Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

South Carolina, SC Florists

Find florist in South Carolina state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a South Carolina city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

South Carolina Cities

South Carolina State Featured Florists

Flower & Gifts

4240 Us Highway 378 W
Mc Cormick, SC 29835

Savvy's Flower Cabin

107 E Broad St
Iva, SC 29655

Greenwood Flower Market

220 N Creek Blvd
Greenwood, SC 29649

Darlington Florist

222 W Broad St
Darlington, SC 29532

Ozzie's At The Rustic Market

433 N. Guignard Dr
Sumter, SC 29150

South Carolina Flowers News

Jul 26, 2019

The heat wave is causing sunflowers to bloom early - CNN

Just because a few fields have bloomed early doesn't mean the season is completely out of whack. Mark Carroll, a biologist with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, says it all depends on when the flowers are planted. "Sometimes, I can barely get any work done, there are so many people calling, wanting to come and look at them," he said. "Eventually, I put a message on the answering machine, letting people know when they were going to bloom." "That's when they're starting to dry out and drop seeds for wildlife to eat," Carroll explains. "The seeds attract mourning doves just in time for the public hunting season."There is something very metal about a field of sunflowers transforming into a reaping ground for doves, but save those thoughts for your next Instagram post. A social media hit CNN Travel's Richard Quest takes an insider look at Amsterdam's favorite flower.Speaking of Instagram, it's no wonder that the image-conscious side of social media has taken a shine to the sunflower. Dave Diggs, owner of the Sunflower Garden in Westminster, Maryland, says he thinks Facebook and Instagram have helped catch people's interest and sustain a unique fascination with the bloom. "The sunflower is certainly a hot flower this year, and it has been for a while, perhaps more than any other flower I can recall," he said. Diggs says that sunflowers are affected by the heat, and it could definitely make them bloom sooner. But places like the Sunflower Garden plant several times a season, so a premature bloom isn't really that big of a deal. "However, we did have a cooler spring than normal," he said, "So that definitely slowed things down at first." It's not just the temperatures the sunflowers are susceptible to; they really do "follow the sun" throughout the day. Scientists have settled on a few reasons and mechanisms for this behavior. Is it so you'll always be in good lighting for your Instagram pics? No, but you're free to believe that if you want.

Jul 5, 2019

Washington M. Flowers, 76 - Port City Daily

LONGWOOD — The Rev. Washington M. Flowers, 76, died Monday, June 24, 2019, at Conway Medical Center in Conway, South Carolina.The Rev. Washington Flowers is survived by his wife, Margaret E. Flowers; three children, Evangelist Larondi Nicole Flowers, Nekeshia Flowers of Baltimore, Maryland, and Washington M. Flowers Jr. of Los Angeles, California; one grandson, Jeremy Flowers; four brothers, William Flowers, Dr. Ernest Flowers, the Rev. Sam E. Flowers and Pastor David Flowers Sr.; five sisters, Ms. Christine Flowers, Ms. Clydell Bellamy, Ms. Rochelle Patterson, Ms. Juanita Smith and Pastor Eva Bellamy. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m., Saturday, June 29, at Ocean View Baptist Association Center, 7550 Ocean Highway West, Sunset Beach. Burial will follow in Flowers Cemetery, Longwood. Viewing will be held from 4 to 6 p.m., Friday, June 28, at t...

May 31, 2019

Slow Flowers Announces 2019 American Flowers Week - PerishableNews

LLCOREGON: Beth Syphers, Crowley House Flower Farm (floral design), with flowers provided by Bethany and Charles Little, Charles Little & Co. SOUTH CAROLINA: Toni Reale, Roadside Blooms (floral design), with flowers provided by Laura Mewbourn, Feast & Flora Farm WASHINGTON: Tammy Myers, First & Bloom (floral design), with flowers supplied by Amy Brown, Laughing Goat Farm and Seattle Wholesale Growers Market Images for all of these looks and links to the creative teams are available at American Flowers Week Press Page (americanflowersweek.com) MORE ABOUT AMERICAN FLOWERS WEEKHeld in the heart of American Flowers Week, the third annual Slow Flowers Summit takes place on July 1 and 2, 2019, at the Paikka Event Space in St. Paul, Minnesota. Developed to stimulate new, sustainable practices in floral design and growing, the Summit and features flower farm tours, a farm-to-table dinner on a flower farm, presentations on floral design, best business practices, industry innovations and an interactive floral installation for all participants. Details are available at SlowFlowersSummit.com. American Flowers Week receives sponsorship from Syndicate Sales, Johnny’s Selected Seeds, Longfield Gardens, Mayesh Wholesale Florist, Seattle Wholesale Growers Market, the Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers, and Florists’ Review magazine. American Flowers Week supporters can find more information and resources at americanflowersweek.com. Downloadable fact sheets, infographics and 2019 American Flowers Week logo and social media badges are available for growers and florists to use for marketing and promotion efforts. Participants are encouraged to use the social media tag #Americanflowersweek to help spread the word about this campaign across all platforms. ### About American Flowers Week: American Flowers Week is designed to engage the public, policymakers and the media in a conversation about the origins of their flowers. As an advocacy effort, the campaign coincides with America’s Independence Day on July 4th, providing florists, retailers, wholesalers and flower farmers a patriotic opportunity to promote American grown flowers.About Debra Prinzing: Debra Prinzing is a Seattle-based writer, speaker and leading advocate for American Grown Flowers. Through her many Slow Flowers-branded projects, she has convened a national conversation that stimulates consumers and professionals alike to make conscious choices about their floral purchases. Debra is the producer of SlowFlowers.com, the online directory to American grown farms, florists, shops and studios who supply domestic and local flowers. Each Wednesday, approximately 2,500 listeners tune into Debra’s “Slow Flowers Podcast,” available for free downloads at her web site, debraprinzing.com, or on iTunes and via other podcast services. She is the author of 10 books, including Slow Flowers and The 50 Mile Bouquet. ...

Mar 29, 2019

Azalea Park: History in bloom | Community News - Journalscene.com

Sunday afternoons. They came because of the beauty, but also because the flowers were so uncommon. At that time azaleas were relatively unknown in South Carolina, except in this area.Summerville youth, including our late and longest serving mayor, Berlin G. Myers, stood beside the town arch, formerly on Main Street at Highway 78 or at Town Hall and offered themselves as guides. The boys hopped on car running boards and directed drivers through the park and at residential gardens overflowing with azaleas. Mayor Myers said he sometimes got as much as a $5 tip – “a real fortune to a young boy in those days.”As residents we get to enjoy the flowers from their first bloom, and then share them with tourists who now come to Summerville annually by the thousands to enjoy one of the most notable events of the spring, the much vaunted Flowertown Festival, centered in the park. This year thousands of tourists will be here April 5-7, for the 46th year, to enjoy food, arts and crafts.This festival by the way, was the brain child of local artists who initially envisioned an art show and displayed their works leaning against bushes. That first year it rained and they lost money. Many people scoffed at the idea and said it would never work.Right!Barbara Hill is a local historian and former reporter for the Summerville Journal Scene. .ctct-form-embed.form_7 .ctct-form-defaults {background-color: #f2f2f2; max-width: 660px; margin: 0 auto;} div.ctct-form-embed div.ctct-form-defaults {font: 14px 'Lato', sans-serif; padding: 10px 20px; margin-bottom: 10px; border-radius:0px;} div.ctct-form-embed div.ctct-form-defaults h2.ctct-form-header {font: 18px 'Lato'; border-bottom: solid 1px #cccccc; padding-bottom: 8px;} div.ctct-form-embed div.ctct-form-defaults p.ctct-form-text {font: 14px 'Lato', sans-serif ;} div.ctct-form-embed form.ctct-form-custom div.ctct-form-field {margin: 0 0 12px 0;} div.ctct-form-embed form.ctct-form-custom label.ctct-form-label {margin-bottom: 5px;} div.ctct-form-embed form.ctct-form-custom input.ctct-form-element {height:30px;} div.ctct-form-embed form.ctct-form-custom button.ctct-form-button {padding: 8px;} .ctct-form-embed.form_1 .ctct-form-defaults .ctct-form-header { color: #323232; font-weight: bold; } ...

Mar 29, 2019

3/25, full issue: Environmental leadership, gun reform, spring flowers, more - Charleston Currents

MYSTERY PHOTO: Not for climbing purposes S.C. ENCYCLOPEDIA: Mepkin Abbey CALENDAR: DigSouth to attract 2,000+ to area in April FOCUS FOCUS: South Carolina, Charleston County need environmental leadership By Laura Cantral Trash. Trash has always been a problem, and now that problem is getting even bigger all over the world. Global and local circumstances now mandate that we get creative on how we reckon with waste, including in our own backyard. The New York Times recently reported that recycling efforts across the country are collapsing. For cities and towns, costs to run their recycling programs have skyrocketed after a crash in the global market. Communities used to make money selling cardboard, bottles, and glass, but now they get little or nothing for the material. At times, they even have to pay processors to take it away. Cantral Small towns in Florida have canceled entire curbside pick-up programs. Philadelphia now burns about half of its recyclables, while city residents grow more concerned about air quality. Every plastic bottle dropped in a blue bin at the Memphis airport is thrown away. And in Charleston County, a month of recycling now sits under a tarp at the Bees Ferry Landfill. “There’s no place to send it,” Charleston County Councilman Vic Rawl told a local TV station. Last month, the county chose not to extend its contract with Horry County and truck recyclables north. An existing facility located on the peninsula is outdated and ill-equipped to manage our pace and volume. Plans to build a more modern facility are on-hold. So, a covered pile of about 3,000 tons of recycled paper, glass, aluminum and plastic sits and awaits its fate. If pieces of it get wet, they’ll be buried at the landfill just like trash. We need leadership. Charleston County should be transparent about the future of its recyc...