Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

South Carolina, SC Florists

Find florist in South Carolina state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a South Carolina city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

South Carolina Cities

South Carolina State Featured Florists

White House Florist

721 Old Cherokee Road
Lexington, SC 29072

Buds & Blooms, Inc.

2345 Hwy. 9 E
Longs, SC 29568

Jarrett's Jungle/The Enchanted Florist

1621 Sunset Blvd
West Columbia, SC 29169

Budding Creations

124 N Hampton St
Kershaw, SC 29067

M & M Florist & Magnolia Tea Room

305 1/2 N Logan St
Gaffney, SC 29341

South Carolina Flowers News

Dec 29, 2017

Late-blooming Bulls persevere

The Bulls, who are 21-4 the past two seasons, won last year’s Birmingham Bowl on Flowers’ 25-yard touchdown pass in overtime against South Carolina.The Red Raiders (6-7) had taken the lead back with Nic Shimonek’s 25-yard touchdown pass to a wide-open T.J. Vasher in the end zone with 1:31 remaining. That left Flowers with plenty of time to work, it turns out. He ran 13 yards and 21 yards for first downs, the latter coming on a third-and-10 play. Then he found McCants on their second scoring connection. The senior passed for 311 yards and four touchdowns. He also ran 14 times for 106 yards and a fifth score. Marquez Valdes-Scantling gained 133 yards on three catches.Shimonek took Texas Tech across midfield in the final seconds, but his desperation pass on the run was completed well short of the end zone.Shimonek, who had led a fourth-quarter comeback in the regular-season finale against Texas, completed 32 of 59 passes for 416 yards. This time the Red Raiders couldn’t seal the deal.“That’s really exactly what was going through my mind,” Shimonek said. “It was almost the same exact type scenario (as Texas).”He threw for three touchdowns and was intercepted twice on deflected balls.Keke Coutee had 11 catches for 187 yards and a touchdown while Justin Stockton ran for 103 yards.The Red Raiders set up two touchdowns in the third quarter off fumble recoveries, taking a 24-17 lead. The defense helped preserve the lead with a pair of fourth down stops, including a goal line stand. Quentin Yontz stuffed Darius Tice from inside the 1 early in the fourth, but Flowers wound up getting the ball back across midfield.He cashed in this time with a 5-yard touchdown run to tie it with 9:30 left.“Defensively, it was stop after stop that we had to go get,” first-year South Florida coach Charlie Strong said.“And even for our offense — they had two turnovers and then (Texas Tech) had two big fourth-down stops — and our offense just continued to play.”Read mor... (The Register-Guard)

Dec 8, 2017

Poinsettia: the Christmas plant

They used the colorful parts as dye for textiles and cosmetics. South Carolina connection In 1825, Joel R. Poinsett, a plantation owner from Charleston, South Carolina, was appointed the first United States ambassador to Mexico. As an amateur botanist, he became enamored with the bright red plant flourishing in the Taxco area. Poinsett sent samples to his plantation in 1828, and began propagating the plants in his greenhouse. Sharing samples with fellow botanists, one made its way to John Bartram of Philadelphia. Bartram gave it to local nurseryman Robert Buist, the first commercial grower to sell it under its botanical name Euphorbia pulcherrima. In1837, the plant was renamed poinsettia to honor the botanist who brought it to the United States. Depending on what part of the world you live in, this plant is also known as Mexican Flame Leaf, Winter Rose, Noche Buena, Crown of the Andes or Atarkur’s Flower. Today, more than 100 varieties of poinsettias are grown. They come in traditional red and white colors, and you’ll also find pink and burgundy poinsettias. Plus, there are marbled and speckled colors available. Color in the leaves Poinsettia's color actually comes from modified leaves called bracts. The plant's insignificant yellow flowers are in the center of the colorful bracts. The bracts’ colors are created through photoperiodism, a process of five days of darkness — 12 hours of darkness each day. Once the color change occurs, the pl... (News - GoUpstate - Spartanburg, SC - Spartanburg Herald Journal)

Nov 2, 2017

ECOVIEWS: State flowers and trees make statements

The real culprit is ragweed.)The cabbage palmetto, or sabal palm, would be a distinctive state tree if South Carolina, the Palmetto State, had exclusive rights. But Florida picked the same tree. South Carolina’s state flower, the yellow jessamine (aka jasmine), has a trait to be reckoned with. The vines, roots and trumpet-shaped flowers of the jessamine are packed with strychnine, making them poisonous to ingest. Jessamine is even toxic to some pollinators, including honeybees, which would presumably produce some dangerous honey if that were their primary nectar source.Official recognition of trees and flowers as representative of a state can help increase public awareness of regional plant diversity. The same is true for state animals. Selecting a non-native species as a state symbol undermines that goal. Knowing a state’s wildlife symbols (tree, flower, insect, mammal, fish, etc.) should be a requirement for children in school.Having students learn about their state’s symbols can have small but positive impacts, both direct and indirect, on attitudes toward the environment. With a little creative thinking in the classroom, enterprising teachers and students in Alabama, Georgia and Vermont might even develop a proposal to change their state flower to a native species and submit it to the state legislature.Send environmental questions to ecoviews@gmail.com.Whit Gibbons is an ecologist and environmental educator with the University of Georgia’s Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Send environmental questions to ecoviews@gmail.com. (The Star)

Sep 22, 2017

MYSTERY PLANT: Southern plant common during autumn

I saw this morning in my backyard starting to pop out of the ground? John Nelson is the curator of the A.C. Moore Herbarium at the University of South Carolina, in the Department of Biological Sciences, Columbia. As a public service, the Herbarium offers free plant identifications. For more information, visit www.herbarium.org, call 803-777-8196 or email nelson@sc.edu.Answer: "Hurricane lily,” Lycoris radiata... (Aiken Standard)

Sep 22, 2017

MYSTERY PLANT: Recognizable wildflower found in many habitats

Like this one.) John Nelson is the curator of the A. C. Moore Herbarium at the University of South Carolina, in the Department of Biological Sciences, Columbia, S.C., 29208. As a public service, the Herbarium offers free plant identifications. For more information, visit www.herbarium.org, call 803-777-8196 or email HYPERLINK "mailto:nelson@sc.edu" nelson@sc.edu.[Answer: “Cardinal flower,” “Red Betty,” Lobelia cardinalis]... (Aiken Standard)