Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Oregon, OR Florists

Find florist in Oregon state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a Oregon city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

Oregon Cities

Oregon State Featured Florists

Rose Of Sharon Occasion

280 Dogwood Ln
Cave Junction, OR 97523

Anderson Florist

202 Main Ave
Tillamook, OR 97112

Stems Floral

475 Country Club Ct
Lake Oswego, OR 97034

Alice's Flower Shop

1025 E Powell Blvd Ste 100
Gresham, OR 97030

The Natural Nook

738 Pacific Way
Gearhart, OR 97138

Oregon Flowers News

Jul 26, 2019

American-grown fashionable flowers on display: See Oregon's floral portrait - OregonLive

By Janet Eastman The Oregonian/OregonLive Posted June 30, 2019 at 08:49 AM Updated June 30, 2019 at 02:09 PM There’s so much we don’t know about florists. People who handle flowers for a living -- which also includes seed and bulb producers, growers, designers and sellers -- have a blooming sense of humor. How else to describe botanical bras and other fashion pieces woven with fronds, berries and buds grown in the U.S.? For the fifth year, the petal promoters who organize American Flowers Week in the days leading up t...

Jul 26, 2019

Beargrass and yucca: two signature Montana plants - Valleyjournal

Its growth is luxuriant and continues green all winter but the horses will not eat it.” During their long winter at Fort Clatsop in Oregon, Lewis noticed the Clatsop Indians making baskets. He recorded: “Their baskets are formed of cedar bark and beargrass so closely interwoven with the fingers that they are watertight without the aid of gum or rosin; some of these are highly ornamented with strans of bear grass, which they dye of several colors and interweave in a great variety of figures; this serves them the double purpose of holding their water or wearing on their heads.” It is for the construction of these baskets that the beargrass becomes an article of traffic among the natives. This grass grows only on their high mountains near the snowy region: “The young blades, which are white from not being exposed to the sun or air, are those most commonly employed, particularly in their neatest work.” Of the beargrass samples collected on the expedition, two still exist: one at the Lewis and Clark Herbarium and the other at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew near London. Also called “soapweed,” “Spanish bayonet” and, as we have just learned, “beargrass,” yucca blooms from a low cluster of long, pointed, spikey leaves. During the growing season, a tall stalk will emerge and produce large numbers (10 to 15) of substantial, 2.5-inch-long, greenish-white, bell-shaped flowers. Look for yucca in June or July, and while we associate them with dry prairie slopes or in badlands, these very hardy plants are known to thrive at elevations of 8,500 feet and survive winters of 40 and 50 degrees below zero. Hot sun and well-drained soil are this spikey plant’s friends, and only a very wet winter will damage it. Because cattle like the fleshy flowers and young seedpods, slightly greater amounts of yucca will be found where grazing pressure is light or moderate. And beware while hiking: the tips of the leaves are as miserable to bump into as a cactus. Native Americans of the plains used yucca roots for making soap and hair tonic. The central stalks, flowers and seedpods were eaten, and the spiny sharp pointed leaf tips, often with the tough fibers still attached, served as ready-made needles and threads. Y. glauca was first described for science in 1813 by the famous English botanist-naturalist Thomas Nuttall. Yucca is a native Haitian name, and glauca means “blue-green” in botanical Latin. Here in Montana, we have always considered beargrass to be the yucca of the mountains and yucca to be the beargrass of the plains. Luckily we are blessed with both. We thank Wayne Phillips, a recognized expert on Montana’s plants and flowers, for his insight on these plants in his great book “The Plants of the Lewis and Clark Expedition.” This work belongs in everyone’s library.

Jun 22, 2019

Floral and lush, this $12 South African white wine blend blossoms in your glass - The Washington Post

Beverage in Winchester, Vintage Wines in Harrisonburg, Rio Hill Wine & Beer in Charlottesville. GREAT VALUE Smith & Perry Pinot Noir 2015 Oregon, $15 Here’s an all-around tasty Oregon pinot noir, with Bing cherry and sarsaparilla flavors. It may be easy to finish this without realizing it, but you’ll want to savor this wine and save some for dinner. Distributed by Republic National: Available in the District at Ace Beverage, Circle Wine & Liquor, Rodman’s, Yes! Organic Market (various locations). Available in Maryland at Pine Orchard Liquors in Ellicott City, Wine Source in Baltimore. Availability information is based on distributor records. Wines might not be in stock at every listed store and might be sold at additional stores. Prices are approximate. Check Winesearcher.com to verify availability, or ask a favorite wine store to order through a distributor. More from Food: Wine ...

Jun 22, 2019

Homes and gardens events around Portland: Pollinator workshops, garden tours and more - OregonLive.com

Events are free unless noted. Please email calendar submissions at least two weeks in advance to eventsbestbets@oregonian.com.ONGOINGKids Cook -- Lents Farmers Market: 10-11 a.m. Sundays, July 7-Aug. 25. Kids ages 7-12 learn about the seasonality of food, meet local farmers and prepare ingredients purchased fresh at the market. Free but registration required at eventbrite.com; Southeast 92nd Avenue and Reedway Street; portlandfarmersmarket.org/programs-events Free Garden Tours at Pittock Mansion: 11 a.m.-2 p.m., second and fourth Saturdays of each month through Sept. 28. OSU Master Gardeners lead 30-minute informational tours, focusing on plants and garden areas while providing a glimpse into the Pittocks’ contributions to Portland’s gardens. pittockmansion.orgGuided Tours of Hoyt Arboretum: 11 a.m. and 1 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays through Oct. 27.

May 31, 2019

Slow Flowers Announces 2019 American Flowers Week - PerishableNews

FarmMISSOURI: Andrea K. Grist, Andrea K. Grist Floral Art (floral design), with flowers provided by Beth and Joel Fortin of Little Green Garden LLCOREGON: Beth Syphers, Crowley House Flower Farm (floral design), with flowers provided by Bethany and Charles Little, Charles Little & Co. SOUTH CAROLINA: Toni Reale, Roadside Blooms (floral design), with flowers provided by Laura Mewbourn, Feast & Flora Farm WASHINGTON: Tammy Myers, First & Bloom (floral design), with flowers supplied by Amy Brown, Laughing Goat Farm and Seattle Wholesale Growers Market Images for all of these looks and links to the creative teams are available at American Flowers Week Press Page (americanflowersweek.com) MORE ABOUT AMERICAN FLOWERS WEEKHeld in the heart of American Flowers Week, the third annual Slow Flowers Summit takes place on July 1 and 2, 2019, at the Paikka Event Space in St. Paul, Minnesota. Developed to stimulate new, sustainable practices in floral design and growing, the Summit and features flower farm tours, a farm-to-table dinner on a flower farm, presentations on floral design, best business practices, industry innovations and an interactive floral installation for all participants. Details are available at SlowFlowersSummit.com. American Flowers Week receives sponsorship from Syndicate Sales, Johnny’s Selected Seeds, Longfield Gardens, Mayesh Wholesale Florist, Seattle Wholesale Growers Market, the Association of Specialty Cut Flower Growers, and Florists’ Review magazine. American Flowers Week supporters can find more information and resources at americanflowersweek.com. Downloadable fact sheets, infographics and 2019 American Flowers Week logo and social media badges are available for growers and florists to use for marketing and promotion efforts. Participants are encouraged to use the social media tag #Americanflowersweek to help spread the word about this campaign across all platforms. ### About American Flowers Week: American Flowers Week is designed to engage the public, policymakers and the media in a conversation about the origins of their flowers. As an advocacy effort, the campaign coincides with America’s Independence Day on July 4th, providing florists, retailers, wholesalers and flower farmers a patriotic opportunity to promote American grown flowers.About Debra Prinzing: Debra Prinzing is a Seattle-based writer, speaker and leading advocate for American Grown Flowers. Through her many Slow Flowers-branded projects, she has convened a national conversation that stimulates consumers and professionals alike to make conscious choices about their floral purchases. Debra is the producer of SlowFlowers.com, the online directory to American grown farms, florists, shops and studios who supply domestic and local flowers. Each Wednesday, approximately 2,500 listeners tune into Debra’s “Slow Flowers Podcast,” available for free downloads at her web site, debraprinzing.com, or on iTunes and via other podcast services. She is the author of 10 books, including Slow Flowers and The 50 Mile Bouquet. ...