Birthday Flowers

A heart-warming Birthday surprise for someone you truly care about!

Funeral Service

Funeral Service Flowers for a well-lived life is the most cherished. Be that open heart for that special someone in grief.

Sympathy

Create that sense of peace and tranquility in their life with a gentle token of deepest affections in this time of need.

Flowers

Select from variety of flower arrangements with bright flowers and vibrant blossoms! Same Day Delivery Available!

Roses

Classically beautiful and elegant, assortment of roses is a timeless and thoughtful gift!

Plants

Blooming and Green Plants.

Ontario, ON Florists

Find florist in Ontario state that deliver flowers for any occasion including Birthdays, Anniversaries, Funerals as well as Valentines Day and Mother's Day. Select a Ontario city below to find local flower shops contact information, address and more.

Ontario Cities

Ontario State Featured Florists

Sobeys

1500 Upper Middle Rd W
Oakville, ON L6M3G3

Paris Florist

1500 Islington Avenue
Etobicoke, ON M9A3L7

Margaret's Fernlea Flowers & Gifts

7 Talbot Street East
Aylmer, ON N5H1H3

Zehrs

821 Niagara St N
Welland, ON L3C1M4

Signature Flowers, Ltd.

75 Daniel St. N
Arnprior, ON K7S2K7

Ontario Flowers News

Jul 26, 2018

Grieving families protest 'duplicitous' website that reposts death notices to sell flower deliveries

Its CEO is Paco Leclerc of Montreal, according to his LinkedIn page. Earlier this year, the parents of an Ontario child who died of cancer said they were "absolutely gutted" to see their son's obituary used in this way. Similar complaints in Newfoundland led to suggestions from a lawyer that the practice of copying text from published obituaries violates intellectual property law, just as much as if Everhere had cut and pasted a literary short story. The site offers the chance to post free messages of condolence, and it advertises flower deliveries through Bloomstoday, a florist based in Virginia that coordinates with local flower delivery services. In the new Alberta case, Rick Laursen, who works in health and safety in the oil industry, moved into his parents' house in Calgary recently to help when his father Erik, 83, was diagnosed with cancer. Erik's wife and Rick's mother Margaret, 92, has vascular related dementia, and would often ask about her husband. Rick would explain that he was very sick, but then she would forget and ask again. He found he was causing her fresh grief over and over again, multiple times a day. After consulting with her physician and an expert with the Alberta health system, he settled on a plan of telling her that Erik was tired and needed to rest. Rick recalled the doctor saying the "best you can do is tell her he's not here right now and eventually she will stop asking … You are causing her more harm than good by making her live (with) something she cannot process." She still does not know he died last week, and she did not attend the funeral on the weekend. She has never used a computer, so the online aspect did not bother Rick. He gave details to a local funeral home, but then a modified version appeared on Everhere.com: "Sadly, on July 4th, 2018, Erik Laursen of Calgary, Alberta left us for a better place. Family and friends can send flowers and condolences in memory of the loved one …" Much of the text had been copied word for word. Rick said they "completely stole from the real obituary." But that opening quotation was not only newly written, it also managed to misinform mourne...

Jun 14, 2018

In The Garden | Certain flower colors are better to attract hummingbirds

He is a member of the Mansfield Men's Garden Club and was editor of the club newsletter (The Greenhorn) for 21 years. He resides in Ontario with his wife, Barbara. Reach him at 419-529-2966.

Apr 20, 2018

Banned pesticides found in flowers sold in Ottawa

Ottawa were tested and found to contain traces of banned pesticides. (Friends of the Earth Canada)An environmental group has complained to the Ontario government that it has found banned pesticides on flowers sold to gardeners in Ottawa. The pesticides include residues of neonicotinoids which are harmful to bees and human health.The non-profit group, Friends of the Earth is calling on the provincial government to investigate and a spokesman says the environment department will consider the request.Canadians buy flowers at this time of year to plant in their gardens and may unwittingly be using plants containing harmful pesticides. (Friends of the Earth Canada)Laws must be enforced, says environmentalist“Gardeners buying plants at major retailers…are unknowingly getting plants containing harmful, banned cosmetic pesticides. The retailers are breaking the law,” said Beatrice Olivastri, Chief Executive Officer, Friends of the Earth Canada in a news release.“Gardeners need to be vigilant and demand their garden centre sell only plants that are safe for bees, families and their pets. Friends of the Earth’s testing results show some garden centres are not trustworthy.”Olivast... (Radio Canada International)

Mar 8, 2018

Aquatic blooms of the lotus flower flourish on Canadian stamps March 1

Its habitat in Canada is the “northern limit along the shores of lakes Erie and St. Clair in southern Ontario.”This flower also occurs throughout most of the eastern half of the United States, as well as California, and as far south as Honduras.Both the sacred and the American lotus are edible and also have been used for medicinal purposes.Each set in Canada Post’s Spring Flowers series has been issued both in a self-adhesive booklet and in a perforated souvenir sheet.The first set from 2002 consists of 48¢ Tulips stamps in four designs (Scott 1946-1947). These were followed by the 2005 50¢ Daffodils (Scott 2091-2093), the 2007 52¢ Lilacs (2206-2208), the 2008 52¢ Peonies (2260-2262), and the 2009 54¢ Rhododendrons (2318-2320).Since 2010, the Spring Flowers issues have been created as nondenominated permanent stamps: the 2010 (57¢) African Violets (Scott 2376-2378), the 2011 (59¢) Sunflowers (2440-2444), the 2012 (61¢) Daylilies (2526-2530), the 2013 (63¢) Magnolias (2621-2625), 2014 (85¢) Hybrid Tea Roses (2727-2731), 2015 (85¢) Pansies (2810-2813), 2016 (85¢) Hydrangeas (2896-2900), and 2017 (85¢) Daisies (2976-80).The new Lotus stamps were printed by Lowe-Martin. Additional information on the print quantities or specific order numbers was unavailable at press time, but will be included in a future issue of Linn’s.Canada Post will service official first-day covers franked with both of the booklet stamps. The FDC will bear a postmark from Waterdown, Ontario.These stamps and related items are available here. Stamps and FDCs are available by mail order from Canada Post Customer Service, Box 90022, 2701 Riverside Drive, Ottawa, ON K1V 1J8 Canada; or by telephone from the United States or Canada at 800-565-4362, and from other countries at 902-863-6550.Connect with Linn’s Stamp News: Sign up for our newsletter Like us on Facebook Follow us on TwitterCanada’s stamps and stamp products also are available from many new-issue stamp dealers, and from Canada Post’s agent in the United States: Interpost, Box 420, Hewlett, NY 11557.

Dec 29, 2017

Alamosa Flowers: Berries for wildlife

I think it would be hard for weeds to compete. Coralberry is native to the eastern and central US as well as Ontario, Canada and Northeastern Mexico.Unfortunately, most berries prefer moist, acidic soil while SLV soil tends to be dry and alkaline. One of my favorite shrubs that loves moisture is Saskatoon serviceberry (Amelanchier alnifolia). I first saw them in Canada -- great huge hedges of them. Sadly, mine finally died. I enjoyed the flowers and the berries. The birds loved the berries, too! My best guess as to its demise is that it was in an arid area of the garden. If I try again, I’ll make sure to plant it in a moister bed.Another shrub that didn’t do well after a few years in my garden was the nannyberry (Viburnum lentago). Again, I think my two specimens needed more water. They tolerated our cold winters, but seemed to need more moisture in the growing season. I loved the large white blooms and the birds loved the berries. Fruits are edible and often used to make jams and jellies – mine were rather bitter. According to the Missouri Botanical Garden (MBG) website, nanny goats apparently feed on the ripe berries – more so than billy goats – hence the common name.By the way, any of the plants I mentioned that I’ve grown are shown on the AlamosaFlowers.net website.Holly (Ilex spp.) is probably the most celebrated of the winter berries – the vast majority have red berries. I would love to have some in my garden. Has anyone had luck growing any in the SLV? If so, please email me: [email protected]!Winterberry (Ilex verticillata) is rated down to zone 3 and is native to Eastern North America. I don’t know if would do well at our elevation, however. The MSB garden website says, “the species is infrequently sold in commerce because of the many excellent cultivars which generally produce showier flowers and larger, more abundant fruit.” It does have female and male plants.LifeScapeColorado.com reports that the Berry Magic Holly variety from Monrovia is self-pollinating. It is listed as zone 5, not hardy enough for the SLV. Another Monrovia variety is Winter Red rated down to zone 2. However, it needs male and female plants and consistently moist soil.Cotoneasters are often cited as berry-producing plants that attract birds. However, my Peking contoneaster (Cotoneaster acutifolia) is not attractive to any animals! It retains its berries year after year. I enjoy looking at them!“Did you know Santa is three times a gardener? He hoes, hoes, hoes.” My take on various Santa jokes.