked at my watch. Holy cow! It was time to get home to make Roy his lunch. I hastened back to my car, and as I did, I tripped over a fallen tree, spilling all of my fruit onto the rough, rocky ground. That was it for my thimbleberry harvest that summer. Thimbleberries tend to flatten when picked, and it’s important to pick them clean because it’s very dif...