Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Florists in Ambridge, PA

Find local Ambridge, Pennsylvania florists below that deliver beautiful flowers to residences, business, funeral homes and hospitals in Ambridge and surrounding areas. Choose from roses, lilies, tulips, orchids, carnations and more from the variety of flower arrangements in a vase, container or basket. Place your flower delivery order online of call.

Ambridge Flower Shops

Ambridge PA News

Feb 8, 2018

Glass Flowers: Harvard's Museum of Natural History

One needn’t travel to Washington, DC or New York City to experience the wonder that a natural history museum can offer. Right in Cambridge, on a side street near Har­vard University is the Harvard Museum of Na­tural History, an incredibly diverse collection of animals, geology, marine life and more.The museum is very family friendly and offers free admission to teachers and all Massachusetts residents on Sunday mornings from 9 a.m. - noon — a particularly good time to go as it is much easier to snag on-street parking. Regular weekday admission is modest.The museum is probably most famous for its Glass Flowers exhibit. Created by commission in the late 1800s and early 1900s, the Blaschka botanical models were created by a father and son glassmaking team as a teaching tool to capture information about plants and their unique characteristics. The creations, over 800 of them, are made purely of glass, with only some using wire supports. The coloring and accuracy of these works of art will have you believing they are real, and their intricate detail will as­tound you.Particularly impressive is the collection of animal... (Woburn Daily Times)

Nov 2, 2017

Some Flowers Create Blue Halo to Attract Foraging Bees

But many tulip species, along with some kinds of daisy and peony, are among those that can do it, said Edwige Moyroud of Cambridge University in England. In a study published Wednesday by the journal Nature, Moyroud and others analyze the flower surfaces and used artificial flowers to show that bumblebees can see the halos.An accompanying commentary said the paper shows how flowers that aren’t blue can still use that color to attract bees. Further work should see whether the halo also attracts other insects, wrote Dimitri Deheyn of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California.

Oct 19, 2017

Some flowers create blue halo to say hello to foraging bees

But many tulip species, along with some kinds of daisy and peony, are among those that can do it, said Edwige Moyroud of Cambridge University in England.In a study published Wednesday by the journal Nature, Moyroud and others analyze the flower surfaces and used artificial flowers to show that bumblebees can see the halos.An accompanying commentary said the paper shows how flowers that aren’t blue can still use that color to attract bees. Further work should see whether the halo also attracts other insects, wrote Dimitri Deheyn of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in La Jolla, California. ...

Sep 22, 2017

In Perennial Bloom: A Century at Brattle Square Florist

Brattle Square Florist, clearly remembers his first Valentine’s Day in the shop. The store had more than 400 orders to be delivered to lovers across Cambridge, and no digital organizational system in place whatsoever. “Brattle Square Florist is run like it’s 1930,” Rickers says. Rickers is hardly exaggerating—he uses a computer for billing, but he and his staff write all other pertinent information on slips of paper that are tacked on a wall following some indistinguishable system of organization. The shop does have a “Rolodex,” as Rickers jokingly dubs a section of wall covered with business cards and phone numbers.Rickers was doubtful that the shop would be able to handle the Valentine’s Day rush, but the shop’s haphazard system was up to the task, as it has been since 1917. He soon let go of any reservations he had about the shop’s analog operations. “I would wager a large sum of money that we have fewer errors than most modernly run shops,” Rickers says.Brattle Square Florist shows few signs of changing with the times. It’s had 100 years to perfect its operations. The shop was originally run by three Greek brothers who cycled through a series of storefronts: produce, ice cream, and ultimately, the flower shop. For three generations, the business remained in the family, until it was so... (Harvard Crimson)

Sep 8, 2017

Princess Diana remembered: 'I left flowers in 1997'

Diana's favourite flowers: white roses, scented narcissi and a carpet of forget-me-nots.Her sons William and Harry, and the Duchess of Cambridge, have visited the White Garden, which has been transformed for the anniversary, in their own private tribute to the mother that so many strangers remain anxious to remember. (BBC News)

Sep 8, 2017

Flowers and a Card Got Her Attention

French Ministry of National Education, in Montbeliard, France.The couple met in 2013 when Ms. Ejebe, who was living in New York, traveled to Cambridge, Mass., to see a friend who was visiting from Nigeria and staying with Mr. Savoye, who was then working for Harvard’s Kennedy School.Mr. Savoye was instantly enamored of her.“I was intrigued by a number of things,” he said, listing her profession — they were both lawyers, but she was in corporate law — her worldliness, and the easy conversation the two shared. Also, he said, “I clearly just found her superattractive.”She also remembers an immediate interest. “I was drawn to him and wanted to look, maybe not so much talk, but just look at him,” she said.Their mutual friend told Mr. Savoye that Ms. Ejebe would be returning to Boston the following week on a work trip, and so Mr. Savoye called her and asked if they might get together.She turned him down, as her trip would be both brief and exhausting. He said he thought to himself, “Well, she’s not interested and I should just drop it.”But he didn’t. He made a plan to travel to New York a few weeks later, and admits now that he had made the plan for sooner than originally intended in the hope that he might meet with Ms. Ejebe, and so he gave asking her out one more shot.“I expected a no, to be honest, and she said yes,” he said.The two met on a Saturday at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and spent the date wandering through the galleries, exchanging observations about the works.“I really enjoyed his company, thought he was really sweet and very charming and very interesting,” Ms. Ejebe said.She suggested a second date — brunch the next morning, before his return to Cambridge — and Mr. Savoye took heart.On the Monday that followed, flowers were delivered to Ms. Ejebe’s office, and she knew immediately who had sent them. Pinned to the bouquet was a postcard from the Met, showing a Balthus painting the two had lingered over.“I really wanted to make a good impression on her,” he said.For Ms. Ejebe, who had been deliberating as to whether she was willing to consider a relationship with someone who lived so far away, the gesture was persuasive.“I was completely blown away by how considerate the note was, and just the effort!” she said. “It seemed worth it to try long-distance.”Two weeks later, Mr. Savoye returned to New York to take Ms. Ejebe to dinner, and the two shared their first kiss that evening.